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digitalmars.D.learn - In-source way to call any C Library

reply Adrian Iliescu <nona liame.moc> writes:
Is there a way to call a C function without having to screw around with the
linker on the command line?  In C#, for example, this is all you have to do:

        [DllImport(  "..\Debug\CLibTest.dll" )]    //location
        internal static extern int MyTestResult(); //name of function

        void CSUsingCLib()
        {
            int result = MyTestResult(); //use it
        }
Mar 18 2011
next sibling parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2011-03-18 19:54, Adrian Iliescu wrote:
 Is there a way to call a C function without having to screw around with the
 linker on the command line?  In C#, for example, this is all you have to do:

          [DllImport(  "..\Debug\CLibTest.dll" )]    //location
          internal static extern int MyTestResult(); //name of function

          void CSUsingCLib()
          {
              int result = MyTestResult(); //use it
          }

With pragma(lib, "lib"); you can link to a library: http://www.digitalmars.com/d/2.0/pragma.html And then using extern(C) as usual to declare the function. You can also use "dlopen" and friends on Posix and whatever the equivalent is for Windows. -- /Jacob Carlborg
Mar 18 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
For runtime linking with DLLs, you're looking for LoadLibrary,
GetProcAddress and friends. They're in core.sys.windows.windows.

The static constructor is useful if you want to have C functions in
module scope. Personally, I wrap C libraries in classes and hide all
the loading details there.

However the following is what I think you're after:
module testDllLoad;

import std.stdio;
import std.string;
import std.path : join, curdir;
import core.sys.windows.windows;
import std.exception;

extern(C) int function() MyTestResult;

static this()
{
    string dllFileName = join(r"..\Debug\", "CLibTest.dll");
    HMODULE dllModule;
    enforce(dllModule = LoadLibraryA(toStringz(dllFileName)));
    enforce(MyTestResult = GetProcAddress(dllModule, "_MyTestResult"));
}

void CSUsingCLib()
{
    int result = MyTestResult();  // use it
    writeln(result);
}

void main()
{
    CSUsingCLib();
}

I've tested this with a C DLL which exports the function
_MyTestResult. The DLL was located in the previous directory, under
Debug, just like your example. It worked fine.

Btw, in case you don't know, its very important to specify the calling
convention and the /correct/ calling convention for a function. For a
C DLL this is always extern(C).
Mar 18 2011
prev sibling parent Jesse Phillips <jessekphillips+D gmail.com> writes:
Adrian Iliescu Wrote:

 Is there a way to call a C function without having to screw around with the
 linker on the command line?  In C#, for example, this is all you have to do:
 
         [DllImport(  "..\Debug\CLibTest.dll" )]    //location
         internal static extern int MyTestResult(); //name of function
 
         void CSUsingCLib()
         {
             int result = MyTestResult(); //use it
         }

You may find the Library referenced here useful: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3818229/loading-plugins-dlls-on-the-fly
Mar 18 2011