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digitalmars.D - Slides about Nemerle

reply bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Simple slides about Nemerle language, derived from C#, so far I have never used
Nemerle:
http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/gnaop/nemerle_vs_c/

The things I like more are yield (page 20 and 44 of the PDF), some tuple syntax
(page 51), pattern matching and algebraic types (especially page 64 and 65).
(Macros too may be cool, but they are another level of complexity). It seems it
uses a simple syntax for tuples, and the pattern matching syntax too looks
simple.

Bye,
bearophile
Apr 11 2011
next sibling parent reply Piotr Szturmaj <bncrbme jadamspam.pl> writes:
bearophile wrote:
 Simple slides about Nemerle language, derived from C#, so far I have never
used Nemerle:
 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/gnaop/nemerle_vs_c/

 The things I like more are yield (page 20 and 44 of the PDF), some tuple
syntax (page 51), pattern matching and algebraic types (especially page 64 and
65). (Macros too may be cool, but they are another level of complexity). It
seems it uses a simple syntax for tuples, and the pattern matching syntax too
looks simple.

 Bye,
 bearophile

C# has yield since version 2.0: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/rmcochran/yieldreturn04022006113850AM/yieldreturn.aspx
Apr 11 2011
parent VladD2 <vc rsdn.ru> writes:
This is a yield in method. Nemerle support it too. But Nemerle support
yield inside separate expression.
Apr 12 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent spir <denis.spir gmail.com> writes:
On 04/11/2011 02:05 PM, bearophile wrote:
 Simple slides about Nemerle language, derived from C#, so far I have never
used Nemerle:
 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/gnaop/nemerle_vs_c/

 The things I like more are yield (page 20 and 44 of the PDF), some tuple
syntax (page 51), pattern matching and algebraic types (especially page 64 and
65). (Macros too may be cool, but they are another level of complexity). It
seems it uses a simple syntax for tuples, and the pattern matching syntax too
looks simple.

Looks like a nice language, indeed... and strangely similar to Ocaml (born 1996 IIRC) ;-) Denis -- _________________ vita es estrany spir.wikidot.com
Apr 11 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent "Nick Sabalausky" <a a.a> writes:
"bearophile" <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> wrote in message 
news:inuqqs$niq$1 digitalmars.com...
 Simple slides about Nemerle language, derived from C#, so far I have never 
 used Nemerle:
 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/gnaop/nemerle_vs_c/

 The things I like more are yield (page 20 and 44 of the PDF), some tuple 
 syntax (page 51), pattern matching and algebraic types (especially page 64 
 and 65). (Macros too may be cool, but they are another level of 
 complexity). It seems it uses a simple syntax for tuples, and the pattern 
 matching syntax too looks simple.

Yea. I've still never used Nemerle (never liked the idea of being constrained to a VM), but ever since I came across it I've been a huge fan of it's patten matching and, to a slightly lesser extent, it's macros too. So much so, in fact, that it's been really tempting to try using it for a few things instead of D despite the VM ball-and-chain. Seeing Nemerle's pattern matching added to D would make me an incredibly happy D user.
Apr 11 2011
prev sibling parent VladD2 <vc rsdn.ru> writes:
bearophile Wrote:

 Simple slides about Nemerle language, derived from C#, so far I have never
used Nemerle:
 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/gnaop/nemerle_vs_c/

It is better to learn a language by reading articles about it, but not looking to slides. Here is a simple introduction to the language: https://docs.google.com/document/d/140tNKZrj8vgp7uGgK1tb7sVM_G45ZHTBf8McOLppy-k/edit?hl=en&authkey=CIiBucIC#
Apr 14 2011