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digitalmars.D - what do the boost.org guys think of D

reply dennis luehring <dennis_member pathlink.com> writes:
any comments from them?
Jan 27 2006
next sibling parent "Craig Black" <cblack ara.com> writes:
Not that I know of.  But I get the impression that, for the most part, they 
do not have a high opinion of D.

-Craig 
Jan 27 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
dennis luehring wrote:
 any comments from them?

Google old threads in comp.lang.c++.moderated and see if David Abrahams is in any dialogues with Walter--I think there have been a few in the past. But the c.l.c++.m crowd are a hard group to please--D hasn't received a tremendous amount of support there in the past. That said, a few notable folks in the C++ community have voiced support for D or at least for some of the features of D. It's also worth pointing out that some of these features (GC and contracts, for example) are being proposed for inclusion in the next C++ standard :-) Sean
Jan 27 2006
prev sibling parent reply "Tony" <ignorethis nowhere.com> writes:
"dennis luehring" <dennis_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:drdfik$1eer$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 any comments from them?

Anyone who is involved with boost probably has a high opinion of C++, and is therefore likely to find fault with any language that isn't C++. At best, I suspect they would take a superficial look at D and take note of those facilities that are in C++ but missing from D (eg multiple inheritance, const). This leads to a negative first impression that deters them from spending the additional time required to understand the strengths of D. Another issue is that C++ and D share the same ecological niche. I suspect that proponents of more dissimilar languages might provide fairer criticisms. Tony Melbourne, Australia
Jan 27 2006
next sibling parent S. Chancellor <dnewsgr mephit.kicks-ass.org> writes:
On 2006-01-27 15:46:40 -0800, "Tony" <ignorethis nowhere.com> said:

 "dennis luehring" <dennis_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:drdfik$1eer$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 any comments from them?
 
 

Anyone who is involved with boost probably has a high opinion of C++, and is therefore likely to find fault with any language that isn't C++. At best, I suspect they would take a superficial look at D and take note of those facilities that are in C++ but missing from D (eg multiple inheritance, const). This leads to a negative first impression that deters them from spending the additional time required to understand the strengths of D. Another issue is that C++ and D share the same ecological niche. I suspect that proponents of more dissimilar languages might provide fairer criticisms. Tony Melbourne, Australia

I think you're failing to notice that a major portion of C++ users disdain the language, but did prefer it better than anything else. For example, me! As soon as I found D, i rejoiced. Unfortunately, D hasn't yet culminated to the point where I can use it for everything I want to. -S.
Jan 27 2006
prev sibling parent reply "Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"Tony" <ignorethis nowhere.com> wrote in message 
news:drebd5$2vf0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 "dennis luehring" <dennis_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:drdfik$1eer$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 any comments from them?

is therefore likely to find fault with any language that isn't C++.

I often (unsurprisingly) find that people who have invested a great deal of effort into mastering one particular language are very reluctant to find much good in other languages. That also explains why the D programming community is a relatively young crowd.
Jan 27 2006
parent reply nick <nick.atamas gmail.com> writes:
On 2006-01-27 19:15:15 -0800, "Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> said:

 
 "Tony" <ignorethis nowhere.com> wrote in message 
 news:drebd5$2vf0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 "dennis luehring" <dennis_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:drdfik$1eer$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 any comments from them?

and is therefore likely to find fault with any language that isn't C++.

I often (unsurprisingly) find that people who have invested a great deal of effort into mastering one particular language are very reluctant to find much good in other languages. That also explains why the D programming community is a relatively young crowd.

I am not sure about that. D is C/C++/Java like. I have introduced many people to the D language/website and everyone had generally the same reaction: "Wow this looks like a fantastic language, but will it take off?" I share that concern, as D lacks a major corporate sponsor or a major following. However, I am hopeful, and I look forward to contributing to the D community.
Jan 28 2006
parent reply Mark T <Mark_member pathlink.com> writes:
I am not sure about that. D is C/C++/Java like. I have introduced many 
people to the D language/website and everyone had generally the same 
reaction: "Wow this looks like a fantastic language, but will it take 
off?"

I share that concern, as D lacks a major corporate sponsor or a major 
following.

Just because Java and C# needed corporate backing doesn't mean that there aren't other ways for a language to succeed. D needs to be successful enough to have an O'Reilly book published.
Jan 28 2006
next sibling parent =?iso-8859-1?q?Knud_S=F8rensen?= <12tkvvb02 sneakemail.com> writes:
On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 13:41:34 +0000, Mark T wrote:

 
I am not sure about that. D is C/C++/Java like. I have introduced many 
people to the D language/website and everyone had generally the same 
reaction: "Wow this looks like a fantastic language, but will it take 
off?"

I share that concern, as D lacks a major corporate sponsor or a major 
following.

Just because Java and C# needed corporate backing doesn't mean that there aren't other ways for a language to succeed. D needs to be successful enough to have an O'Reilly book published.

Or maybe start publishing new versions on http://freshmeat.net
Jan 28 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Rod Haper <rhaper houston.rr.com> writes:
Mark T wrote:
 Nick wrote:
 I share that concern, as D lacks a major corporate sponsor or a major 
 following.

Who was the "major corporate sponsor" for Perl, Python and Ruby?

I don't know about Perl or Ruby but Python had the early backing and support of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI) which served in a mid-wife role as Python transitioned from an academic to commercial/personal use status. -- Rod
Jan 28 2006
prev sibling parent reply vania vaniacilli.com writes:
In article <drfsae$1941$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Mark T says...
I am not sure about that. D is C/C++/Java like. I have introduced many 
people to the D language/website and everyone had generally the same 
reaction: "Wow this looks like a fantastic language, but will it take 
off?"

I share that concern, as D lacks a major corporate sponsor or a major 
following.

Just because Java and C# needed corporate backing doesn't mean that there aren't other ways for a language to succeed.

Without a major sponsor D is not going anywhere. D doesn't sports features that are peculiar enough to lure people away from industry standards (JAVA/.NET/C++)
Jan 30 2006
parent John Reimer <terminal.node gmail.com> writes:
vania vaniacilli.com wrote:
 In article <drfsae$1941$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Mark T says...
 I am not sure about that. D is C/C++/Java like. I have introduced many 
 people to the D language/website and everyone had generally the same 
 reaction: "Wow this looks like a fantastic language, but will it take 
 off?"

 I share that concern, as D lacks a major corporate sponsor or a major 
 following.

Just because Java and C# needed corporate backing doesn't mean that there aren't other ways for a language to succeed.

Without a major sponsor D is not going anywhere. D doesn't sports features that are peculiar enough to lure people away from industry standards (JAVA/.NET/C++)

Regarding sponsorship, this may be true; but have you actually programmed a project in D? I believe you are incorrect regarding sported features. The sported "features" in D that make it better than those languages is the manifold simplicity of implementing equivalent code. D's weaknesses however lie elsewhere: lack of libraries, support tools, documentation, and... major sponsorship... these are hindering D's adoption. -JJR
Jan 30 2006