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digitalmars.D.learn - Windows Console and writing Unicode characters

reply Brad <bjazmoore outlook.com> writes:
I am new here so I will post this in Learn.

I have been doing a bit of reading on printing unicode characters 
in the Windows Console.  Specifically W10 command prompt.  I ran 
across a post by Adam Ruppe in a thread created a couple years 
ago which links a short bit of code and a quick discussion that 
Adam presents on his blog.  Here is a link to the specific reply 
I refer to: 
https://forum.dlang.org/post/sjsqqhwvlonohvwyqihr forum.dlang.org

Which points to his Blog post here: 
http://dpldocs.info/this-week-in-d/Blog.Posted_2019_11_25.html#unicode

The code snippet works great and does exactly what I want it to 
do.  I am just curious - since it works by basically providing a 
custom implementation for writeln rather than use the one in 
stdout module (package?) that would mean any other functions from 
that package I would want to leverage I would need to include by 
name.

Would it be acceptable then to maybe rename the custom writeln 
functions in my own code to something like uniwriteln and then 
include the standard library for other functions I might want to 
use?  I am guessing this is not a problem, although I found the 
code a little intimidating and was not sure I wanted to play fast 
and lose with it...

Thanks
Mar 28
next sibling parent reply Adam D. Ruppe <destructionator gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 29 March 2021 at 02:12:57 UTC, Brad wrote:
 a custom implementation for writeln rather than use the one in 
 stdout module (package?) that would mean any other functions 
 from that package I would want to leverage I would need to 
 include by name.
You can still import std.stdio and use other functions with just the one overridden. D handles name lookups by just ... well, looking up lol. It starts in the current scope, then checks the next one up until the module, then starts looking at imported modules for the name. If there's two with the same name, it prefers the most local one, but you can override that by using the full name: import std.stdio; void writeln() {} writeln(); // since you have a local name, it uses that first getc(); // no local name, so it checks the imported modules std.stdio.writeln(); // specifically uses the one from the module
Mar 29
parent Brad <bjazmoore outlook.com> writes:
On Monday, 29 March 2021 at 11:53:32 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe wrote:
 On Monday, 29 March 2021 at 02:12:57 UTC, Brad wrote:
 [...]
You can still import std.stdio and use other functions with just the one overridden. D handles name lookups by just ... well, looking up lol. It starts in the current scope, then checks the next one up until the module, then starts looking at imported modules for the name. If there's two with the same name, it prefers the most local one, but you can override that by using the full name: import std.stdio; void writeln() {} writeln(); // since you have a local name, it uses that first getc(); // no local name, so it checks the imported modules std.stdio.writeln(); // specifically uses the one from the module
Perfect. Thank you Adam.
Mar 29
prev sibling parent reply Luhrel <lucien.perregaux gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 29 March 2021 at 02:12:57 UTC, Brad wrote:
 I am new here so I will post this in Learn.

 I have been doing a bit of reading on printing unicode 
 characters in the Windows Console.  Specifically W10 command 
 prompt.  I ran across a post by Adam Ruppe in a thread created 
 a couple years ago which links a short bit of code and a quick 
 discussion that Adam presents on his blog.  Here is a link to 
 the specific reply I refer to: 
 https://forum.dlang.org/post/sjsqqhwvlonohvwyqihr forum.dlang.org

 [...]
I have been used this trick in C++, so it might also work in D: ``` import core.stdc.stdlib; import std.stdio; void main() { version(Windows) system("chcp 65001 > NUL".ptr); writeln("çéäö"); } ```
Mar 30
next sibling parent Vinod K Chandran <kcvinu82 gmail.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 08:31:02 UTC, Luhrel wrote:

 I have been used this trick in C++, so it might also work in D:
 ```
 import core.stdc.stdlib;
 import std.stdio;

 void main()
 {
     version(Windows)
         system("chcp 65001 > NUL".ptr);
     writeln("çéäö");
 }
 ```
Works like a charm in Cmder. But it displayed some squares in CMD.
Mar 30
prev sibling parent reply Adam D. Ruppe <destructionator gmail.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 08:31:02 UTC, Luhrel wrote:
 I have been used this trick in C++, so it might also work in D:
If you follow through the link that's what I mention as being a bad idea and provide the code given as a more correct alternative. It changes a global (well to the console) setting that persists after your program terminates, which can break other programs later, it can trigger font changes, and it doesn't actually always work anyway. You're much better off calling the correct functions.
Mar 30
parent Luhrel <lucien.perregaux gmail.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 13:19:02 UTC, Adam D. Ruppe wrote:
 On Tuesday, 30 March 2021 at 08:31:02 UTC, Luhrel wrote:
 I have been used this trick in C++, so it might also work in D:
If you follow through the link that's what I mention as being a bad idea and provide the code given as a more correct alternative. It changes a global (well to the console) setting that persists after your program terminates, which can break other programs later, it can trigger font changes, and it doesn't actually always work anyway. You're much better off calling the correct functions.
Oh okay, I never had those issues, strangely enough. It's a good website BTW.
Mar 30