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digitalmars.D.learn - Shift operator, unexpected result

reply JG <JG somewhere.com> writes:
I found the following behaviour, as part of a more complicated 
algorithm, unexpected. The program:

     import std;
     void main()
     {
         int n = 64;
         writeln(123uL>>n);
     }

produces:

123

I would expect 0.

What is the rationale for this behaviour or is it a bug?
Jun 09
next sibling parent kinke <noone nowhere.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 June 2021 at 19:13:10 UTC, JG wrote:
 I found the following behaviour, as part of a more complicated 
 algorithm, unexpected. The program:

     import std;
     void main()
     {
         int n = 64;
         writeln(123uL>>n);
     }

 produces:

 123

 I would expect 0.

 What is the rationale for this behaviour or is it a bug?
This is undefined behavior as in other languages, see §3 in https://dlang.org/spec/expression.html#shift_expressions.
Jun 09
prev sibling next sibling parent tsbockman <thomas.bockman gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 June 2021 at 19:13:10 UTC, JG wrote:
 I found the following behaviour, as part of a more complicated 
 algorithm, unexpected. The program:

     import std;
     void main()
     {
         int n = 64;
         writeln(123uL>>n);
     }

 produces:

 123

 I would expect 0.

 What is the rationale for this behaviour or is it a bug?
Because it is a high-performance systems programming language, the designers of D decided to make the arithmetic operations of basic types map directly to the arithmetic operations built in to the CPU; most operations are a single instruction. The benefit of this is higher performance and smaller binaries. The disadvantage is that the behaviour of the built in CPU operations sometimes differs from ordinary arithmetic in surprising and frustrating ways. If you want to trade a some speed for correctness/predictability, try my `checkedint` Dub package. Either way, take a glance at the [introduction to the documentation](https://checkedint.dpldocs.info/checkedint.html), where I list some of the quirks of CPU integer behaviour. For bit shifts, specifically, many CPUs ignore all but the bottom `log2(T.sizeof * 8)` bits of the right-hand operand. (`core.bitop.bsr` can be used to do very fast integer `log2` operations, and works in CTFE.) Thus, `a >> b` behaves like `a >> (b & c)`, where `c` is `(T.sizeof * 8) - 1`. For unsigned types, the behaviour that you very reasonably expect requires two additional instruction on x86, which looks like this: `(b <= c)? (a >> b) : 0`. (This should be branchless thanks to the `cmov` instruction.) For signed types, some additional work is required to handle negative shifts; see my `checkedint` package.
Jun 09
prev sibling parent Kagamin <spam here.lot> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 June 2021 at 19:13:10 UTC, JG wrote:
 produces:

 123

 I would expect 0.

 What is the rationale for this behaviour or is it a bug?
Processor just takes lower 6 bits for the shift amount and those hold zero in your case, shifting by 65 will shift by 1.
Jun 10