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digitalmars.D.announce - Symantec has been sold to Broadcom

reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/broadcom-buy-symantec-enterprise-division-201706500.html

It's the end of an era. Symantec bought my company, Zortech, and now is bought 
in return. The D community, and myself personally, owe a debt of gratitude to 
Symantec.

Thank you, Symantec!
Aug 08
next sibling parent reply 12345swordy <alexanderheistermann gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 8 August 2019 at 23:46:38 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:
 https://finance.yahoo.com/news/broadcom-buy-symantec-enterprise-division-201706500.html

 It's the end of an era. Symantec bought my company, Zortech, 
 and now is bought in return. The D community, and myself 
 personally, owe a debt of gratitude to Symantec.

 Thank you, Symantec!
What does this mean for the future of the D language?
Aug 08
parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 8/8/2019 5:33 PM, 12345swordy wrote:
 What does this mean for the future of the D language?
Nothing, since D is now fully Boost Licensed. But it's important for those interested in how D came about.
Aug 08
parent reply DanielG <simpletangent gmail.com> writes:
Software is a funny thing. I'm old enough to remember when 
everything was locked down and proprietary, of economic 
necessity. Nowadays it's almost entirely the opposite, for the 
same reason.

We're definitely well into the Singularity, but because our time 
perception is keeping up with it, it doesn't *seem* like things 
are moving as fast as they really are. But whenever I stop to 
really appreciate what's possible with software now, most of it 
was nearly or totally inconceivable back in the 90s.

Fully expecting to be gunned down by a Boston Dynamics T-800 any 
day now.
Aug 08
parent reply solidstate1991 <laszloszeremi outlook.com> writes:
On Friday, 9 August 2019 at 02:22:11 UTC, DanielG wrote:
 Software is a funny thing. I'm old enough to remember when 
 everything was locked down and proprietary, of economic 
 necessity. Nowadays it's almost entirely the opposite, for the 
 same reason.

 We're definitely well into the Singularity, but because our 
 time perception is keeping up with it, it doesn't *seem* like 
 things are moving as fast as they really are. But whenever I 
 stop to really appreciate what's possible with software now, 
 most of it was nearly or totally inconceivable back in the 90s.

 Fully expecting to be gunned down by a Boston Dynamics T-800 
 any day now.
Sometimes even middleware was so proprietary that it took the community to reverse engineer how to interface with various hardware, some pieces of hardware were partly a failure thanks to that. An example is Creative's ASP chip for the SB16 and 32, and they learned so well from the events that they bought up OpenAL to make it proprietary. Nowadays I'm thinking on what kind of license should I use on my "open source media franchise" (or whatever I should call it), since I don't want to keep it all for myself, and I would like to encourage other authors to not only write what is essentially glorified fanfiction, but to contribute back so other creators and even I can build upon that. My current candidate is LGPL on the lore, character design, etc, while end products using them can be proprietary.
Aug 09
parent "H. S. Teoh" <hsteoh quickfur.ath.cx> writes:
On Fri, Aug 09, 2019 at 09:36:53PM +0000, solidstate1991 via
Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
[...]
 Nowadays I'm thinking on what kind of license should I use on my "open
 source media franchise" (or whatever I should call it), since I don't
 want to keep it all for myself, and I would like to encourage other
 authors to not only write what is essentially glorified fanfiction,
 but to contribute back so other creators and even I can build upon
 that. My current candidate is LGPL on the lore, character design, etc,
 while end products using them can be proprietary.
Have you ever looked at the Creative Commons licenses? Some of them are geared for just this purpose, to make art/media/etc. shareable in the way you describe. T -- The peace of mind---from knowing that viruses which exploit Microsoft system vulnerabilities cannot touch Linux---is priceless. -- Frustrated system administrator.
Aug 09
prev sibling next sibling parent John Carter <john.carter taitradio.com> writes:
On Thursday, 8 August 2019 at 23:46:38 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:

 It's the end of an era. Symantec bought my company, Zortech, 
 and now is bought in return. The D community, and myself 
 personally, owe a debt of gratitude to Symantec.
You were lucky... ...in another age of the world they bought the Whitewater Group and with it the Actor language and.... ...strangled it. (Actor was a lovely SmallTalk alike OOP language) https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=LjwEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PT86&pg=PT86#v=onepage&q&f=false
Aug 08
prev sibling next sibling parent =?UTF-8?Q?Ali_=c3=87ehreli?= <acehreli yahoo.com> writes:
On 08/08/2019 04:46 PM, Walter Bright wrote:
 https://finance.yahoo.com/news/broadcom-buy-symantec-enterprise-div
sion-201706500.html 
 
 
 It's the end of an era. Symantec bought my company, Zortech, and now is 
 bought in return. The D community, and myself personally, owe a debt of 
 gratitude to Symantec.
 
 Thank you, Symantec!
We thanked Symantec dozens of times for years as our venue provider during many Silicon Valley ACCU meetings ("meetup" in current language). They let us, total strangers to them, hold meetings every month until current organizers of the meetups spread it out to multiple other venues. Ali
Aug 09
prev sibling next sibling parent Martino <maser.one11 gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 8 August 2019 at 23:46:38 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:
 https://finance.yahoo.com/news/broadcom-buy-symantec-enterprise-division-201706500.html

 It's the end of an era. Symantec bought my company, Zortech, 
 and now is bought in return. The D community, and myself 
 personally, owe a debt of gratitude to Symantec.

 Thank you, Symantec!
I remember my first real work experience. We used Borland C++ and some time later we bought Symantec C++. The fastest C++ compiler at the time. A thunderbolt. Many memories... Martino.
Aug 09
prev sibling parent reply =?iso-8859-1?Q?Robert_M._M=FCnch?= <robert.muench saphirion.com> writes:
On 2019-08-08 23:46:38 +0000, Walter Bright said:

 https://finance.yahoo.com/news/broadcom-buy-symantec-enterprise-div
sion-201706500.html 
 
 
 It's the end of an era. Symantec bought my company, Zortech, and now is 
 bought in return. The D community, and myself personally, owe a debt of 
 gratitude to Symantec.
 
 Thank you, Symantec!
Walter, you might not remember, but we once met at an exhibiton in Wiesbaden (I think), Germany, where you were with Symantec for the C++ compiler and we had a short chat. And I once tested a bunch of C++ compilers for a German computer magazine... this all must be around 25 years ago. -- Robert M. Münch http://www.saphirion.com smarter | better | faster
Aug 18
parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 8/18/2019 1:40 PM, Robert M. Münch wrote:
 Walter, you might not remember, but we once met at an exhibiton in Wiesbaden
(I 
 think), Germany, where you were with Symantec for the C++ compiler and we had
a 
 short chat. And I once tested a bunch of C++ compilers for a German computer 
 magazine... this all must be around 25 years ago.
I do remember meeting some journalists there - but I think it was Hamburg! Nice to hear from you!
Aug 18