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digitalmars.D.announce - Let's celebrate Dlang on D day

reply Murilo <murilomiranda92 hotmail.com> writes:
On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, but I 
have decided to turn it into our own holiday to celebrate the D 
language. So on this day please take the time to tell the world 
about this language and to invite more people into our community. 
I will try to give some talks at universities in order to get the 
attention of the people. I suggest you all do similar stuff. In 
the Dlang facebook group 
https://www.facebook.com/groups/662119670846705/ which has 
already reached 135 members, we will be doing lots of fun stuff. 
Please show up and join the group to participate. I will try to 
turn this into an actual holiday. I hope you can all help me out.
May 24
next sibling parent reply Mike Franklin <slavo5150 yahoo.com> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 03:22:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:
 On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, but 
 I have decided to turn it into our own holiday to celebrate the 
 D language.
I'm sure you mean well, but I will be spending D-Day remembering the sacrifice of these men: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings#/media/File:Normandy_American_Cemetery_and_Memorial,_June_2012.jpg Perhaps you could find a way to use the D language to honor them. Mike
May 24
parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 5/24/2019 9:00 PM, Mike Franklin wrote:
 On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 03:22:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:
 On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, but I have decided 
 to turn it into our own holiday to celebrate the D language.
I'm sure you mean well, but I will be spending D-Day remembering the sacrifice of these men: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings#/media/File:Normandy_American_Cemetery_and_Mem rial,_June_2012.jpg Perhaps you could find a way to use the D language to honor them.
I think it's alright. I was invited to teach a D seminar in Holland a few years back around Memorial Day. They were happy to conflate the two (it was their idea), and the Dutch revere the sacrifice of the Allies on D-Day. My father was a D-Day veteran, too, and I very much doubt he would have been offended by it. My Dutch friends were thrilled to find out my father was a vet, and they certainly would have shown him a good time had he come along. They even gave me some D-Day gifts. The D for D-Day thing was all in good fun all around. When I was a boy nobody cared my father was a vet. Everyone's dad was a vet. My neighbor next door was a paratrooper who'd lost his leg. My dad's best friend had his face burned off. It was kinda normal. But in his later years, people started to acknowledge the remaining veterans, and my father really enjoyed that. If you are lucky enough to know one, tell him thanks. You'll make his day.
May 24
next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
It's still a good idea, however, to acknowledge the real D-Day veterans on any 
event on D-Day.
May 24
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Murilo <murilomiranda92 hotmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 05:03:40 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:
 On 5/24/2019 9:00 PM, Mike Franklin wrote:
 On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 03:22:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:
 On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, 
 but I have decided to turn it into our own holiday to 
 celebrate the D language.
I'm sure you mean well, but I will be spending D-Day remembering the sacrifice of these men: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings#/media/File:Normandy_American_Cemetery_and_Memorial,_June_2012.jpg Perhaps you could find a way to use the D language to honor them.
I think it's alright. I was invited to teach a D seminar in Holland a few years back around Memorial Day. They were happy to conflate the two (it was their idea), and the Dutch revere the sacrifice of the Allies on D-Day. My father was a D-Day veteran, too, and I very much doubt he would have been offended by it. My Dutch friends were thrilled to find out my father was a vet, and they certainly would have shown him a good time had he come along. They even gave me some D-Day gifts. The D for D-Day thing was all in good fun all around. When I was a boy nobody cared my father was a vet. Everyone's dad was a vet. My neighbor next door was a paratrooper who'd lost his leg. My dad's best friend had his face burned off. It was kinda normal. But in his later years, people started to acknowledge the remaining veterans, and my father really enjoyed that. If you are lucky enough to know one, tell him thanks. You'll make his day.
Thanks, I tried it here in my country and people ignored both the Dlang event and D Day remembrance. I tried to gather everyone in a pub to give a talk but no one came. By the way, you are Walter Bright, the father of Dlang, it is such and honor to get to talk to you. I think it was a great idea you had to create this language, I really like it and I am trying to get more people to use it. By the way, you remind me of Breaking Bad cause your name sounds very similar to the name of the main character, Walter White. Cheers.
Jun 11
parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/11/2019 5:11 PM, Murilo wrote:
 Thanks, I tried it here in my country and people ignored both the Dlang event 
 and D Day remembrance. I tried to gather everyone in a pub to give a talk but
no 
 one came. By the way, you are Walter Bright, the father of Dlang, it is such
and 
 honor to get to talk to you. I think it was a great idea you had to create
this 
 language, I really like it and I am trying to get more people to use it. By
the 
 way, you remind me of Breaking Bad cause your name sounds very similar to the 
 name of the main character, Walter White. Cheers.
Thanks for giving it a try. I appreciate that! You aren't the first to notice Walter Bright / Walter White!
Jun 11
prev sibling parent reply "Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa)" <SeeWebsiteToContactMe semitwist.com> writes:
On 5/25/19 1:03 AM, Walter Bright wrote:
 On 5/24/2019 9:00 PM, Mike Franklin wrote:
 On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 03:22:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:
 On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, but I 
 have decided to turn it into our own holiday to celebrate the D 
 language.
I'm sure you mean well, but I will be spending D-Day remembering the sacrifice of these men: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings#/media/File:Normandy_American_Cemetery_and_Mem rial,_June_2012.jpg Perhaps you could find a way to use the D language to honor them.
I think it's alright. I was invited to teach a D seminar in Holland a few years back around Memorial Day. They were happy to conflate the two (it was their idea), and the Dutch revere the sacrifice of the Allies on D-Day. My father was a D-Day veteran, too, and I very much doubt he would have been offended by it. My Dutch friends were thrilled to find out my father was a vet, and they certainly would have shown him a good time had he come along. They even gave me some D-Day gifts. The D for D-Day thing was all in good fun all around. When I was a boy nobody cared my father was a vet. Everyone's dad was a vet. My neighbor next door was a paratrooper who'd lost his leg. My dad's best friend had his face burned off. It was kinda normal. But in his later years, people started to acknowledge the remaining veterans, and my father really enjoyed that. If you are lucky enough to know one, tell him thanks. You'll make his day.
Wise words, but I'll add another perspective also worth noting: My grandfather and *at least* one (to my immediate knowledge) of my great uncles were WW2 veterans. For all I know, they could have been D-Day, or any other involvement, but nobody in our family would ever know because they made a point of never talking about it (hence my uncertainty about how many more there may have been). One of them even declined a major award (purple star or metal of honor, was never clear on which)...or maybe it was that he was sent one, but never acknowledged it...either way, same sentiment. They're both gone now for unrelated old-age reasons, but from what I've been able to piece together, the idea was that their participation was something that needed to be done, but should NEVER involve taking pride in - as that would be an unethical validation of war and the unspeakable actions that it made necessary. (That, and the whole "true heroes don't survive" thing.) Frankly, I think that's a rather appropriate attitude to take toward such service.
Jun 11
parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/11/2019 11:03 PM, Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa) wrote:
 My grandfather and *at least* one (to my immediate knowledge) of my great
uncles 
 were WW2 veterans. For all I know, they could have been D-Day, or any other 
 involvement, but nobody in our family would ever know because they made a
point 
 of never talking about it (hence my uncertainty about how many more there may 
 have been). One of them even declined a major award (purple star or metal of 
 honor, was never clear on which)...or maybe it was that he was sent one, but 
 never acknowledged it...either way, same sentiment.
 
 They're both gone now for unrelated old-age reasons, but from what I've been 
 able to piece together, the idea was that their participation was something
that 
 needed to be done, but should NEVER involve taking pride in - as that would be 
 an unethical validation of war and the unspeakable actions that it made 
 necessary. (That, and the whole "true heroes don't survive" thing.) Frankly, I 
 think that's a rather appropriate attitude to take toward such service.
I understand the sentiment (as much as someone who was never in combat can), and respect your uncles for taking that path.
Jun 12
prev sibling next sibling parent reply NaN <divide by.zero> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 03:22:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:
 On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, but 
 I have decided to turn it into our own holiday to celebrate the 
 D language. So on this day please take the time to tell the 
 world about this language and to invite more people into our 
 community. I will try to give some talks at universities in 
 order to get the attention of the people. I suggest you all do 
 similar stuff. In the Dlang facebook group 
 https://www.facebook.com/groups/662119670846705/ which has 
 already reached 135 members, we will be doing lots of fun 
 stuff. Please show up and join the group to participate. I will 
 try to turn this into an actual holiday. I hope you can all 
 help me out.
It's one thing if your doing something D related and want to pay your respects to D-Day remembrance because it happens to be on the same day. But dont do it the other way around, dont hijack D-Day remembrance to push DLang.
May 25
parent reply Murilo <murilomiranda92 hotmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 09:27:48 UTC, NaN wrote:
 On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 03:22:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:
 On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, 
 but I have decided to turn it into our own holiday to 
 celebrate the D language. So on this day please take the time 
 to tell the world about this language and to invite more 
 people into our community. I will try to give some talks at 
 universities in order to get the attention of the people. I 
 suggest you all do similar stuff. In the Dlang facebook group 
 https://www.facebook.com/groups/662119670846705/ which has 
 already reached 135 members, we will be doing lots of fun 
 stuff. Please show up and join the group to participate. I 
 will try to turn this into an actual holiday. I hope you can 
 all help me out.
It's one thing if your doing something D related and want to pay your respects to D-Day remembrance because it happens to be on the same day. But dont do it the other way around, dont hijack D-Day remembrance to push DLang.
Sorry people, I did not mean to disregard the heros of D Day. It is because I am latin american and here nobody cares about the second WW cause we didn't participate much. I didn't know that in the US you people had all of that respect for D Day.
May 25
next sibling parent reply Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> writes:
On Sat, 2019-05-25 at 21:56 +0000, Murilo via Digitalmars-d-announce
wrote:
[=E2=80=A6]
=20
 Sorry people, I did not mean to disregard the heros of D Day. It=20
 is because I am latin american and here nobody cares about the=20
 second WW cause we didn't participate much. I didn't know that in=20
 the US you people had all of that respect for D Day.
It's not just the USA, D-Day is a very big deal in the UK and France. I suspect also The Netherlands and Belgium, and probably other places in western Europe, including Germany. Having said that, I believe there will be no problem hanging a D programming language marketing activity on the D-Day celebrations if the intention is to progress activities that help soldiers and/or victims associated with the D-Day landing, or indeed anyone indirectly associated with the landings.=20 The issue here is to be subtle and sympathetic/empathetic. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk
May 25
next sibling parent Les De Ridder <les lesderid.net> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 23:11:15 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 It's not just the USA, D-Day is a very big deal in the UK and 
 France. I suspect also The Netherlands and Belgium, and 
 probably other places in western Europe, including Germany.
Here in Belgium it gets some media attention, but people who aren't (close relatives of) D-Day veterans don't generally actively celebrate it.
May 25
prev sibling parent An American in Paris <mark twain.com> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 23:11:15 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 It's not just the USA, D-Day is a very big deal in the UK and 
 France.
D-Day it's Christmas day in France. When you get gifts.
May 25
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa)" <SeeWebsiteToContactMe semitwist.com> writes:
On 5/25/19 5:56 PM, Murilo wrote:
 
 Sorry people, I did not mean to disregard the heros of D Day. It is 
 because I am latin american and here nobody cares about the second WW 
 cause we didn't participate much. I didn't know that in the US you 
 people had all of that respect for D Day.
Don't know about Europe, but here in the US, an unfortunate part of the basic culture is that people tend to spend their entire lives here going around LOOKING for reasons to be offended, and by golly, they WILL be CERTAIN to find it whether it exists or not.
May 26
parent reply Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= <ola.fosheim.grostad gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 27 May 2019 at 00:12:51 UTC, Nick Sabalausky 
(Abscissa) wrote:
 Don't know about Europe, but here in the US, an unfortunate 
 part of the basic culture is that people tend to spend their 
 entire lives here going around LOOKING for reasons to be 
 offended, and by golly, they WILL be CERTAIN to find it whether 
 it exists or not.
Keep in mind that we in Europe still have a memory in society of nazi boots walking in our streets, ripping people out of their beds and sending them to concentration camps. And we know there are some people in our society that are willing to pick up that ideology. A small group perhaps, but there is a subconscious fear that those will rise again in a new shape or form. It wasn't only Germans that were nazis, they were everywhere. They were among our own people too. So, demanding respect for those memorial days is also a way to reject anyone who would play with that ideology in our own time.
May 26
parent reply "Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa)" <SeeWebsiteToContactMe semitwist.com> writes:
On 5/26/19 8:42 PM, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
 On Monday, 27 May 2019 at 00:12:51 UTC, Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa) wrote:
 Don't know about Europe, but here in the US, an unfortunate part of 
 the basic culture is that people tend to spend their entire lives here 
 going around LOOKING for reasons to be offended, and by golly, they 
 WILL be CERTAIN to find it whether it exists or not.
Keep in mind that we in Europe still have a memory in society of nazi boots walking in our streets, ripping people out of their beds and sending them to concentration camps. And we know there are some people in our society that are willing to pick up that ideology. A small group perhaps, but there is a subconscious fear that those will rise again in a new shape or form. It wasn't only Germans that were nazis, they were everywhere. They were among our own people too.
Here in the US we already have *leaders* with more or less that very same...I'm going to call it a mal-ideology. So, we're not in such terribly different boats. Arguably, US is closer to a repeat of that right now. Heck, look at the new "Federal ID" and modern TSA - it's basically 1930's "traveling papers" all over again, and just like then, everyone's too pumped full of nationalism bull ("U..S..A!..U..S..A!..") and scapegoat-searching to notice. Further still, that same Nazi, or ISIS, or whatever other evil fundamentalist mal-ideology ALL stems directly from getting all bent out of shape over what's benign and setting as sacred cows in defense against the benign. So congrats those pretending to be anti-Nazi while utilizing that to build the NEXT new fundamentalist regime.
May 26
parent reply Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= <ola.fosheim.grostad gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 27 May 2019 at 00:56:50 UTC, Nick Sabalausky 
(Abscissa) wrote:
 in defense against the benign. So congrats those pretending to 
 be anti-Nazi while utilizing that to build the NEXT new 
 fundamentalist regime.
I have to admit that I do use gmail, but I wonder if it is healthy that NSA have access to basically all letters exchanged by millions or billions of people across the globe… But then… gmail is so convenient… Convenience and a lack of principles is our weakness as a society. And we are all guilty at one level or another.
May 26
parent reply "Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa)" <SeeWebsiteToContactMe semitwist.com> writes:
On 5/26/19 9:16 PM, Ola Fosheim Grøstad wrote:
 On Monday, 27 May 2019 at 00:56:50 UTC, Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa) wrote:
 in defense against the benign. So congrats those pretending to be 
 anti-Nazi while utilizing that to build the NEXT new fundamentalist 
 regime.
I have to admit that I do use gmail, but I wonder if it is healthy that NSA have access to basically all letters exchanged by millions or billions of people across the globe… But then… gmail is so convenient… Convenience and a lack of principles is our weakness as a society. And we are all guilty at one level or another.
I run my own mail server, but I'll admit that has more to do with my own unique approach to spam prevention, and my dislike of webmail interfaces, than it does anything else. (And I do have gmail as a backup in case of server failure.) No argument here, I'm just as guilty of the occasional sacrifice of principles for convenience as any other normally-headstrong b****rd (I didn't used to be...but then my 20's ended, and most of my 30's, and wouldn't you know...I ran out of my double-dose of teenage angst ;) Just wanna get by now, like any stereotypical late-30-something... ;) ) It's extremely difficult in modern society to stick to principles that matter. It really does put you at a notable disadvantage, which, I imagine, is why most people never even give it a second thought to begin with. At least in the US, I've become convinced this is (at least in large part) a fundamental, inseparable, consequence of the legal guidelines ruling corporate entities (namely, the fact that profit is, by law, *required* to be a corporation's top priority). I suspect our closest hope may lie with something like this: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_purpose_corporation> Although, even that only seems a mere "step in the right direction", rather than a solution...(Under it, ethical/societal matters to be weighed must be spelled out during incorporation, otherwise they're still not legally permitted to be considered in decision-making, and there's apparently no requirement for even having any such clauses at all). But anything *better* than that (or even full-50-state-deployment as-is) is unlikely to ever happen in the US: Anything that doesn't directly facilitate "money is power, might makes right" just gets labeled "communist" or "socialist" and rejected outright by the nationalist rednecks we've been overrun by ever since 9/11. (Go figure, they attack us...and we respond by throwing away any credibility we ever had. Figures, coming from the same fine folks who brought the world such hits as "Puritanism", "Witch Trials" and "Shorten a War by Nuking Civilians - But Still Claim The Moral High-Ground")
May 26
next sibling parent Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= <ola.fosheim.grostad gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 27 May 2019 at 05:34:55 UTC, Nick Sabalausky 
(Abscissa) wrote:
 I suspect our closest hope may lie with something like this: 
 <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_purpose_corporation> 
 Although, even that only seems a mere "step in the right 
 direction", rather than a solution...(Under it,
It is hard to tell. IKEA is a foundation, it's creator insists that it is real, others might say that it is so for taxation reasons. Certainly for profit, yet has some social profile by not being "snobbish". Here in Norway the COOP has become quite big over the years, but they are very much for profit, although are technically owned by their customers. In the US you have FSF though, which totally changed the software industry in the 90s with the GPL. Granted BSD has since then gained ground, but I don't think that would have happened without the GPL to the same extent. I think the GPL created some sort of competition for attention in the software sector? GCC also totally undercut commercial compilers… Kinda funny. (Unless you are a compiler publisher…)
 the US: Anything that doesn't directly facilitate "money is 
 power, might makes right" just gets labeled "communist" or 
 "socialist" and rejected outright by the nationalist rednecks 
 we've been overrun by ever since 9/11. (Go figure, they attack
Well, there was a lot of brainwashing on both sides during the cold war (until to 1990). It takes time for it to fade away, although the younger US generation that I see in youtube comment fields appears to be openminded?
 had. Figures, coming from the same fine folks who brought the 
 world such hits as "Puritanism", "Witch Trials" and "Shorten a
I think our situation is better when smaller parties get a say. When there is two big parties that switch roles then they become too smug, when a big party has to beg a small party for support then they become more humble… But I guess parliamentarism would be difficult to establish in the US as the constitution seems to be revered by many as holy.
May 27
prev sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
This is getting way off topic, guys.
May 27
prev sibling parent Mike Franklin <slavo5150 yahoo.com> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 21:56:57 UTC, Murilo wrote:

 Sorry people
It's ok. I know you meant well, and we're happy to have people in this community so passionate about D. Mike
May 27
prev sibling parent Basile B. <b2.temp gmx.com> writes:
On Saturday, 25 May 2019 at 03:22:50 UTC, Murilo wrote:
 On the 6th of June(6/6) we celebrate the D day on Normandy, but 
 I have decided to turn it into our own holiday to celebrate the 
 D language. So on this day please take the time to tell the 
 world about this language and to invite more people into our 
 community. I will try to give some talks at universities in 
 order to get the attention of the people. I suggest you all do 
 similar stuff. In the Dlang facebook group 
 https://www.facebook.com/groups/662119670846705/ which has 
 already reached 135 members, we will be doing lots of fun 
 stuff. Please show up and join the group to participate. I will 
 try to turn this into an actual holiday. I hope you can all 
 help me out.
I dont think it's a good idea. One of mine grandpa served in the french Marine when they destroyed the ships at Toulon. The other went from algeria, from a spanish colony, to here... This D day idea is completly stupid.
May 27