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digitalmars.D.announce - DStep 1.0.0

reply Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
I would like to announce a new major release of DStep, 1.0.0.

This release is the biggest release since the initial release. It has 
support for translating some of the preprocessor, like `#define` for 
contestants and function-like macros. It now supports preserving 
comments and support for one more platform has been added: Windows. Many 
more features have been added and bugs have been fixed, too many to 
mention here.

For those not familiar, DStep is a tool for automatically generating D 
bindings for C and Objective-C libraries. This is implemented by 
processing C or Objective-C header files and output D modules. DStep 
uses the Clang compiler as a library (libclang) to process the header files.

This release would not have been possible without Wojciech Szęszoł, the 
Google Summer of Code student that started to work on DStep during the 
summer of 2016 and still is contributing.

For the full changelog (this has been built up for over three years, so 
I'm sure things are missing), see the release page [1].

Binaries are available for macOS, Linux and Windows [1]. The Linux 
binary is completely statically linked and should work on any distro. 
The macOS binary is statically linked with libclang and doesn't have any 
additional dependencies besides the system libraries. The Windwos 
binaries require to install libclang.

[1] https://github.com/jacob-carlborg/dstep/releases/tag/v1.0.0

-- 
/Jacob Carlborg
Apr 22
next sibling parent reply Dennis <dkorpel gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 22 April 2019 at 11:02:24 UTC, Jacob Carlborg wrote:
 It now supports preserving comments and support for one more 
 platform has been added: Windows.
Huh, I've been using DStep on Windows back in January. I can't remember how I obtained the binary, but it's version 0.2.3-67-gdeabc63. It worked partially, but could not translate C function pointers to D's `function()` syntax, leaving a 'TODO' stub instead. Has that changed? I can't find anything about it in the release notes. In any case, glad to see the tool maturing!
Apr 22
parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2019-04-22 15:20, Dennis wrote:

 Huh, I've been using DStep on Windows back in January.
 I can't remember how I obtained the binary, but it's version 
 0.2.3-67-gdeabc63.
The Windows support was implemented during GSoC 2016. It just has never been a new release since then. I have created a few tags, for various reasons, since then, but no official release.
 It worked partially, but could not translate C function pointers to D's 
 `function()` syntax, leaving a 'TODO' stub instead.
 Has that changed? I can't find anything about it in the release notes.
Translating function pointers has probably been supported since the first release. There are tests for this. If there's something that is not working, please file a bug at [1]. Ideally with a minimal test case with the C code and the expected D code. [1] https://github.com/jacob-carlborg/dstep/issues -- /Jacob Carlborg
Apr 22
prev sibling parent reply =?iso-8859-1?Q?Robert_M._M=FCnch?= <robert.muench saphirion.com> writes:
On 2019-04-22 11:02:24 +0000, Jacob Carlborg said:

 ... and support for one more platform has been added: Windows...
Are there are any functional differences between the platforms? Or can I just use the OSX version and use the generated .d files with the DMD Windows version too? -- Robert M. Mnch http://www.saphirion.com smarter | better | faster
Apr 26
parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2019-04-26 10:33, Robert M. Mnch wrote:

 Are there are any functional differences between the platforms?
The short answer is yes.
 Or can I just use the OSX version and use the generated .d files with the DMD
 Windows version too?
The longer answer is that it depends. DStep behaves the same way as the compiler (Clang in this case). That means that there are different predefined macro constants for different platforms. For example: #if _WIN32 #include <windows.h> DWORD foo(); #else int foo(); #endif If you run DStep on Windows it will output: extern (C): DWORD foo(); But on any other platform it will output: extern (C): int foo(); So it's a question if the header files contain any code like the above. The bindings that DStep uses for libclang are generated on macOS but are used unchanged on Windows and Linux as well. But these are the most forgiven headers that I've seen when it comes to create bindings. -- /Jacob Carlborg
Apr 27