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digitalmars.D.announce - Cross-compiler targeting macOS

reply Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:


I would like to announce a new project I'm working on: 
docker-ldc-darwin [1]. The project consists of a Dockerfile for 
building a Docker image which has all the necessary tools to 
cross-compile D applications targeting macOS x86-64.



* Uses Apple's ld64 linker so all features that are being used 
when linking on macOS should work. No reliance on custom linkers 
that need to be kept up to date with the system linker
* Ships with the full macOS SDK (for macOS version 10.15.4)
* No reliance on hacks like allowing undefined symbols when 
linking like Zig and Rust does
* Minimal Docker image. Only the exact files that are required to 
run the compiler and linker are included. Not even a shell is 
included
* The Docker image, all tools and resources are fully 
reproducible and automated. No manual steps involved of uploading 
to random cloud storage accounts

The following tools are included:

* dub
* ldc2
* ldmd2
* rdmd
* ld64 (linker)
* clang (C compiler, used for linking)





* [git](https://git-scm.com)
* [Docker](https://www.docker.com)



Follow the steps below to build the Docker images by running the 
commands in
the terminal:

1. Clone the git repository:
     ```
     git clone 
https://github.com/d-cross-compiler/docker-ldc-darwin && cd 
docker-ldc-darwin
     ```
1. Build the Docker image:
     ```
     docker build -t ldc-x86_64-apple-macos .
     ```



By default, the `ldc2` compiler will be invoked.



Compile Hello World:

```
$ uname
Darwin
$ cat <<EOF > main.d
import std;

void main()
{
     writeln("Hello World");
}
EOF
$ docker run --rm -v "$(pwd):/work" ldc-x86_64-apple-macos main.d
$ ./main
Hello World
```

For more information and examples, see the readme [1].

[1] https://github.com/d-cross-compiler/docker-ldc-darwin

--
/Jacob Carlborg
Apr 07
next sibling parent "H. S. Teoh" <hsteoh quickfur.ath.cx> writes:
On Wed, Apr 07, 2021 at 12:24:40PM +0000, Jacob Carlborg via
Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:

 
 I would like to announce a new project I'm working on:
 docker-ldc-darwin [1]. The project consists of a Dockerfile for
 building a Docker image which has all the necessary tools to
 cross-compile D applications targeting macOS x86-64.
[...] Thanks!!! This is what I've been looking for, for a long time! T -- Holding a grudge is like drinking poison and hoping the other person dies. -- seen on the 'Net
Apr 07
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Guillaume Piolat <first.name spam.org> writes:
On Wednesday, 7 April 2021 at 12:24:40 UTC, Jacob Carlborg wrote:


 I would like to announce a new project I'm working on: 
 docker-ldc-darwin [1]. The project consists of a Dockerfile for 
 building a Docker image which has all the necessary tools to 
 cross-compile D applications targeting macOS x86-64.
Dumb question maybe but: in what use cases should this be used?
Apr 07
parent reply Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2021-04-07 17:27, Guillaume Piolat wrote:

 Dumb question maybe but: in what use cases should this be used?
I don't know, ask H. S. Teoh :D. I know some people have asked for it. I did it mostly because I knew how to do it and do it properly. I general I don't see the point to cross-compile (unless it's required, like mobile an embedded), because it seems like people want to use cross-compiling because they don't have the target system. But eventually you need to test the result and then you do need the target system to be able to run it. But perhaps if you target Windows you can then use Wine to run the executable. Seem to be something similar for macOS [1]. But if you can run the result using Wine you should be able to run the compiler using Wine as well. Perhaps it's less of a hassle to cross-compile, I don't know. If you're targeting Linux on non-native architectures you can use qemu. Seems pretty easy if you have a statically linked binary and use qemu user emulation. There's also free public CI services that target macOS, no need to cross-compile and it can run the code as well. I did have a use case at my previous job. The production systems were running Linux but all developers were using macOS. We created a custom tool for the developers, which then needed to target macOS. It was a GUI application so Docker wasn't an option. We only had access to Linux CI runners so I used cross-compiling. It couldn't test the result, but at least it could build it and publish it. That's when I setup the first incarnation of this project [2]. In this new incarnation, I've fixed the main problem of the first incarnation: reproducibility. [1] https://www.darlinghq.org [2] https://github.com/jacob-carlborg/docker-ldc-darwin -- /Jacob Carlborg
Apr 08
parent reply "H. S. Teoh" <hsteoh quickfur.ath.cx> writes:
On Thu, Apr 08, 2021 at 10:23:27AM +0200, Jacob Carlborg via
Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 On 2021-04-07 17:27, Guillaume Piolat wrote:
 
 Dumb question maybe but: in what use cases should this be used?
I don't know, ask H. S. Teoh :D. I know some people have asked for it. I did it mostly because I knew how to do it and do it properly. I general I don't see the point to cross-compile (unless it's required, like mobile an embedded), because it seems like people want to use cross-compiling because they don't have the target system. But eventually you need to test the result and then you do need the target system to be able to run it.
That's the main reason for me, anyway, can't speak for others. And yes, ideally you'd want to own the target system as well so that you can test it, but sometimes you just want to share a personal project with someone running on say MacOS, and it doesn't seem to make sense to buy a Mac just to be able to share that one program. So cross-compiling would be a much better solution.
 But perhaps if you target Windows you can then use Wine to run the
 executable.  Seem to be something similar for macOS [1]. But if you
 can run the result using Wine you should be able to run the compiler
 using Wine as well. Perhaps it's less of a hassle to cross-compile, I
 don't know.
IME, test results from Wine are not reliable. It's a good first pass to make sure you didn't do anything obviously broken, but just because something runs well in Wine does not guarantee it will run well on an actual Windows box. But still, even then I'd rather cross-compile, because then I can just do everything on a single development machine instead of having to install and maintain multiple development toolchains across different machines. Otherwise it's just a lot of unnecessary hassle having to sync source code between different development environments and switch between computers just to build a set of release binaries, say. On a single development environment with cross-compilation, I can just setup the build script to build all binaries for all platforms at once, without any of these hassles.
 If you're targeting Linux on non-native architectures you can use
 qemu.  Seems pretty easy if you have a statically linked binary and
 use qemu user emulation.
For testing, yeah I'd do that. For builds, I'd rather centralize everything on a single development environment.
 There's also free public CI services that target macOS, no need to
 cross-compile and it can run the code as well.
That's good to know. Still, I'd rather keep things independent of a network connection in case I ever find myself in a place without one.
 I did have a use case at my previous job. The production systems were
 running Linux but all developers were using macOS. We created a custom
 tool for the developers, which then needed to target macOS. It was a
 GUI application so Docker wasn't an option. We only had access to
 Linux CI runners so I used cross-compiling. It couldn't test the
 result, but at least it could build it and publish it. That's when I
 setup the first incarnation of this project [2]. In this new
 incarnation, I've fixed the main problem of the first incarnation:
 reproducibility.
 
 [1] https://www.darlinghq.org
 [2] https://github.com/jacob-carlborg/docker-ldc-darwin
[...] Thanks for this, it is very helpful. T -- Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.
Apr 08
parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2021-04-08 18:36, H. S. Teoh wrote:

 Thanks for this, it is very helpful.
You're welcome. I'm glad that it's useful to someone. I just created a tag [1] (no changes yet), if I would like to make some changes in the future. [1] https://github.com/d-cross-compiler/docker-ldc-darwin/tree/v0.0.1 -- /Jacob Carlborg
Apr 09
prev sibling parent reply kinke <noone nowhere.com> writes:
Thanks Jacob, I'm sure this was quite a bit of work, and opening 
up proprietary SDKs for non-native systems is always welcome. 
Thumbs up!
Apr 10
parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2021-04-10 15:50, kinke wrote:
 Thanks Jacob, I'm sure this was quite a bit of work, and opening up 
 proprietary SDKs for non-native systems is always welcome. Thumbs up!
Thanks. -- /Jacob Carlborg
Apr 11