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digitalmars.D - What, if any, do you dislike about GUI like Qt, Gtk+, C#'s WinForms,

reply A32007 <business.mongol2525 gmail.com> writes:
So guys what, if any, do you dislike about GUI like Qt, Gtk+, 

Jan 06
next sibling parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2021-01-06 22:24, A32007 wrote:

 WinForms, etc and you would do differently with D?
I dislike that they're not using the native drawing operations of the operating system. That is, the applications will not have a native look and feel. -- /Jacob Carlborg
Jan 07
prev sibling parent reply Guillaume Piolat <first.last gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 6 January 2021 at 21:24:08 UTC, A32007 wrote:
 So guys what, if any, do you dislike about GUI like Qt, Gtk+, 

I don't use them because I find they come with a big dynlib runtime. Though in this day and age it may not be a problem at all.
Jan 07
parent reply sighoya <sighoya gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 January 2021 at 10:44:39 UTC, Guillaume Piolat 
wrote:

 I don't use them because I find they come with a big dynlib 
 runtime. Though in this day and age it may not be a problem at 
 all.
Isn't it possible to statically link qt applications nowadays? I don't know though if this is a good idea
Jan 07
parent reply evilrat <evilrat666 gmail.com> writes:
Imho all this talk about native look & feel is just lame, just 
look at professional software, it is basically the norm to have a 
custom uniform style at least across desktop platforms.
In fact I've seen many times on the internets how much users are 
grateful to devs when it suddenly happens to work on 
another(replacement) machine with unfamiliar OS installed.

Also, compare "default" OS styles(is there actually single 
default on Windows now? What about linux? No, don't tell me about 
GTK) for example MS paint or notepad and Mac Finder. (They all 
looks to me like if they've come from prehistoric times)



On Thursday, 7 January 2021 at 11:28:57 UTC, sighoya wrote:
 On Thursday, 7 January 2021 at 10:44:39 UTC, Guillaume Piolat 
 wrote:

 I don't use them because I find they come with a big dynlib 
 runtime. Though in this day and age it may not be a problem at 
 all.
Isn't it possible to statically link qt applications nowadays? I don't know though if this is a good idea
It was for 10+ years, just makes your code GPL infected. And IIRC since that moment when Nokia sold Qt there was is even more licensing restrictions added.
Jan 07
parent reply Guillaume Piolat <first.last gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 January 2021 at 12:13:47 UTC, evilrat wrote:
 Imho all this talk about native look & feel is just lame, just 
 look at professional software, it is basically the norm to have 
 a custom uniform style at least across desktop platforms.
 In fact I've seen many times on the internets how much users 
 are grateful to devs when it suddenly happens to work on 
 another(replacement) machine with unfamiliar OS installed.
+1, video games have non-native widgets Nobody would say they are not user friendly
Jan 07
parent reply Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= <ola.fosheim.grostad gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 January 2021 at 13:22:28 UTC, Guillaume Piolat 
wrote:
 On Thursday, 7 January 2021 at 12:13:47 UTC, evilrat wrote:
 Imho all this talk about native look & feel is just lame, just 
 look at professional software, it is basically the norm to 
 have a custom uniform style at least across desktop platforms.
 In fact I've seen many times on the internets how much users 
 are grateful to devs when it suddenly happens to work on 
 another(replacement) machine with unfamiliar OS installed.
+1, video games have non-native widgets Nobody would say they are not user friendly
I think many elderly people would object to that statement. :-) Games are different though. They are basically designed in the opposite direction: what kind of fancy interface can we have, ok, let's fill this cool interface with content... Whereas a productivity application is more like, we have all this content that we need to access, how can we make it available in a way that works for people with many levels of digital competence and in a way that allows us to continually add to it? Anyhow, most users are more familiar with web content than native apps these days... Maybe Google Material is the best option.
Jan 07
parent reply ryuukk_ <ryuukk_ gmail.com> writes:
electron and flutter proved one thing:

people don't mind non-native UIs, they want great UX and great 
styling, consistency across services, not across the whole OS, 
specially when the OS has ugly UI (windows 10 for example)
Jan 07
parent Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= <ola.fosheim.grostad gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 January 2021 at 20:43:34 UTC, ryuukk_ wrote:
 electron and flutter proved one thing:

 people don't mind non-native UIs, they want great UX and great 
 styling, consistency across services, not across the whole OS, 
 specially when the OS has ugly UI (windows 10 for example)
Yeah. There is probably also some advantage in the GUI mechanisms in browsers being somewhat limited so that learning using web apps does not get overly complicate. Some native GUIs actually have more of a learning curve... in comparison.
Jan 07