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digitalmars.D.learn - sub() in D2?

reply adamss3 <sadams58 woh.rr.com> writes:
Is there a direct analog to sub() in D2?  The replace() function in regex
seems a bit overkill for what I need.  I just want to substitute one string
for another.
Jan 30 2012
next sibling parent reply "Adam D. Ruppe" <destructionator gmail.com> writes:
http://www.d-programming-language.org/phobos/std_array.html#replace

import std.array;
string a = "test";
string b = a.replace("t, "p");
assert(b == "pesp");
Jan 30 2012
parent reply adamss3 <sadams58 woh.rr.com> writes:
Thanks.
Jan 30 2012
parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2012-01-31 00:09, Marco Leise wrote:
 Am 30.01.2012, 16:57 Uhr, schrieb adamss3 <sadams58 woh.rr.com>:

 Thanks.

The only downside of strings being arrays: a lot of typical string functions are in std.array. :D

If everything in std.array works for strings as well, shouldn't std.string publicly import std.array? -- /Jacob Carlborg
Jan 30 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Marco Leise" <Marco.Leise gmx.de> writes:
Am 30.01.2012, 16:57 Uhr, schrieb adamss3 <sadams58 woh.rr.com>:

 Thanks.

The only downside of strings being arrays: a lot of typical string functions are in std.array. :D
Jan 30 2012
prev sibling parent Jonathan M Davis <jmdavisProg gmx.com> writes:
On Tuesday, January 31, 2012 08:16:25 Jacob Carlborg wrote:
 On 2012-01-31 00:09, Marco Leise wrote:
 Am 30.01.2012, 16:57 Uhr, schrieb adamss3 <sadams58 woh.rr.com>:
 Thanks.

The only downside of strings being arrays: a lot of typical string functions are in std.array. :D

If everything in std.array works for strings as well, shouldn't std.string publicly import std.array?

You could quickly get into similar arguments with std.range and std.algorithm, as well as std.ascii and std.uni. Ultimately, functions are organized into modules based on where they make the most sense to ones writing the functions, and you import the modules that have what you need. You can't get away from having to know what module has what you need unless we get something like std.all which publicly imports _everything_. And the folks who get paranoid about importing symbols that they don't need are going to tend to want modules to include _less_ rather than more. So, there's that to contend with as well. No matter how you organize the functions, there will always been problems with it. Ultimately, you just learn where what you need is. And in this case, a string is an array, so as long as you understand that, std.array should definitely be one of the places that you look for functions when messing with strings, not just std.string. - Jonathan M Davis
Jan 30 2012