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digitalmars.D.learn - std.format expand "%s"

reply jmh530 <john.michael.hall gmail.com> writes:
I'm playing around with std.format and I'm trying to figure out 
if there is any way to identify what "%s" should expand to.

So for instance:
int x = 1;
auto result = x.format!"%s";

I would know that result="1". I could run "1" through 
unformatValue and get back 1. I'm looking to see if there is a 
way to get back "%d": really a function would be like f(x, "%s") 
produces "%d".

Is there anything like that in std.format?
Aug 20
parent reply Steven Schveighoffer <schveiguy yahoo.com> writes:
On 8/20/17 9:52 PM, jmh530 wrote:
 I'm playing around with std.format and I'm trying to figure out if there 
 is any way to identify what "%s" should expand to.
 
 So for instance:
 int x = 1;
 auto result = x.format!"%s";
 
 I would know that result="1". I could run "1" through unformatValue and 
 get back 1. I'm looking to see if there is a way to get back "%d": 
 really a function would be like f(x, "%s") produces "%d".
 
 Is there anything like that in std.format?
Well, for most things, %s does not do the same thing as another specifier. It's only integers, which format the same as %d, and floating points, which format the same as %g. For all others, the format is specified as %s. I think what you really want is just isFloatingPoint or isIntegral. -Steve
Aug 21
parent reply jmh530 <john.michael.hall gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 21 August 2017 at 13:57:01 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
wrote:
 Well, for most things, %s does not do the same thing as another 
 specifier. It's only integers, which format the same as %d, and 
 floating points, which format the same as %g.

 For all others, the format is specified as %s.

 I think what you really want is just isFloatingPoint or 
 isIntegral.

 -Steve
I'm pretty sure that isFloatingPoint/isIntegral is not what I need, but I'm also not sure if what I was asking for above is needed either. So I'll just drop it for now.
Aug 21
parent reply Steven Schveighoffer <schveiguy yahoo.com> writes:
On 8/21/17 10:58 AM, jmh530 wrote:
 On Monday, 21 August 2017 at 13:57:01 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer wrote:
 Well, for most things, %s does not do the same thing as another 
 specifier. It's only integers, which format the same as %d, and 
 floating points, which format the same as %g.

 For all others, the format is specified as %s.

 I think what you really want is just isFloatingPoint or isIntegral.
I'm pretty sure that isFloatingPoint/isIntegral is not what I need, but I'm also not sure if what I was asking for above is needed either. So I'll just drop it for now.
What I mean is that %s goes to %d for isIntegral!(typeof(x)), and %s goes to %g for isFloatingPoint!(typeof(x)), and stays as %s for everything else. Given this, you could probably write the function you were looking for. -Steve
Aug 21
parent jmh530 <john.michael.hall gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 21 August 2017 at 15:39:04 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
wrote:
 What I mean is that %s goes to %d for isIntegral!(typeof(x)), 
 and %s goes to %g for isFloatingPoint!(typeof(x)), and stays as 
 %s for everything else.

 Given this, you could probably write the function you were 
 looking for.

 -Steve
I realized I was more interested in the length of the result than the type.
Aug 22