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digitalmars.D.learn - Search elemnt in Compile-time Argument List of strings

reply ParticlePeter <ParticlePeter gmx.de> writes:
I want to generate one function for any struct data member, but 
also want to be able to skip few of the members. The first part 
works, but I have some trouble with the skipping.

I pass the struct type and a Compile-time Argument List of 
strings as template arguments to a template function, list all 
members of the struct and compare each member to each element of 
the List. If the member is in the List skip processing of that 
member. Pretty straight forward ... should be.

// First approach doesn't work:
// Error: variable skip cannot be read at compile time
void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) {
     bool skip = false;
     foreach( arg; ignore )
       skip = skip || ( arg == member );

     static if( !skip ) {
       // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as 
string mixin
     }
   }
}

// Second approach, get warnings for every skipped member
// and every line after the return statement:
// Warning: statement is not reachable
void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) {
     foreach( arg; ignore )
       static if( arg == member )
         return;
     // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as 
string mixin
   }
}

So how can I achieve my goal the right way?
Jul 26 2016
next sibling parent ParticlePeter <ParticlePeter gmx.de> writes:
On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 19:30:18 UTC, ParticlePeter wrote:
 // Second approach, get warnings for every skipped member
 // and every line after the return statement:
 // Warning: statement is not reachable
 void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) {
     foreach( arg; ignore )
       static if( arg == member )
         return;
     // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as 
 string mixin
   }
 }

 So how can I achieve my goal the right way?
I just realized that the second approach, despite the warnings, does not achieve its goal. The members are still forwarded. So I should rather ask how I could filter the members at all.
Jul 26 2016
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Steven Schveighoffer <schveiguy yahoo.com> writes:
On 7/26/16 3:30 PM, ParticlePeter wrote:
 I want to generate one function for any struct data member, but also
 want to be able to skip few of the members. The first part works, but I
 have some trouble with the skipping.

 I pass the struct type and a Compile-time Argument List of strings as
 template arguments to a template function, list all members of the
 struct and compare each member to each element of the List. If the
 member is in the List skip processing of that member. Pretty straight
 forward ... should be.

 // First approach doesn't work:
 // Error: variable skip cannot be read at compile time
 void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) {
     bool skip = false;
     foreach( arg; ignore )
       skip = skip || ( arg == member );

     static if( !skip ) {
       // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as string mixin
     }
   }
 }

 // Second approach, get warnings for every skipped member
 // and every line after the return statement:
 // Warning: statement is not reachable
 void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) {
     foreach( arg; ignore )
       static if( arg == member )
         return;
     // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as string mixin
   }
 }

 So how can I achieve my goal the right way?
You are doing it *almost* right. What you need to remember is what is compile time, and what is runtime. In order to declare something is readable at compile-time, you need to have an expression that only involves compile-time constants. This means you need to process *all* the ignore's at once, or process the "end of the loop" after you haven't found it. Here is one way to do it: void processMember( T, ignore... )() { foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) { // this is a compile-time list, so it's a static foreach. foreach(i, arg; ignore ){ // i is the index into the ignore tuple static if( arg == member ) break; // break out of the foreach loop, need to ignore it. else static if(i + 1 == arg.length) // this is the last element! { // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as string mixin } } } } Another way is to use std.meta.anySatisfy (http://dlang.org/phobos/std_meta.html#.anySatisfy), which can apply a template to each element in a compile-time list to see if any match: template skipper(string target) { enum shouldSkip(string s) = (s == target); } // replace your bool skip = ... with this: enum skip = anySatisfy!(skipper!(member).shouldSkip, ignore); It's a bit weird to work on these compile-time things, but they are so cool when you look at what is available in std.meta and std.traits :) -Steve
Jul 26 2016
next sibling parent ParticlePeter <ParticlePeter gmx.de> writes:
On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 20:18:48 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
wrote:
...
Thanks a lot for this really cool and detailed explanation 
(upvoting!).

 It's a bit weird to work on these compile-time things, but they 
 are so cool when you look at what is available in std.meta and 
 std.traits :)
Agreed with each aspect. When I (just) read Philippe Sigaud's D Templates Tutorial I didn't get a thing. Important thing is getting your hands dirty, then it comes slowly.
Jul 26 2016
prev sibling parent reply ParticlePeter <ParticlePeter gmx.de> writes:
On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 20:18:48 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
wrote:
...
 void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) { // this is a 
 compile-time list, so it's a static foreach.
     foreach(i, arg; ignore ){ // i is the index into the ignore 
 tuple
       static if( arg == member ) break; // break out of the 
 foreach loop, need to ignore it.
       else static if(i + 1 == arg.length) // this is the last 
 element!
       {
       // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as 
 string mixin
       }
     }
   }
 }
There is one problem with this approach, ignore might be empty (I should have mentioned it). Would you know a workaround for that case as well?
Jul 26 2016
next sibling parent reply =?UTF-8?Q?Ali_=c3=87ehreli?= <acehreli yahoo.com> writes:
On 07/26/2016 01:58 PM, ParticlePeter wrote:
 On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 20:18:48 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer wrote:
 ...
 void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) { // this is a
 compile-time list, so it's a static foreach.
     foreach(i, arg; ignore ){ // i is the index into the ignore tuple
       static if( arg == member ) break; // break out of the foreach
 loop, need to ignore it.
       else static if(i + 1 == arg.length) // this is the last element!
       {
       // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as string
 mixin
       }
     }
   }
 }
There is one problem with this approach, ignore might be empty (I should have mentioned it). Would you know a workaround for that case as well?
It should work for empty ignore. Can you show with a short example please. Ali
Jul 26 2016
parent reply ParticlePeter <ParticlePeter gmx.de> writes:
On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 21:01:19 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:
 On 07/26/2016 01:58 PM, ParticlePeter wrote:
 On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 20:18:48 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
 wrote:
 ...
 void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) { // this is a
 compile-time list, so it's a static foreach.
     foreach(i, arg; ignore ){ // i is the index into the 
 ignore tuple
       static if( arg == member ) break; // break out of the 
 foreach
 loop, need to ignore it.
       else static if(i + 1 == arg.length) // this is the last 
 element!
       {
       // process member here, generate e.g. setter function 
 as string
 mixin
       }
     }
   }
 }
There is one problem with this approach, ignore might be empty (I should have mentioned it). Would you know a workaround for that case as well?
It should work for empty ignore. Can you show with a short example please. Ali
First of all there seems to be a typo, it should not be: else static if(i + 1 == arg.length) ignore must be used instead of arg, as arg.length is the length of a string: else static if(i + 1 == ignore.length) if ignore is empty, its length is 0, so that the statement would always evaluate to false. Btw, if ignore is not empty, only the last element (arg) is skipped.
Jul 26 2016
parent ParticlePeter <ParticlePeter gmx.de> writes:
On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 21:20:18 UTC, ParticlePeter wrote:
...
 First of all there seems to be a typo, it should not be:
   else static if(i + 1 == arg.length)

 ignore must be used instead of arg, as arg.length is the length 
 of a string:
   else static if(i + 1 == ignore.length)

 if ignore is empty, its length is 0, so that the statement 
 would always evaluate to false.

 Btw, if ignore is not empty, only the last element (arg) is 
 skipped.
Test: void processMember( T, ignore... )() { foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) { foreach( i, arg; ignore ) { // i is the index into the ignore tuple static if( arg == member ) break; // break out of the foreach loop, ... else static if( i + 1 == ignore.length ) { // this is the last element! pragma( msg, "processing ", member ); } } } } struct Foo { float a, b, c, d; } int main() { processMember!( Foo ); // nada processMember!( Foo, "c" ); // works processMember!( Foo, "c", "b" ); // skips only b }
Jul 26 2016
prev sibling parent Steven Schveighoffer <schveiguy yahoo.com> writes:
On 7/26/16 4:58 PM, ParticlePeter wrote:
 On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 20:18:48 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer wrote:
 ....
 void processMember( T, ignore... )() {
   foreach( member; __traits( allMembers, T )) { // this is a
 compile-time list, so it's a static foreach.
     foreach(i, arg; ignore ){ // i is the index into the ignore tuple
       static if( arg == member ) break; // break out of the foreach
 loop, need to ignore it.
       else static if(i + 1 == arg.length) // this is the last element!
       {
       // process member here, generate e.g. setter function as string
 mixin
       }
     }
   }
 }
There is one problem with this approach, ignore might be empty (I should have mentioned it). Would you know a workaround for that case as well?
Hm... good point :) Here is a workaround: foreach(i, arg; AliasSeq!(ignore, "SENTINEL")) static if(i == ignore.length) { // process, it's good } else static if(arg == member) break; -Steve
Jul 26 2016
prev sibling parent ag0aep6g <anonymous example.com> writes:
On 07/26/2016 09:30 PM, ParticlePeter wrote:
 So how can I achieve my goal the right way?
Here's one with CTFE: ---- void processMember(T, ignore...)() { import std.algorithm: canFind, filter; import std.meta: aliasSeqOf; enum selectedMembers = aliasSeqOf!( [__traits(allMembers, T)].filter!(m => ![ignore].canFind(m)) ); foreach (member; selectedMembers) { /* process member here, generate e.g. setter function as string mixin */ } } ----
Jul 27 2016