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digitalmars.D.learn - Ranges suck!

reply Your name <Your email.address> writes:
Every time I go to use something like strip it bitches and gives 
me errors. Why can't I simply do somestring.strip("\n")???

import std.string would be the likely strip yet it takes a range 
and somestring, for some retarded reason, isn't a range. strip 
isn't the only function that does this. Who ever implemented 
ranges the way they did needs to get their head checked!

How bout you make these functions work on strings automatically 
so it works without moronic errors. Every sane programming(not 
including D) does not try to toy with the programmer and make 
them figure out retarded rules that make no sense logically. 
strip is meant to be used on strings in most cases so having 
direct and easy access to it should override trying to force 
ranges down my throat. I'm not a porn star. No other language 
plays these guys, why does D do it?

Ok, so I know what your saying "Oh, but strip("\n") should be 
strip()! Your a moron RTFM!" But why then force me to strip for 
nothing? Why not pay me? e.g., let me strip for something like 
strip("x")?

Oh, chomp? Is that the function I'm suppose to use? Seriously? 
Was the D lib written by someone with a pacman fetish?
Sep 14
next sibling parent Brad Anderson <eco gnuk.net> writes:
On Thursday, 14 September 2017 at 23:53:20 UTC, Your name wrote:
 Every time I go to use something like strip it bitches and 
 gives me errors. Why can't I simply do somestring.strip("\n")???

 import std.string would be the likely strip yet it takes a 
 range and somestring, for some retarded reason, isn't a range. 
 strip isn't the only function that does this. Who ever 
 implemented ranges the way they did needs to get their head 
 checked!
It's not really a range issue. It's that there are two strips. One in std.string and one in std.algorithm. The latter which lets you define what to strip rather than just whitespace is what you are looking for and works as you've written. The former is there for legacy reasons and we can hopefully get rid of it in the future to avoid this confusion. I'd also say that you don't seem to be grasping a pretty fundamental D concept yet. std.string.strip doesn't take two arguments, it takes one argument. The first set of parentheses is the template argument which is inferred from the regular argument using IFTI.
 [snip]
 Ok, so I know what your saying "Oh, but strip("\n") should be 
 strip()! Your a moron RTFM!" But why then force me to strip for 
 nothing? Why not pay me? e.g., let me strip for something like 
 strip("x")?
strip()! isn't valid syntax. If you want to strip all whitespace you can use std.string.strip (e.g., somestring.strip()). If you want to strip "x" you can use std.algorithm.strip (e.g., somestring.strip("x")). Pretty much like any other language minus the double function mess.
 Oh, chomp? Is that the function I'm suppose to use? Seriously? 
 Was the D lib written by someone with a pacman fetish?
chomp comes to D by way of perl. I don't know whether or not Larry Wall is into pacman or not.
Sep 14
prev sibling next sibling parent =?UTF-8?Q?Ali_=c3=87ehreli?= <acehreli yahoo.com> writes:
On 09/14/2017 04:53 PM, Your name wrote:

 Why can't I simply do somestring.strip("\n")???
Actually, you can but that's a different one: std.algorithm.strip and it takes the element type, so you should provide a char: somestring = somestring.strip('\n'); (Note: I lied about element type because it's actually dchar but let's not go there :) )
 import std.string would be the likely strip yet it takes a range and
 somestring, for some retarded reason, isn't a range.
It is a range but the error messages cannot be clearer unless the compiler is modified.
 strip isn't the
 only function that does this. Who ever implemented ranges the way they
 did needs to get their head checked!
I think this issue is more about templates. You see this more with ranges because they are all templates.
 How bout you make these functions work on strings automatically so it
 works without moronic errors. Every sane programming(not including D)
 does not try to toy with the programmer and make them figure out
 retarded rules that make no sense logically.
I'm sure there are strange usability issues in other programming languages as well. :)
 strip is meant to be used
 on strings in most cases so having direct and easy access to it should
 override trying to force ranges down my throat. I'm not a porn star. No
 other language plays these guys, why does D do it?
I think some of the reason is historical. Any organically grown thing necessarily has inconsistencies and compromises that are developed over time as new features are added, removed, or moved around. For example, many functions from the std.string module were moved to std.algorithm as those made sense for other ranges as well.
 Ok, so I know what your saying "Oh, but strip("\n") should be strip()!
 Your a moron RTFM!" But why then force me to strip for nothing? Why not
 pay me? e.g., let me strip for something like strip("x")?
Now you're teasing. ;)
 Oh, chomp? Is that the function I'm suppose to use? Seriously? Was the D
 lib written by someone with a pacman fetish?
Agreed overall but everything has reasons that made sense at some point to some people. Only languages like Go that had decades of time borrowing ideas from other languages and learning from their mistakes have a chance of avoiding this but even they have issues and limitations. Ali
Sep 14
prev sibling parent bitwise <bitwise.pvt gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 14 September 2017 at 23:53:20 UTC, Your name wrote:
 [...]
I understand your frustration. The fact that "inout" is actually a keyword makes it hard not to think that some very strange fetishes were at play during the creation of this language. As a whole though, the language is very usable, and has many great features not present in similar languages. Just this morning, I was able to replace a fairly large and ugly pile of code with this: import std.utf; foreach(c; myString.byUTF!dchar) { // ... }
Sep 15