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digitalmars.D.learn - New programming paradigm

reply EntangledQuanta <EQ universe.com> writes:
In coming up with a solution that maps enums to templates, I 
think it might provide a means to allow template like behavior at 
runtime. That is, type information is contained with in the enum 
which then can, with the use of compile time templates, be 
treated as dynamic behaviors.

Let me explain:

Take a variant type. It contains the "type" and the data. To 
simplify, we will treat look at it like

(pseudo-code, use your brain)

enum Type { int, float }

foo(void* Data, Type type);

The normal way to deal with this is a switch:

switch(type)
{
     case int: auto val = *(cast(int*)Data);
     case float: auto val = *(cast(float*)Data);
}


But what if the switch could be generated for us?

Instead of

foo(void* Data, Type type)
{
   switch(type)
   {
       case int: auto val = *(cast(int*)Data);
       case float: auto val = *(cast(float*)Data);
   }
}

we have

foo(T)(T* Data)
{

}


which, if we need to specialize on a type, we can do

foo(int* Data) { }
foo(float* Data) { }


One may claim that this isn't very useful because it's not much 
different than the switch because we might still have to do 
things like:

foo(T)(T* Data)
{
   static switch(T)
    {
      case int: break;
      case float: break;
    }
}

but note that it is a CT switch.

But, in fact, since we can specialize on the type we don't have 
to use switch and in some cases do not even need to specialize:

for example:

foo(T)(T* Data) { writeln(*Data); }

is a compile time template that is called with the correct type 
value at run-time due to the "magic" which I have yet to 
introduce.

Note that if we just use a standard runtime variant, writeln 
would see a variant, not the correct type that Data really is. 
This is the key difference and what makes this "technique" 
valuable. We can treat our dynamic variables as compile time 
types(use the compile time system) without much hassle. They fit 
naturally in it and we do not clutter our code switches. We can 
have a true auto/var like C# without the overhead of the IR. The 
cost, of course, is that switches are still used, they are 
generated behind the scenes though and the runtime cost is a few 
instructions that all switches have and that we cannot avoid.


To get a feel for what this new way of dealing with dynamic types 
might look like:

void foo(var y) { writeln(y); }

var x = "3"; // or possibly var!(string, int) for the explicit 
types used
foo(x);
x = 3;
foo(x);

(just pseudo code, don't take the syntax literally, that is not 
what is important)

While this example is trivial, the thing to note is that there is 
one foo declared, but two created at runtime. One for string and 
one for and int. It is like a variant, yet we don't have to do 
any testing. It is very similar to `dynamic` in C#, but better 
since actually can "know" the type at compile time, so to speak. 
It's not that we actually know, but that we write code as if we 
knew.. it's treated as if it's statically typed.

In fact, we still have to specify the possible types a value can 
take on(just like variant), but once that is done the switch 
statement can be generated and we just have to write our 
templated function to handle this new "type".

You can see some of the code here, which I won't repeat for sake 
of brevity:

https://forum.dlang.org/thread/qtnawzubqocllhacuokq forum.dlang.org

The thing to note, is that by defining foo in a specific way, the 
mixin generates a proxy that creates the switch statement for us. 
This deals with casting the type by using the type specifier and 
calling the template with it.

If the compiler were to use such a type as a first class citizen, 
we would have a very easy and natural way for dealing with 
dynamic types that can only have a finite number of type 
specializations. This should be the general case, although  I 
haven't looked at how it would work with oop. The cost is the 
same as any dynamic type... a switch statement, which is just a 
few extra cycles. (a lookup table could be used, of course, but 
not sure the benefit)


As far as I know, no other language actually does this. Those 
with dynamic types have a lot more overhead since they don't 
couple them with templates(since they are not a statically typed 
language).

Anyways, not a thoroughly thought out idea, but actually if it 
works well(I'm using the code I linked to and it works quite well 
for dealing with buffers that can take several different times. 
One function, no explicit switching in it) and could be 
implemented in the compiler, would probably be a very nice 
feature for D?

One of the downsides is code bloat. Having multiple var's 
increase the size O(n^m) since one has to deal with every 
combination. These result in very large nested switch 
structures... only O(m) to transverse at runtime though, but 
still takes up a lot of bits to represent.
Sep 03
next sibling parent reply EntangledQuanta <EQ universe.com> writes:
So, no body thinks this is a useful idea or is it that no one 
understands what I'm talking about?
Sep 06
next sibling parent XavierAP <n3minis-git yahoo.es> writes:
On Wednesday, 6 September 2017 at 23:20:41 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
wrote:
 So, no body thinks this is a useful idea or is it that no one 
 understands what I'm talking about?
I think it may be a good use, although I haven't invested so much time looking into your particular application. It looks like a normal, sane use of templates. This is what they are primarily intended for. And yes, combining them with mixins provide some great possibilities that are not available in many other languages. Have you seen how D recommends avoiding duplicate code when overloading operators, also by means of mixins: https://dlang.org/spec/operatoroverloading.html#binary I thought you may come from C since you mention void pointers as an alternative. But that is not considered the normal way in D, your new way is far better, and more "normal". It looks you may be mistaking what happens at "run-time", or it may be a way of speaking. In D, templates called with different types generate different code already at compile-time -- even if in the source code you write, it all looks and works so polymorphically. This is a similar approach as in C++ and it's why D generics are called "templates"; as opposed for example to C#, where generics are not compiled into static types and keep existing at run-time. Andrei discusses both approaches in his book, and why the first one was chosen for D.
Sep 07
prev sibling parent reply Biotronic <simen.kjaras gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 6 September 2017 at 23:20:41 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
wrote:
 So, no body thinks this is a useful idea or is it that no one 
 understands what I'm talking about?
Frankly, you'd written a lot of fairly dense code, so understanding exactly what it was doing took a while. So I sat down and rewrote it in what I'd consider more idiomatic D, partly to better understand what it was doing, partly to facilitate discussion of your ideas. The usage section of your code boils down to this: alias EnumA = TypeMap!(float, int); alias EnumB = TypeMap!(double, byte); auto foo(T1, T2)(T1 a, T2 b) { import std.conv; return T1.stringof~": "~to!string(a)~" - "~T2.stringof~": "~to!string(b); } unittest { int a = 4; double b = 1.23; EnumA enumAVal = EnumA.get!float; EnumB enumBVal = EnumB.get!byte; auto res = enumMapper!(foo, enumAVal, enumBVal)(a, b); assert(res == "float: 4 - byte: 1"); } With this implementation behind the scenes: struct TypeMap(T...) { import std.meta : staticIndexOf; private int value; alias value this; alias Types = T; static TypeMap get(T2)() if (staticIndexOf!(T2, T) > -1) { return TypeMap(staticIndexOf!(T2, T)); } } template enumMapper(alias fn, Maps...) { auto enumMapper(Args...)(Args args) { return enumMapperImpl!(OpaqueAliasSeq!(), Args)(args); } auto enumMapperImpl(alias ArgTypes, Args...)(Args args) { alias Assigned = ArgTypes.Aliases; alias Remaining = Maps[Assigned.length..$]; static if (Remaining.length == 0) { import std.traits : Parameters; alias fun = fn!Assigned; alias params = Parameters!fun; return fun(castTuple!params(args).expand); } else { alias typemap = Remaining[0]; switch (typemap) { foreach (T; typemap.Types) { case typemap.get!T: alias Types = OpaqueAliasSeq!(Assigned, T); return enumMapperImpl!Types(args); } default: assert(false); } } } } template castTuple(T...) { import std.typecons : tuple; auto castTuple(Args...)(Args args) if (Args.length == T.length) { static if (T.length == 0) { return tuple(); } else { auto result = .castTuple!(T[1..$])(args[1..$]); return tuple(cast(T[0])args[0], result.expand); } } } template OpaqueAliasSeq(T...) { alias Aliases = T; }
Sep 07
parent reply EntangledQuanta <EQ universe.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 14:28:14 UTC, Biotronic wrote:
 On Wednesday, 6 September 2017 at 23:20:41 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
 wrote:
 So, no body thinks this is a useful idea or is it that no one 
 understands what I'm talking about?
Frankly, you'd written a lot of fairly dense code, so understanding exactly what it was doing took a while. So I sat down and rewrote it in what I'd consider more idiomatic D, partly to better understand what it was doing, partly to facilitate discussion of your ideas. The usage section of your code boils down to this:
Sorry, I think you missed the point completely... or I didn't explain things very well. I see no where in your code where you have a variant like type. What I am talking about is quite simple: One chooses the correct template to use, not at compile time based on the type(like normal), but at runtime based on a runtime variable that specifies the type. This is has variants are normally used except one must manually call the correct function or code block based on the variable value. Here is a demonstration of the problem: import std.stdio, std.variant, std.conv; void foo(T)(T t) { writeln("\tfoo: Type = ", T.stringof, ", Value = ", t); } void bar(Variant val) { writeln("Variant's Type = ", to!string(val.type)); // foo called with val as a variant foo(val); writeln("Dynamic type conversion:"); switch(to!string(val.type)) { case "int": foo(val.get!int); break; // foo called with val's value as int case "float": foo(val.get!float); break; // foo called with val's value as float case "immutable(char)[]": foo(val.get!string); break; // foo called with val's value as string case "short": foo(val.get!short); break; // foo called with val's value as short default: writeln("Unknown Conversion!"); } } void main() { Variant val; writeln("\nVarant with int value:"); val = 3; bar(val); writeln("\n\nVarant with float value:"); val = 3.243f; bar(val); writeln("\n\nVarant with string value:"); val = "XXX"; bar(val); writeln("\n\nVarant with short value:"); val = cast(short)2; bar(val); getchar(); } Output: Varant with int value: Variant's Type = int foo: Type = VariantN!20u, Value = 3 Dynamic type conversion: foo: Type = int, Value = 3 Varant with float value: Variant's Type = float foo: Type = VariantN!20u, Value = 3.243 Dynamic type conversion: foo: Type = float, Value = 3.243 Varant with string value: Variant's Type = immutable(char)[] foo: Type = VariantN!20u, Value = XXX Dynamic type conversion: foo: Type = string, Value = XXX Varant with short value: Variant's Type = short foo: Type = VariantN!20u, Value = 2 Dynamic type conversion: foo: Type = short, Value = 2 The concept to gleam from this is that the switch calls foo with the correct type AT compile time. The switch creates the mapping from the runtime type that the variant can have to the compile time foo. So the first call to foo gives: `foo: Type = VariantN!20u, Value = 2`. The writeln call receives the val as a variant! It knows how to print a variant in this case, lucky for us, but we have called foo!(VariantN!20u)(val)! But the switch actually sets it up so it calls foo!(int)(val.get!int). This is a different foo! The switch statement can be seen as a dynamic dispatch that calls the appropriate compile time template BUT it actually depends on the runtime type of the variant! This magic links up a Variant, who's type is dynamic, with compile time templates. But you must realize the nature of the problem. Most code that uses a variant wouldn't use a single template to handle all the different cases: switch(to!string(val.type)) { case "int": fooInt(val.get!int); break; case "float": fooFloat(val.get!float); break; case "immutable(char)[]": fooString(val.get!string); break; case "short": fooShort(val.get!short); break; default: writeln("Unknown Conversion!"); } These functions might actually just be code blocks to handle the different cases. Now, if you understand that, the paradigm I am talking about is to have D basically generate all the switching code for us instead of us ever having to deal with the variant internals. We have something like void bar(var t) { writeln("\tbar: Type = ", t.type, ", Value = ", t); } AND it would effectively print the same results. var is akin to variant but the compiler understands this and generates N different bar's internally and a switch statement to dynamically call the desired one at runtime, yet, we can simply call bar with any value we want. e.g., void main() { bar(3); // calls bar as if bar was `void bar(int)` bar(3.4f); // calls bar as if bar was `void bar(float)` bar("sad"); // calls bar as if bar was `void bar(string)` } and the writeln in bar never sees a variant type(just like it doesn't in the first case with the switches). As you can see, the code is much much less verbose. No switch statements are written by hand. bar is sort of like a template because it can accept different types. The code I wrote simulates the above by using a mixin template to generate the switches and uses a template to call the right bar: enum Types { Int, Float, String, Short } void bar(T)(T t) { writeln("\tbar: Type = ", t.type, ", Value = ", t); } void main() { mixin(EnumMapper!("bar", Types, 3)); mixin(EnumMapper!("bar", Types, 3.4f)); mixin(EnumMapper!("bar", Types, "sad")); } Note that each mixin is a switch statement. It's still much shorter than the original solution, specially if one uses dynamic types a lot... but still quite verbose. Imagine if the compiler did this for us!! Not only would it be very elegant it is also fast because it's just a switch statement. It basically turns dynamic types in to compile time types(at the cost of the switches, which is just a cmp and jmp instruction). dynamic in C# is pretty slow because it has to do a bit more than this, since it doesn't actually have a compile time template like D has. Is that more clear? What it would allow us to do, if we wanted, is to never use auto or any explicit types and we would have something like a D version of a dynamically typed language(again, at the cost of the switches, but it's all hidden from us). Of course, there are two problems with this: 1. The types have to be known at compile time(so it can generate the switch, although 'default' could be used to handle unknown cases using standard techniques). 2. At some point we generally will have to do some type of manual switch on the types. Writeln, for example, does this internally for us, which is why I used it. If the types are confluent, then we can get away with out doing this such as the confluent primitive types. e.g., if we were just adding two numbers, we could have auto bar(var t1, var t2) { return t1 + t2; } and it would work as long as t1 and t2 were confluent. What's more is that if we later decide we want to use only a specific type, we don't have to change anything but could simply change var to one of the types such as int, and the compiler and optimize out the switch. What's more, is that we can return var's and this allows us to do do things like var foo(var x) { if (x == 3) return x; return "error!"; } or whatever. It's clear, concise, fast, and bridges the gap between compile time and runtime variables. It obviously can't solve the impossible but does provide a nice solution for certain problems and for simple uses. I think the main drawback is that one can't really use this to the extreme because the code will explode both in size and performance cost. All those switches will add up in both memory size and cycles... I'm not sure if that would effect normal usage though.
Sep 07
parent Biotronic <simen.kjaras gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 16:55:02 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
wrote:
 Sorry, I think you missed the point completely... or I didn't 
 explain things very well.
I don't think I did - your new explanation didn't change my understanding at least. This indicates I'm the one who's bad at explaining. Ah well. The point of my post was mostly to rewrite the code you'd posted in a form that I (and, I hope, others) found easier to understand.
 I see no where in your code where you have a variant like type.
True. I've now rewritten it to use std.variant.Algebraic with these semantics: auto foo(T1, T2)(T1 a, T2 b, int n) { import std.conv; return T1.stringof~": "~to!string(a)~" - "~T2.stringof~": "~to!string(b); } unittest { import std.variant; Algebraic!(float, int) a = 4f; Algebraic!(double, byte) b = 1.23; auto res = varCall!foo(a, b, 3); assert(res == "float: 4 - double: 1.23"); } template varCall(alias fn) { import std.variant; auto varCall(int n = 0, Args...)(Args args) { static if (n == Args.length) { return fn(args); } else { auto arg = args[n]; static if (is(typeof(arg) == VariantN!U, U...)) { foreach (T; arg.AllowedTypes) { if (arg.type == typeid(T)) return varCall!(n+1)(args[0..n], arg.get!T, args[n+1..$]); } assert(false); } else { return varCall!(n+1)(args); } } } } Sadly, by using std.variant, I've given up on the elegant switch/case in exchange for a linear search by typeid. This can be fixed, but requires changes in std.variant. Of course, it would be possible to hide all this behind compiler magic. Is that desirable? I frankly do not think so. We should be wary of adding too much magic to the compiler - it complicates the language and its implementation. This is little more than an optimization, and while a compiler solution would be less intrusive and perhaps more elegant, I do not feel it provides enough added value to warrant its inclusion. Next, I'm curious about this code:
 void bar(var t)
 {
     writeln("\tbar: Type = ", t.type, ", Value = ", t);
 }
 
 void main()
 {
    bar(3); // calls bar as if bar was `void bar(int)`
    bar(3.4f); // calls bar as if bar was `void bar(float)`
    bar("sad"); // calls bar as if bar was `void bar(string)`
 }
What does 'var' add here, that regular templates do not? (serious question, I'm not trying to shoot down your idea, only to better understand it) One possible problem with var here (if I understand it correctly) would be separate compilation - a generated switch would need to know about types in other source files that may not be available at the time it is compiled. Next:
 var foo(var x)
 {
    if (x == 3)
        return x;
    return "error!";
 }
This looks like a sort of reverse alias this, which I've argued for on many occasions. Currently, it is impossible to implement a type var as in that function - the conversion from string to var would fail. A means of implementing this has been discussed since at least 2007, and I wrote a DIP[1] about it way back in 2013. It would make working with variants and many other types much more pleasant. [1]: https://wiki.dlang.org/DIP52
Sep 07
prev sibling parent reply Jesse Phillips <Jesse.K.Phillips+D gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 4 September 2017 at 03:26:23 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
wrote:
 To get a feel for what this new way of dealing with dynamic 
 types might look like:

 void foo(var y) { writeln(y); }

 var x = "3"; // or possibly var!(string, int) for the explicit 
 types used
 foo(x);
 x = 3;
 foo(x);

 (just pseudo code, don't take the syntax literally, that is not 
 what is important)

 While this example is trivial, the thing to note is that there 
 is one foo declared, but two created at runtime. One for string 
 and one for and int. It is like a variant, yet we don't have to 
 do any testing. It is very similar to `dynamic` in C#, but 
 better since actually can "know" the type at compile time, so 
 to speak. It's not that we actually know, but that we write 
 code as if we knew.. it's treated as if it's statically typed.
It is an interesting thought but I'm not sure of its utility. First let me describe how I had to go about thinking of what this means. Today I think it would be possible for a given function 'call()' to write this: alias var = Algebraic!(double, string); void foo(var y) { mixin(call!writeln(y)); } Again the implementation of call() is yet to exist but likely uses many of the techniques you describe and use. Where I'm questioning the utility, and I haven't used C#'s dynamic much, is with the frequency I'm manipulating arbitrary data the same, that is to say: auto m = var(4); mixin(call!find(m, "hello")); This would have to throw a runtime exception, that is to say, in order to use the type value I need to know its type. A couple of additional thoughts: The call() function could do something similar to pattern matching but args could be confusing: mixin(call!(find, round)(m, "hello")); But I feel that would just get confusing. The call() function could still be useful even when needing to check the type to know what operations to do. if(m.type == string) mixin(call!find(m, "hello")); instead of: if(m.type == string) m.get!string.find("hello");
Sep 07
parent reply EntangledQuanta <EQ universe.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 15:36:47 UTC, Jesse Phillips 
wrote:
 On Monday, 4 September 2017 at 03:26:23 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
 wrote:
 To get a feel for what this new way of dealing with dynamic 
 types might look like:

 void foo(var y) { writeln(y); }

 var x = "3"; // or possibly var!(string, int) for the explicit 
 types used
 foo(x);
 x = 3;
 foo(x);

 (just pseudo code, don't take the syntax literally, that is 
 not what is important)

 While this example is trivial, the thing to note is that there 
 is one foo declared, but two created at runtime. One for 
 string and one for and int. It is like a variant, yet we don't 
 have to do any testing. It is very similar to `dynamic` in C#, 
 but better since actually can "know" the type at compile time, 
 so to speak. It's not that we actually know, but that we write 
 code as if we knew.. it's treated as if it's statically typed.
It is an interesting thought but I'm not sure of its utility. First let me describe how I had to go about thinking of what this means. Today I think it would be possible for a given function 'call()' to write this: alias var = Algebraic!(double, string); void foo(var y) { mixin(call!writeln(y)); } Again the implementation of call() is yet to exist but likely uses many of the techniques you describe and use. Where I'm questioning the utility, and I haven't used C#'s dynamic much, is with the frequency I'm manipulating arbitrary data the same, that is to say: auto m = var(4); mixin(call!find(m, "hello")); This would have to throw a runtime exception, that is to say, in order to use the type value I need to know its type.
All types have a type ;) You specified in the above case that m is an int by setting it to 4(I assume that is what var(4) means). But the downside, at least on some level, all the usable types must be know or the switch cannot be generated(there is the default case which might be able to solve the unknown type problem in some way).
 A couple of additional thoughts:

 The call() function could do something similar to pattern 
 matching but args could be confusing:

     mixin(call!(find, round)(m, "hello"));

 But I feel that would just get confusing. The call() function 
 could still be useful even when needing to check the type to 
 know what operations to do.

     if(m.type == string)
         mixin(call!find(m, "hello"));

 instead of:
     if(m.type == string)
         m.get!string.find("hello");
The whole point is to avoid those checks as much as possible. With the typical library solution using variant, the checks are 100% necessary. With the solution I'm proposing, the compiler generates the checks behind the scenes and calls the template that corresponds to the check. This is the main difference. We can use a single template that the switch directs all checks to. But since the template is compile time, we only need one, and we can treat it like any other compile time template(that is the main key here, we are leveraging D's template's to deal with the runtime complexity). See my reply to Biotronic with the examples I gave as they should be more clear. The usefulness of such things are as useful as they are. Hard to tell without the actual ability to use them. The code I created in the other thread was useful to me as it allowed me to handle a variant type that was beyond my control(given to me by an external library) in a nice and simple way using a template. Since all the types were confluent(integral values), I could use a single template without any type dispatching... so it worked out well. e.g., Take com's variant. If you are doing com programming, you'll have to deal with it. The only way is a large switch statement. You can't get around that. Even with this method it will still require approximately the same checking because most of the types are not confluent. So, in these cases all the method does is push the "switch" in to the template. BUT it still turns it in to a compile time test(since the runtime test was done in the switch). Instead of one large switch one can do it in templates(and specialize where necessary) which, IMO, looks nicer with the added benefit of more control and more inline with how D works. Also, most of the work is simply at the "end" point. If, say, all of phobos was rewritten to us these variants instead of runtime types, then a normal program would have to deal very little with any type checking. The downside would be an explosion in size and decrease in performance(possibly mitigated to some degree but still large). So, it's not a panacea, but nothing is. I see it as more of a bridge between runtime and compile time that helps in certain cases quite well. e.g., Having to write a switch statement for all possible types a variable could have. With the mxin, or a comiler solution, this is reduced to virtually nothing in many cases and ends up just looking like normal D template code. Remember, a template is actually N different normal functions so they are quite useful for collapsing code down by large factors, which is why they are so useful.
Sep 07
parent reply apz28 <home home.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 17:13:43 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
wrote:
 On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 15:36:47 UTC, Jesse Phillips 
 wrote:
 [...]
All types have a type ;) You specified in the above case that m is an int by setting it to 4(I assume that is what var(4) means). But the downside, at least on some level, all the usable types must be know or the switch cannot be generated(there is the default case which might be able to solve the unknown type problem in some way). [...]
Nice for simple types but fail for struct, array & object Current variant implementation is lack of type-id to check for above ones. For this lacking, is there a runtime (not compile time - trait) to check if a type is a struct or array or object? Cheer
Sep 07
parent EntangledQuanta <EQ universe.com> writes:
On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 19:33:01 UTC, apz28 wrote:
 On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 17:13:43 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
 wrote:
 On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 15:36:47 UTC, Jesse Phillips 
 wrote:
 [...]
All types have a type ;) You specified in the above case that m is an int by setting it to 4(I assume that is what var(4) means). But the downside, at least on some level, all the usable types must be know or the switch cannot be generated(there is the default case which might be able to solve the unknown type problem in some way). [...]
Nice for simple types but fail for struct, array & object Current variant implementation is lack of type-id to check for above ones. For this lacking, is there a runtime (not compile time - trait) to check if a type is a struct or array or object? Cheer
On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 19:33:01 UTC, apz28 wrote:
 On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 17:13:43 UTC, EntangledQuanta 
 wrote:
 On Thursday, 7 September 2017 at 15:36:47 UTC, Jesse Phillips 
 wrote:
 [...]
All types have a type ;) You specified in the above case that m is an int by setting it to 4(I assume that is what var(4) means). But the downside, at least on some level, all the usable types must be know or the switch cannot be generated(there is the default case which might be able to solve the unknown type problem in some way). [...]
Nice for simple types but fail for struct, array & object Current variant implementation is lack of type-id to check for above ones. For this lacking, is there a runtime (not compile time - trait) to check if a type is a struct or array or object? Cheer
No, it is not a big deal. One simply has to have a mapping, it doesn't matter what kind of type, only that it exists at compile time. It can be extended to be used with any specific type. One will need to be able to include some type information in the types that do not have them though, but that only costs a little memory. The point is not the exact method I used, which is just fodder, but that if the compiler implemented such a feature, it would be very clean. I left, obviously, a lot of details out that the compiler would have to due. In the protoypes, you see that I included an enum... the enum is what does the work... it contains type information. enum types { Class, Float, Int, MySpecificClass, } the switch then can be used and as long as the actual values 'typeid' matches, it will link up with the template. You can't use types directly, that would be pointless, they have to be wrapped in a variant like type which contains the type value. e.g., struct Variant(T) { types type; T val; alias this = val; } which is a lightweight wrapper around anything. This is basically like std.variant.Variant except the type indicator comes from an enum. Again, this simplifies the discussion but it is not a problem for classes, structs, enums, or any other type, as long as they exist at compile time. I only used std.variant.Variant to simplify things, but the compiler would have to construct the typeid list internally. (I did it in my add explicitly for the types I was going to use) As far as runtime checking, no, because bits are bits. You can cast any pointer to any type you want and there is no way to know if it is suppose to be valid or not. This is why you have to include the type info somewhere for the object. classes have classinfo but there would be no way to validate it 100%.
Sep 07