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digitalmars.D.learn - Multi-file byte comparison tool. What would you have done differently?

reply Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> writes:
I have a need for detecting incorrect byte sequences in multiple files 
(>2) at a time (as a part of our porting effort to new platforms.) 
Ideally the files should be identical for all but a handful of byte 
sequences (in a header section) that I can just skip over. I thought 
this would be a fun exercise for my D muscles. I found success creating 
a dynamic array of structs to keep information about each file passed in 
via command-line parameters. I'll append the code at the end (and I'm 
sure it'll get mangled in the process...)

(I'm not one for coming up with creative names, so it's SOMETHING) Then 
I loop around a read for each file, then manually run a for loop from 0 
to BLOCK_SIZE, copy the size_t value into a new dynamic array (one for 
each of the files opened), and run a function to ensure all values in 
the size_t array are the same. If not, I compare each ubyte value (via 
the byte_union) to determine which bytes are not correct by adding each 
byte to a separate array, and comparing each value in that array, 
printing the address and values of each bad byte as I encounter them.

This appears to work great. Some justifications:
I used size_t because I'm under the impression it's a platform specific 
size that best fits into a single register, thus making comparisons 
faster than byte-by-byte.
I used a union to extract the bytes from the size_t
I wanted to create a SOMETHING for each file at run-time, instead of 
only allowing a certain number of SOMETHINGS (either hard coded, or a 
limit).
Originally I wrote my own comparison function, but in my search for 
something more functional, I tried out std.algorithm's count. Can't say 
I can tell if it's better or worse.

Features I'll probably add if I have to keep using the tool:
1) Better support for starting points and bytes to read.
2) Threshold for errors encountered, perferrably managed by a 
command-line argument.
3) Coalescing error messages in sequential byte sequences.

When I run the program, it's certainly I/O bound at 30Mb/s to an 
external USB drive :).

So the question is, how would you make it more D-ish? (Do we have a term 
analogous to "pythonic" for D? :))


Code:

import std.stdio;
import std.file;
import std.conv;
import std.getopt;
import std.algorithm;

enum BLOCK_SIZE = 1024;
union byte_union
{
     size_t val;
     ubyte[val.sizeof] bytes;
}
struct SOMETHING
{
     string file_name;
     size_t size_bytes;
     File fd;
     byte_union[BLOCK_SIZE] bytes;
}

void main(string[] args)
{
     size_t bytes_read;
     size_t bytes_max;
     size_t size_smallest;
     size_t[] comp_arr;
     SOMETHING[] somethings;
     getopt(args,
         "seek", &bytes_read,
         "bytes", &bytes_max
     );
     if(bytes_max == 0)
         bytes_max = size_t.max; // Limit on the smallest file size
     else
         bytes_max += bytes_read;
     //bytes_read = bytes_read - (bytes_read % (BLOCK_SIZE * 
SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof));
     size_smallest = bytes_max;
     somethings.length = args.length - 1;
     comp_arr.length = args.length - 1;
     for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
     {
         somethings[i].file_name = args[i + 1];
         somethings[i].size_bytes = getSize(somethings[i].file_name);
         stderr.writef("Opening file: %s(%d)\n", 
somethings[i].file_name, somethings[i].size_bytes);
         somethings[i].fd = File(somethings[i].file_name, "r");
         somethings[i].fd.seek(bytes_read);
         if(somethings[i].fd.tell() != bytes_read)
         {
             stderr.writef("Failed to seek to position %d in %s\n", 
bytes_read, args[i + 1]);
         }
         // Pick the smallest file, or the limit
         size_smallest = min(size_smallest, somethings[i].size_bytes);
     }
     // Check file sizes
     for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
         comp_arr[i] = somethings[i].size_bytes;
     writef("count: %s\n", count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]));
     if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
     {
         stderr.writef("Files are not the same size!");
         foreach(s; somethings)
             stderr.writef("[%s:%d]", s.file_name, s.size_bytes);
         stderr.writef("\n");
     }

     // While bytes_read < size of smallest file
     size_t block_counter;
     while(bytes_read < size_smallest)
     {
         // Read bytes
         //stderr.writef("tell: ");
         for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
         {
             //stderr.writef("Reading file %s\n", file_names[i]);
             //stderr.writef("%d ", somethings[i].fd.tell());
             //if(somethings[0].fd.tell() + BLOCK_SIZE * 
SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof > somethings[0].size_bytes)
             //{
             //    stderr.writef("Warning, reading last block : 
[%d:%d:%d]\n", somethings[0].fd.tell(), somethings[0].size_bytes, 
somethings[0].fd.tell() + BLOCK_SIZE * SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof);
             //    for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings[i].bytes.length; j++)
             //    {
             //        somethings[i].bytes[i].val = 0;
             //    }
             //}
             somethings[i].fd.rawRead(somethings[i].bytes);
         }
         // Compare all size_t values
         for(size_t i = 0; i < BLOCK_SIZE; i++)
         {
             // If one is different
             for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings.length; j++)
                 comp_arr[j] = somethings[j].bytes[i].val;
             if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
             {
                 // Compare bytes inside to determine which byte(s) are 
different
                 for(size_t k = 0; k < byte_union.sizeof; k++)
                 {
                     for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings.length; j++)
                         comp_arr[j] = 
to!(size_t)(somethings[j].bytes[i].bytes[k]);
                     if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
                     {
                         stderr.writef("Byte at 0x%08x (%u) does not 
match %s\n",
                             bytes_read + i * byte_union.sizeof + k,
                             bytes_read + i * byte_union.sizeof + k, 
comp_arr);
                     }
                 }
             }
         }
         bytes_read += BLOCK_SIZE * SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof;
         block_counter++;
         if( (block_counter % (1024 * 25)) == 0)
         {
             stderr.writef("Completed %5.1fGB\n", 
to!(double)(bytes_read) / 1024 / 1024 / 1024);
         }
     }

     for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
     {
         somethings[i].fd.close();
     }
}
Aug 04 2011
next sibling parent reply Timon Gehr <timon.gehr gmx.ch> writes:
Kai Meyer wrote:
 So the question is, how would you make it more D-ish? (Do we have a term
 analogous to "pythonic" for D? :))

An easy first step to improve the D-Factor would be to replace all these for loops with foreach loops and ref foreach loops. -Timon
Aug 04 2011
parent Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> writes:
On 08/04/2011 05:03 PM, Timon Gehr wrote:
 Kai Meyer wrote:
 So the question is, how would you make it more D-ish? (Do we have a term
 analogous to "pythonic" for D? :))

An easy first step to improve the D-Factor would be to replace all these for loops with foreach loops and ref foreach loops. -Timon

I like D-Factor :) I haven't done foreach(ref s; somethings) before. Interesting, thanks :)
Aug 05 2011
prev sibling parent reply Pelle <pelle.mansson gmail.com> writes:
On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 00:25:38 +0200, Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> wrote:

 I have a need for detecting incorrect byte sequences in multiple files  
 (>2) at a time (as a part of our porting effort to new platforms.)  
 Ideally the files should be identical for all but a handful of byte  
 sequences (in a header section) that I can just skip over. I thought  
 this would be a fun exercise for my D muscles. I found success creating  
 a dynamic array of structs to keep information about each file passed in  
 via command-line parameters. I'll append the code at the end (and I'm  
 sure it'll get mangled in the process...)

 (I'm not one for coming up with creative names, so it's SOMETHING) Then  
 I loop around a read for each file, then manually run a for loop from 0  
 to BLOCK_SIZE, copy the size_t value into a new dynamic array (one for  
 each of the files opened), and run a function to ensure all values in  
 the size_t array are the same. If not, I compare each ubyte value (via  
 the byte_union) to determine which bytes are not correct by adding each  
 byte to a separate array, and comparing each value in that array,  
 printing the address and values of each bad byte as I encounter them.

 This appears to work great. Some justifications:
 I used size_t because I'm under the impression it's a platform specific  
 size that best fits into a single register, thus making comparisons  
 faster than byte-by-byte.
 I used a union to extract the bytes from the size_t
 I wanted to create a SOMETHING for each file at run-time, instead of  
 only allowing a certain number of SOMETHINGS (either hard coded, or a  
 limit).
 Originally I wrote my own comparison function, but in my search for  
 something more functional, I tried out std.algorithm's count. Can't say  
 I can tell if it's better or worse.

 Features I'll probably add if I have to keep using the tool:
 1) Better support for starting points and bytes to read.
 2) Threshold for errors encountered, perferrably managed by a  
 command-line argument.
 3) Coalescing error messages in sequential byte sequences.

 When I run the program, it's certainly I/O bound at 30Mb/s to an  
 external USB drive :).

 So the question is, how would you make it more D-ish? (Do we have a term  
 analogous to "pythonic" for D? :))


 Code:

 import std.stdio;
 import std.file;
 import std.conv;
 import std.getopt;
 import std.algorithm;

 enum BLOCK_SIZE = 1024;
 union byte_union
 {
      size_t val;
      ubyte[val.sizeof] bytes;
 }
 struct SOMETHING
 {
      string file_name;
      size_t size_bytes;
      File fd;
      byte_union[BLOCK_SIZE] bytes;
 }

I would use TypeNames and nonTypeNames, so, blockSize, ByteUnion, Something, sizeBytes, etc.
 void main(string[] args)
 {
      size_t bytes_read;
      size_t bytes_max;
      size_t size_smallest;
      size_t[] comp_arr;
      SOMETHING[] somethings;

Don't declare variables until you need them, just leave bytes_read and bytes_max here.
      getopt(args,
          "seek", &bytes_read,
          "bytes", &bytes_max
      );
      if(bytes_max == 0)
          bytes_max = size_t.max; // Limit on the smallest file size
      else
          bytes_max += bytes_read;
      //bytes_read = bytes_read - (bytes_read % (BLOCK_SIZE *  
 SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof));
      size_smallest = bytes_max;
      somethings.length = args.length - 1;
      comp_arr.length = args.length - 1;
      for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
      {
          somethings[i].file_name = args[i + 1];
          somethings[i].size_bytes = getSize(somethings[i].file_name);
          stderr.writef("Opening file: %s(%d)\n",  
 somethings[i].file_name, somethings[i].size_bytes);
          somethings[i].fd = File(somethings[i].file_name, "r");
          somethings[i].fd.seek(bytes_read);
          if(somethings[i].fd.tell() != bytes_read)
          {
              stderr.writef("Failed to seek to position %d in %s\n",  
 bytes_read, args[i + 1]);
          }
          // Pick the smallest file, or the limit
          size_smallest = min(size_smallest, somethings[i].size_bytes);
      }

Use foreach (ref something; somethings) and something instead of somethings[i].
      // Check file sizes
      for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
          comp_arr[i] = somethings[i].size_bytes;
      writef("count: %s\n", count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]));
      if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
      {
          stderr.writef("Files are not the same size!");
          foreach(s; somethings)
              stderr.writef("[%s:%d]", s.file_name, s.size_bytes);
          stderr.writef("\n");
      }

You can use writefln() istead of writef("\n") everywhere.
      // While bytes_read < size of smallest file
      size_t block_counter;
      while(bytes_read < size_smallest)
      {
          // Read bytes
          //stderr.writef("tell: ");
          for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
          {
              //stderr.writef("Reading file %s\n", file_names[i]);
              //stderr.writef("%d ", somethings[i].fd.tell());
              //if(somethings[0].fd.tell() + BLOCK_SIZE *  
 SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof > somethings[0].size_bytes)
              //{
              //    stderr.writef("Warning, reading last block :  
 [%d:%d:%d]\n", somethings[0].fd.tell(), somethings[0].size_bytes,  
 somethings[0].fd.tell() + BLOCK_SIZE * SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof);
              //    for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings[i].bytes.length; j++)
              //    {
              //        somethings[i].bytes[i].val = 0;
              //    }
              //}
              somethings[i].fd.rawRead(somethings[i].bytes);
          }
          // Compare all size_t values
          for(size_t i = 0; i < BLOCK_SIZE; i++)
          {

Here you can use foreach (i; 0 .. blockSize)
              // If one is different
              for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings.length; j++)
                  comp_arr[j] = somethings[j].bytes[i].val;
              if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
              {
                  // Compare bytes inside to determine which byte(s) are  
 different
                  for(size_t k = 0; k < byte_union.sizeof; k++)
                  {
                      for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings.length; j++)
                          comp_arr[j] =  
 to!(size_t)(somethings[j].bytes[i].bytes[k]);
                      if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
                      {
                          stderr.writef("Byte at 0x%08x (%u) does not  
 match %s\n",
                              bytes_read + i * byte_union.sizeof + k,
                              bytes_read + i * byte_union.sizeof + k,  
 comp_arr);
                      }
                  }
              }
          }
          bytes_read += BLOCK_SIZE * SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof;
          block_counter++;
          if( (block_counter % (1024 * 25)) == 0)
          {
              stderr.writef("Completed %5.1fGB\n",  
 to!(double)(bytes_read) / 1024 / 1024 / 1024);
          }
      }

      for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
      {
          somethings[i].fd.close();
      }
 }

You don't generally need to close them, they should be closed by the destructors of the File (I think, at least). I don't understand why you use ByteUnion instead of just a plain array of bytes. I also don't understand why you write so much to stderr instead of stdout.
Aug 05 2011
next sibling parent reply Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> writes:
On 08/05/2011 03:02 AM, Pelle wrote:
 On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 00:25:38 +0200, Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> wrote:

 I have a need for detecting incorrect byte sequences in multiple files
 (>2) at a time (as a part of our porting effort to new platforms.)
 Ideally the files should be identical for all but a handful of byte
 sequences (in a header section) that I can just skip over. I thought
 this would be a fun exercise for my D muscles. I found success
 creating a dynamic array of structs to keep information about each
 file passed in via command-line parameters. I'll append the code at
 the end (and I'm sure it'll get mangled in the process...)

 (I'm not one for coming up with creative names, so it's SOMETHING)
 Then I loop around a read for each file, then manually run a for loop
 from 0 to BLOCK_SIZE, copy the size_t value into a new dynamic array
 (one for each of the files opened), and run a function to ensure all
 values in the size_t array are the same. If not, I compare each ubyte
 value (via the byte_union) to determine which bytes are not correct by
 adding each byte to a separate array, and comparing each value in that
 array, printing the address and values of each bad byte as I encounter
 them.

 This appears to work great. Some justifications:
 I used size_t because I'm under the impression it's a platform
 specific size that best fits into a single register, thus making
 comparisons faster than byte-by-byte.
 I used a union to extract the bytes from the size_t
 I wanted to create a SOMETHING for each file at run-time, instead of
 only allowing a certain number of SOMETHINGS (either hard coded, or a
 limit).
 Originally I wrote my own comparison function, but in my search for
 something more functional, I tried out std.algorithm's count. Can't
 say I can tell if it's better or worse.

 Features I'll probably add if I have to keep using the tool:
 1) Better support for starting points and bytes to read.
 2) Threshold for errors encountered, perferrably managed by a
 command-line argument.
 3) Coalescing error messages in sequential byte sequences.

 When I run the program, it's certainly I/O bound at 30Mb/s to an
 external USB drive :).

 So the question is, how would you make it more D-ish? (Do we have a
 term analogous to "pythonic" for D? :))


 Code:

 import std.stdio;
 import std.file;
 import std.conv;
 import std.getopt;
 import std.algorithm;

 enum BLOCK_SIZE = 1024;
 union byte_union
 {
 size_t val;
 ubyte[val.sizeof] bytes;
 }
 struct SOMETHING
 {
 string file_name;
 size_t size_bytes;
 File fd;
 byte_union[BLOCK_SIZE] bytes;
 }

I would use TypeNames and nonTypeNames, so, blockSize, ByteUnion, Something, sizeBytes, etc.

material for me? Searching http://www.d-programming-language.org/ didn't give me anything that sounds like what you're talking about.
 void main(string[] args)
 {
 size_t bytes_read;
 size_t bytes_max;
 size_t size_smallest;
 size_t[] comp_arr;
 SOMETHING[] somethings;

Don't declare variables until you need them, just leave bytes_read and bytes_max here.

D-Factor suggestion?
 getopt(args,
 "seek", &bytes_read,
 "bytes", &bytes_max
 );
 if(bytes_max == 0)
 bytes_max = size_t.max; // Limit on the smallest file size
 else
 bytes_max += bytes_read;
 //bytes_read = bytes_read - (bytes_read % (BLOCK_SIZE *
 SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof));
 size_smallest = bytes_max;
 somethings.length = args.length - 1;
 comp_arr.length = args.length - 1;
 for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
 {
 somethings[i].file_name = args[i + 1];
 somethings[i].size_bytes = getSize(somethings[i].file_name);
 stderr.writef("Opening file: %s(%d)\n", somethings[i].file_name,
 somethings[i].size_bytes);
 somethings[i].fd = File(somethings[i].file_name, "r");
 somethings[i].fd.seek(bytes_read);
 if(somethings[i].fd.tell() != bytes_read)
 {
 stderr.writef("Failed to seek to position %d in %s\n", bytes_read,
 args[i + 1]);
 }
 // Pick the smallest file, or the limit
 size_smallest = min(size_smallest, somethings[i].size_bytes);
 }

Use foreach (ref something; somethings) and something instead of somethings[i].

 // Check file sizes
 for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
 comp_arr[i] = somethings[i].size_bytes;
 writef("count: %s\n", count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]));
 if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
 {
 stderr.writef("Files are not the same size!");
 foreach(s; somethings)
 stderr.writef("[%s:%d]", s.file_name, s.size_bytes);
 stderr.writef("\n");
 }

You can use writefln() istead of writef("\n") everywhere.

 // While bytes_read < size of smallest file
 size_t block_counter;
 while(bytes_read < size_smallest)
 {
 // Read bytes
 //stderr.writef("tell: ");
 for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
 {
 //stderr.writef("Reading file %s\n", file_names[i]);
 //stderr.writef("%d ", somethings[i].fd.tell());
 //if(somethings[0].fd.tell() + BLOCK_SIZE *
 SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof > somethings[0].size_bytes)
 //{
 // stderr.writef("Warning, reading last block : [%d:%d:%d]\n",
 somethings[0].fd.tell(), somethings[0].size_bytes,
 somethings[0].fd.tell() + BLOCK_SIZE * SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof);
 // for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings[i].bytes.length; j++)
 // {
 // somethings[i].bytes[i].val = 0;
 // }
 //}
 somethings[i].fd.rawRead(somethings[i].bytes);
 }
 // Compare all size_t values
 for(size_t i = 0; i < BLOCK_SIZE; i++)
 {

Here you can use foreach (i; 0 .. blockSize)

 // If one is different
 for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings.length; j++)
 comp_arr[j] = somethings[j].bytes[i].val;
 if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
 {
 // Compare bytes inside to determine which byte(s) are different
 for(size_t k = 0; k < byte_union.sizeof; k++)
 {
 for(size_t j = 0; j < somethings.length; j++)
 comp_arr[j] = to!(size_t)(somethings[j].bytes[i].bytes[k]);
 if(count(comp_arr, comp_arr[0]) != comp_arr.length)
 {
 stderr.writef("Byte at 0x%08x (%u) does not match %s\n",
 bytes_read + i * byte_union.sizeof + k,
 bytes_read + i * byte_union.sizeof + k, comp_arr);
 }
 }
 }
 }
 bytes_read += BLOCK_SIZE * SOMETHING.size_bytes.sizeof;
 block_counter++;
 if( (block_counter % (1024 * 25)) == 0)
 {
 stderr.writef("Completed %5.1fGB\n", to!(double)(bytes_read) / 1024 /
 1024 / 1024);
 }
 }

 for(size_t i = 0; i < somethings.length; i++)
 {
 somethings[i].fd.close();
 }
 }

You don't generally need to close them, they should be closed by the destructors of the File (I think, at least).

I'm not. Infact, the first two things I wrote in the script was a loop for open and a loop for close :)
 I don't understand why you use ByteUnion instead of just a plain array
 of bytes.

comparing 8 bytes at a time (size_t on 64bit) and failing over to the byte-by-byte comparison only when the size_t value was different.
 I also don't understand why you write so much to stderr
 instead of stdout.

do with little hackish scripts like this is if I need to go back and add actual useful info to STDOUT in a format that is generally consumable (usually because somebody else wants to use the tool), leaving the STDERR stuff in there for my own purposes. Then I test by doing something like "./byte_check <file list> 2>/dev/null". When I'm ready to dump my terse output, I either keep them for a -v flag, or just delete the lines. They're easy to find. Thanks for your feedback :)
Aug 05 2011
next sibling parent Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> writes:
On 08/05/2011 11:13 AM, Jonathan M Davis wrote:
 On 08/05/2011 03:02 AM, Pelle wrote:
 On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 00:25:38 +0200, Kai Meyer<kai unixlords.com>  wrote:
 I have a need for detecting incorrect byte sequences in multiple files
 (>2) at a time (as a part of our porting effort to new platforms.)
 Ideally the files should be identical for all but a handful of byte
 sequences (in a header section) that I can just skip over. I thought
 this would be a fun exercise for my D muscles. I found success
 creating a dynamic array of structs to keep information about each
 file passed in via command-line parameters. I'll append the code at
 the end (and I'm sure it'll get mangled in the process...)

 (I'm not one for coming up with creative names, so it's SOMETHING)
 Then I loop around a read for each file, then manually run a for loop
 from 0 to BLOCK_SIZE, copy the size_t value into a new dynamic array
 (one for each of the files opened), and run a function to ensure all
 values in the size_t array are the same. If not, I compare each ubyte
 value (via the byte_union) to determine which bytes are not correct by
 adding each byte to a separate array, and comparing each value in that
 array, printing the address and values of each bad byte as I encounter
 them.

 This appears to work great. Some justifications:
 I used size_t because I'm under the impression it's a platform
 specific size that best fits into a single register, thus making
 comparisons faster than byte-by-byte.
 I used a union to extract the bytes from the size_t
 I wanted to create a SOMETHING for each file at run-time, instead of
 only allowing a certain number of SOMETHINGS (either hard coded, or a
 limit).
 Originally I wrote my own comparison function, but in my search for
 something more functional, I tried out std.algorithm's count. Can't
 say I can tell if it's better or worse.

 Features I'll probably add if I have to keep using the tool:
 1) Better support for starting points and bytes to read.
 2) Threshold for errors encountered, perferrably managed by a
 command-line argument.
 3) Coalescing error messages in sequential byte sequences.

 When I run the program, it's certainly I/O bound at 30Mb/s to an
 external USB drive :).

 So the question is, how would you make it more D-ish? (Do we have a
 term analogous to "pythonic" for D? :))


 Code:

 import std.stdio;
 import std.file;
 import std.conv;
 import std.getopt;
 import std.algorithm;

 enum BLOCK_SIZE = 1024;
 union byte_union
 {
 size_t val;
 ubyte[val.sizeof] bytes;
 }
 struct SOMETHING
 {
 string file_name;
 size_t size_bytes;
 File fd;
 byte_union[BLOCK_SIZE] bytes;
 }

I would use TypeNames and nonTypeNames, so, blockSize, ByteUnion, Something, sizeBytes, etc.

I haven't used TypeNames or nonTypeNames. Do have some reference material for me? Searching http://www.d-programming-language.org/ didn't give me anything that sounds like what you're talking about.

I believe that he was talking about how you named your variables and type names. Normall in D, user-defined types use pascal case (e.g. Something and ByteUnion, not SOMETHING and byte_union), and everything else uses camelcase (e.g. blockSize and fileName, not BLOCK_SIZE and file_name). It's an issue of style. You can name your variables however you'd like to, but what you're doing doesn't match what most of the people around here do, which can make it harder to read the code that you post. He was simply suggesting that you follow the more typical D naming conventions. It's completely up to you though. - Jonathan M Davis

that need to be broken if I want to increase my D-Factor!
Aug 05 2011
prev sibling parent Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> writes:
On 08/08/2011 12:33 AM, Pelle wrote:
 On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 18:43:27 +0200, Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> wrote:

 On 08/05/2011 03:02 AM, Pelle wrote:
 Don't declare variables until you need them, just leave bytes_read and
 bytes_max here.

D-Factor suggestion?

Just style and D-factor :-) Also, resulting code is shorter, and you can replace a lot of type names with auto.
 I don't understand why you use ByteUnion instead of just a plain array
 of bytes.

comparing 8 bytes at a time (size_t on 64bit) and failing over to the byte-by-byte comparison only when the size_t value was different.

Maybe, but that's something that should be benchmarked. If a byte array is just as fast, and the code is simpler, that's a better solution :)

I simply can't imagine how 8,000 byte comparisons would be even close to comparable to 1,000 size_t comparisons done one at a time, with the way I'm doing the comparison. I'm certain there are much better ways of comparing bits, but I'm not ready to make this program that complex :)
Aug 08 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent "Jonathan M Davis" <jmdavisProg gmx.com> writes:
 On 08/05/2011 03:02 AM, Pelle wrote:
 On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 00:25:38 +0200, Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> wrote:
 I have a need for detecting incorrect byte sequences in multiple files
 (>2) at a time (as a part of our porting effort to new platforms.)
 Ideally the files should be identical for all but a handful of byte
 sequences (in a header section) that I can just skip over. I thought
 this would be a fun exercise for my D muscles. I found success
 creating a dynamic array of structs to keep information about each
 file passed in via command-line parameters. I'll append the code at
 the end (and I'm sure it'll get mangled in the process...)
 
 (I'm not one for coming up with creative names, so it's SOMETHING)
 Then I loop around a read for each file, then manually run a for loop
 from 0 to BLOCK_SIZE, copy the size_t value into a new dynamic array
 (one for each of the files opened), and run a function to ensure all
 values in the size_t array are the same. If not, I compare each ubyte
 value (via the byte_union) to determine which bytes are not correct by
 adding each byte to a separate array, and comparing each value in that
 array, printing the address and values of each bad byte as I encounter
 them.
 
 This appears to work great. Some justifications:
 I used size_t because I'm under the impression it's a platform
 specific size that best fits into a single register, thus making
 comparisons faster than byte-by-byte.
 I used a union to extract the bytes from the size_t
 I wanted to create a SOMETHING for each file at run-time, instead of
 only allowing a certain number of SOMETHINGS (either hard coded, or a
 limit).
 Originally I wrote my own comparison function, but in my search for
 something more functional, I tried out std.algorithm's count. Can't
 say I can tell if it's better or worse.
 
 Features I'll probably add if I have to keep using the tool:
 1) Better support for starting points and bytes to read.
 2) Threshold for errors encountered, perferrably managed by a
 command-line argument.
 3) Coalescing error messages in sequential byte sequences.
 
 When I run the program, it's certainly I/O bound at 30Mb/s to an
 external USB drive :).
 
 So the question is, how would you make it more D-ish? (Do we have a
 term analogous to "pythonic" for D? :))
 
 
 Code:
 
 import std.stdio;
 import std.file;
 import std.conv;
 import std.getopt;
 import std.algorithm;
 
 enum BLOCK_SIZE = 1024;
 union byte_union
 {
 size_t val;
 ubyte[val.sizeof] bytes;
 }
 struct SOMETHING
 {
 string file_name;
 size_t size_bytes;
 File fd;
 byte_union[BLOCK_SIZE] bytes;
 }

I would use TypeNames and nonTypeNames, so, blockSize, ByteUnion, Something, sizeBytes, etc.

I haven't used TypeNames or nonTypeNames. Do have some reference material for me? Searching http://www.d-programming-language.org/ didn't give me anything that sounds like what you're talking about.

I believe that he was talking about how you named your variables and type names. Normall in D, user-defined types use pascal case (e.g. Something and ByteUnion, not SOMETHING and byte_union), and everything else uses camelcase (e.g. blockSize and fileName, not BLOCK_SIZE and file_name). It's an issue of style. You can name your variables however you'd like to, but what you're doing doesn't match what most of the people around here do, which can make it harder to read the code that you post. He was simply suggesting that you follow the more typical D naming conventions. It's completely up to you though. - Jonathan M Davis
Aug 05 2011
prev sibling parent Pelle <pelle.mansson gmail.com> writes:
On Fri, 05 Aug 2011 18:43:27 +0200, Kai Meyer <kai unixlords.com> wrote:

 On 08/05/2011 03:02 AM, Pelle wrote:
 Don't declare variables until you need them, just leave bytes_read and
 bytes_max here.

D-Factor suggestion?

Just style and D-factor :-) Also, resulting code is shorter, and you can replace a lot of type names with auto.
 I don't understand why you use ByteUnion instead of just a plain array
 of bytes.

comparing 8 bytes at a time (size_t on 64bit) and failing over to the byte-by-byte comparison only when the size_t value was different.

Maybe, but that's something that should be benchmarked. If a byte array is just as fast, and the code is simpler, that's a better solution :)
Aug 07 2011