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digitalmars.D.learn - How to implement predicates for Filter!(Pred, Tuple)

reply Tobias Pankrath <tobias pankrath.net> writes:
I've written a Filter-Template, which implements the well-known function for
template arguments:

-----
template Filter(alias SPred, E...)
{
    static if(E.length == 0) {
        alias TypeTuple!() Filter;
    }
    else
    {
        static if(SPred!(E[0]))
        {
            alias TypeTuple!(E[0], Filter!(SPred, E[1..$])) Filter;
        }
        else
        {
            alias Filter!(SPred, E[1..$]) Filter;
        }
    }
}
------

This works just fine:
---
template IsEqual(int This)
{
    template IsEqual(int That)
    {
        enum bool IsEqual = This == That;
    }
}

static assert(is(Filter!(IsEqual!5, 5,1,5,1,5) == TypeTuple!(5, 5, 5)));
---

However I can't use it directly, for example like this:
 pragma(msg, IsEqual!(5)!5);

However if I wouldn't rely on the ETT, and use a different name for the inner template, it will work. --- template IsEqual(int This) { template Pred(int That) { enum bool Pred = This == That; } } pragma(msg, IsEqual!(5).Pred!(5)); --- But that will make IsEqual less elegant to use in conjunction with filter. So, is there a way to elegantly use one template in both cases? Otherwise I would declare two versions: one with a single and one with two parameter. -- Tobias
Nov 11 2011
parent reply Timon Gehr <timon.gehr gmx.ch> writes:
On 11/11/2011 11:04 AM, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
 I've written a Filter-Template, which implements the well-known function for
 template arguments:

 -----
 template Filter(alias SPred, E...)
 {
      static if(E.length == 0) {
          alias TypeTuple!() Filter;
      }
      else
      {
          static if(SPred!(E[0]))
          {
              alias TypeTuple!(E[0], Filter!(SPred, E[1..$])) Filter;
          }
          else
          {
              alias Filter!(SPred, E[1..$]) Filter;
          }
      }
 }
 ------

 This works just fine:
 ---
 template IsEqual(int This)
 {
      template IsEqual(int That)
      {
          enum bool IsEqual = This == That;
      }
 }

 static assert(is(Filter!(IsEqual!5, 5,1,5,1,5) == TypeTuple!(5, 5, 5)));
 ---

 However I can't use it directly, for example like this:
 pragma(msg, IsEqual!(5)!5);

However if I wouldn't rely on the ETT, and use a different name for the inner template, it will work. --- template IsEqual(int This) { template Pred(int That) { enum bool Pred = This == That; } } pragma(msg, IsEqual!(5).Pred!(5)); --- But that will make IsEqual less elegant to use in conjunction with filter. So, is there a way to elegantly use one template in both cases? Otherwise I would declare two versions: one with a single and one with two parameter. -- Tobias

This is a sketch of how I would approach your problem. The "Curry" template automatically creates the nested template version from an unnested one. You are then allowed to use both IsEqual!(val) and IsEqual!(val1, val2). template IsEqual(int This, int That){ enum IsEqual = This == That;; } mixin(Curry!IsEqual); static assert(IsEqual!(1,1)); static assert(!IsEqual!(1,2)); alias IsEqual!(1) IsEqual1; static assert(IsEqual1!1); static assert(!IsEqual1!2); // implementation of Curry: import std.array, std.string; template Curry(alias x){ enum Curry = curryImpl(x.stringof); } private string curryImpl(string decl){ auto psta = decl.indexOf("("); auto name = decl[0..psta]; auto pstr = decl[psta+1..$-1]; auto prms = pstr.split(","); string r; foreach(prm; prms) r ~= "template " ~ name ~ "("~prm~"){"; r ~= "enum " ~ name ~ " = ." ~ name ~ "!("; // TODO: make this work for templates not at module scope foreach(prm; prms) r ~= prm[prm.indexOf(" ")+1..$]~","; r ~= ");"; foreach(prm; prms) r~="}"; return r; }
Nov 11 2011
parent reply David Nadlinger <see klickverbot.at> writes:
On 11/11/11 6:20 PM, Timon Gehr wrote:
 This is a sketch of how I would approach your problem. The "Curry"
 template automatically creates the nested template version from an
 unnested one. You are then allowed to use both IsEqual!(val) and
 IsEqual!(val1, val2).
 […]

See also: https://gist.github.com/1191885#L27 Reminds me that I really have to put together a std.meta proposal – if I would only find time to do so… David
Nov 11 2011
parent reply David Nadlinger <see klickverbot.at> writes:
To be more precise, Tobias, my PApply!() would allow you to define your 
predicate »unnested«, i.e. just as a template with two parameters and 
then do StaticFilter!(PApply(IsEqual, 5), …).

But yes, not being able to »chain« template instantiation is quite a 
limitation of the D grammar when it comes to »higher-order templates« 
(at least that's what I like to call them). In some situations, you have 
no other options than to define an Instantiate!() template, see e.g. the 
Gist I posted.

David


On 11/11/11 6:25 PM, David Nadlinger wrote:
 On 11/11/11 6:20 PM, Timon Gehr wrote:
 This is a sketch of how I would approach your problem. The "Curry"
 template automatically creates the nested template version from an
 unnested one. You are then allowed to use both IsEqual!(val) and
 IsEqual!(val1, val2).
 […]

See also: https://gist.github.com/1191885#L27 Reminds me that I really have to put together a std.meta proposal – if I would only find time to do so… David

Nov 11 2011
parent reply Tobias Pankrath <tobias pankrath.net> writes:
David Nadlinger wrote:

 To be more precise, Tobias, my PApply!() would allow you to define your
 predicate »unnested«, i.e. just as a template with two parameters and
 then do StaticFilter!(PApply(IsEqual, 5), …).
 
 But yes, not being able to »chain« template instantiation is quite a
 limitation of the D grammar when it comes to »higher-order templates«
 (at least that's what I like to call them). In some situations, you have
 no other options than to define an Instantiate!() template, see e.g. the
 Gist I posted.
 
 David

Awesome, thank you :) That should really make its way into phobos someday. However I wouldn't prefix everything with static, although it seems, that is the way phobos is going to do this. Instead I would use uppercase names for templates to distinguish them from normal functions.
Nov 11 2011
next sibling parent David Nadlinger <see klickverbot.at> writes:
On 11/11/11 9:38 PM, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
 Awesome, thank you :) That should really make its way into phobos someday.
 However I wouldn't prefix everything with static, although it seems, that is
 the way phobos is going to do this. Instead I would use uppercase names for
 templates to distinguish them from normal functions.

I agree with you, prefixing stuff with Static… adds exactly no value. The problem is that Phobos defines quite a few types of similar names for the return type of the »dynamic« higher order functions (or rather defined, Andrei has been migrating them to »opaque« auto retuns), which could lead to confusion. My plan was to drop any prefixes, simply calling the templates Map, Filter, and so on, choosing the case depending on whether a template/type/type-tuple or value is returned, and encourage users to use renamed imports for clarity in cases where it's not obvious (i.e. import meta = std.meta). David
Nov 11 2011
prev sibling parent David Nadlinger <see klickverbot.at> writes:
On 11/11/11 9:38 PM, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
 Awesome, thank you :) That should really make its way into phobos someday.
 However I wouldn't prefix everything with static, although it seems, that is
 the way phobos is going to do this. Instead I would use uppercase names for
 templates to distinguish them from normal functions.

Oh, and you might also be interested in this extended version which allows you to »skip« arguments, e.g. to bind only the second out of three parameters: https://gist.github.com/1359203 David
Nov 11 2011