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digitalmars.D.learn - How many std.concurrency receivers?

reply Charles Hixson <charleshixsn earthlink.net> writes:
I haven't been able to get an idea of how many std.concurrency receivers 
is reasonable.  Is it a reasonable way to implement a cellular automaton 
(assume each cell has a float number of states)...it isn't exactly a 
cellular automaton, but it isn't exactly a neural network, either.  (I 
was considering Erlang, but each cell has variable state, which Erlang 
doesn't have a nice way to do.)

TDPL quotes the recommendation from an Erlang book "Have LOTS of 
threads!", but doesn't really say how to guess at an order of magnitude 
of what's reasonable for D std.concurrency.  People on Erlang say that 
100's of thousands of threads is reasonable.  Is it the same for D?
Oct 10 2012
next sibling parent reply "thedeemon" <dlang thedeemon.com> writes:
On Thursday, 11 October 2012 at 02:21:01 UTC, Charles Hixson 
wrote:
 I haven't been able to get an idea of how many std.concurrency 
 receivers is reasonable.

Currently in std.concurrency each "receiver" lives in its own OS thread, so they are very expensive, 4-10 is fine, 100 may be possible but expensive in terms of RAM and CPU cycles, 1000 is probably too much.
Oct 11 2012
parent reply Charles Hixson <charleshixsn earthlink.net> writes:
On 10/11/2012 12:09 AM, thedeemon wrote:
 On Thursday, 11 October 2012 at 02:21:01 UTC, Charles Hixson wrote:
 I haven't been able to get an idea of how many std.concurrency
 receivers is reasonable.

Currently in std.concurrency each "receiver" lives in its own OS thread, so they are very expensive, 4-10 is fine, 100 may be possible but expensive in terms of RAM and CPU cycles, 1000 is probably too much.

Hmmm...what I'm trying to build is basically a cross between a weighted directed graph and a neural net, with some features of each, but not much in common. Very light-weight processes would be ideal. The only communication should be via message-passing. Each cell would spend most of it's time sitting on a count-down timer waiting to be rolled out to a database of inactive processes, but it needs to maintain local state (weights of links, activation level, etc. nothing fancy.) If I were doing this sequentially, I'd want to use structs for the cells, because class instances would be too heavy. And I'd store them in a hash table keyed by cell-id#. Unfortunately, I don't see any reasonable way of chunking the pieces, so that I can chunk them into 100 relatively independent sets. Or even 1000. 10,000 is probably about the right size for active-at-one-time cells. And if it would handle that, std.concurrency seemed ideal. Do you have any suggestions as to what would be a reasonable better choice? (Outside of going back to sequential.)
Oct 11 2012
parent Charles Hixson <charleshixsn earthlink.net> writes:
On 10/11/2012 11:04 AM, thedeemon wrote:
 On Thursday, 11 October 2012 at 16:09:20 UTC, Charles Hixson wrote:

 Hmmm...what I'm trying to build is basically a cross between a
 weighted directed graph and a neural net, with some features of each,
 but not much in common. Very light-weight processes would be ideal.
 The only communication should be via message-passing. Each cell would
 spend most of it's time sitting on a count-down timer waiting to be
 rolled out to a database of inactive processes, but it needs to
 maintain local state (weights of links, activation level, etc. nothing
 fancy.)

 If I were doing this sequentially, I'd want to use structs for the
 cells, because class instances would be too heavy. And I'd store them
 in a hash table keyed by cell-id#.

 Unfortunately, I don't see any reasonable way of chunking the pieces,
 so that I can chunk them into 100 relatively independent sets. Or even
 1000. 10,000 is probably about the right size for active-at-one-time
 cells. And if it would handle that, std.concurrency seemed ideal.

 Do you have any suggestions as to what would be a reasonable better
 choice? (Outside of going back to sequential.)

Here's how I would try to approach a task of having thousands of independent agents with current std.concurrency. Each agent (cell) is represented by some data structure and its main function which gets one message as input, reacts (possibly changing its state and sending other messages) and returns without blocking. Then I'd create say 16 threads (or 8, anyway a power of 2 which is close to actual number of cores), each of them will have its own message queue, that's given by std.concurrency. Let's say each cell has its own id. I would place cell with id N to the thread number N mod 16. Each thread will have an array of cells mapped to it. Then if some cell sends a message to cell X, it makes sure the message contains cell id of recipient and then sends it to thread X mod 16. Each worker thread runs a loop where it receives next message from its queue, finds the target cell by its id in this thread's array of cells (we can use X / 16 as index) and calls its reaction function. This way all agents are evenly distributed between threads, we're using just 16 threads and 16 queues which work in parallel, and it all acts as if thousands of agents work independently. However this approach does not guarantee even work distribution between cores.

If I could do things that way, it would certainly be a faster design than what I'm considering now. But I'm really concerned about everything fitting into RAM. I'm going to need to think about this. I've got about 8GB of RAM, and I'm on a 64 bit system. So maybe my concerns about things fitting into memory are out of date. (I'm still used to thinking of a 64KB computer as being one with a lot of RAM.) And I notice my disk swap space is totally unused. Hmmmm... Maybe I should even replace the database with a sequential file. Unless D has some limits that I can't recall reading about, that looks like the right way to go, even if it feels wrong. Probably because I learned programming way back when... but reasonably it looks like the right answer. P.S.: There's no way to guarantee that the cores will be used evenly, because the cells definitely AREN'T even in their use. And while the distribution of use isn't random, it also isn't predictable...and varies over time. So don't worry about this approach not guaranteeing equal distribution of work. =------------below is my first impressions That's a nice approach, though I can't use a vector of cells in each thread, because the cells roll in and out depending on their level of activity, and all active (i.e. ram-resident) cells will need to be accessed occasionally to age their activity, so that will need to be a hash table (i.e. associative array). Also, I only have about 8-hyperthreads. So I guess what I'll do is run all the cells in one thread (to simplify the logic) and in other threads do things like manage the database, etc. Not what I was hoping for, but probably a much more reasonable match to the hardware. (Also, I'll want to have a few extra threads available for things like background e-mail polling, etc. Or even debuggers.) I guess that a part of the problem (i.e., why I can't adopt your suggestion) is that there's no way all the cells would fit into RAM. (Or maybe I'm wrong. There will probably be only a few million total. And each one will probably be less than a kilobyte in size. [You'll note I don't have very precise estimates yet. That will take months to years to develop.]) Still, if I adopt this serialized variation, it will be relatively easy to split it several ways in the future if I get fancier hardware, and if I decide that all the nodes WILL fit into RAM. So I guess what I should do is build the serial version, but ensure that it remains feasible to convert it into the chunked-parallel version that you described. Certainly if I could replace the associative array by a simple vector that would speed up lots of parts of it, and so would eliminating the rolling in and out of cells.
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> writes:
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On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 09:09 +0200, thedeemon wrote:
 On Thursday, 11 October 2012 at 02:21:01 UTC, Charles Hixson=20
 wrote:
 I haven't been able to get an idea of how many std.concurrency=20
 receivers is reasonable.

Currently in std.concurrency each "receiver" lives in its own OS=20 thread, so they are very expensive, 4-10 is fine, 100 may be=20 possible but expensive in terms of RAM and CPU cycles, 1000 is=20 probably too much.

In the beginning processors weren't doing enough so processes were invented. Processes were too expensive so threads were invented. Now threads are too expensive. How the world goes round :-) More constructively: there is an implication here that each receiver is bound explicitly and permanently to a thread. I would have thought the step would be de-couple receiver and thread, run a thread pool and then dynamically bind to receivers as needed. I haven't read the earlier emails in the thread nor checked the code so I may be way off with the above. Apologies if so. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "thedeemon" <dlang thedeemon.com> writes:
On Thursday, 11 October 2012 at 16:09:20 UTC, Charles Hixson 
wrote:

 Hmmm...what I'm trying to build is basically a cross between a 
 weighted directed graph and a neural net, with some features of 
 each, but not much in common.  Very light-weight processes 
 would be ideal.  The only communication should be via 
 message-passing.  Each cell would spend most of it's time 
 sitting on a count-down timer waiting to be rolled out to a 
 database of inactive processes, but it needs to maintain local 
 state (weights of links, activation level, etc.  nothing fancy.)

 If I were doing this sequentially, I'd want to use structs for 
 the cells, because class instances would be too heavy.  And I'd 
 store them in a hash table keyed by cell-id#.

 Unfortunately, I don't see any reasonable way of chunking the 
 pieces, so that I can chunk them into 100 relatively 
 independent sets.  Or even 1000.  10,000 is probably about the 
 right size for active-at-one-time cells.  And if it would 
 handle that, std.concurrency seemed ideal.

 Do you have any suggestions as to what would be a reasonable 
 better choice?  (Outside of going back to sequential.)

Here's how I would try to approach a task of having thousands of independent agents with current std.concurrency. Each agent (cell) is represented by some data structure and its main function which gets one message as input, reacts (possibly changing its state and sending other messages) and returns without blocking. Then I'd create say 16 threads (or 8, anyway a power of 2 which is close to actual number of cores), each of them will have its own message queue, that's given by std.concurrency. Let's say each cell has its own id. I would place cell with id N to the thread number N mod 16. Each thread will have an array of cells mapped to it. Then if some cell sends a message to cell X, it makes sure the message contains cell id of recipient and then sends it to thread X mod 16. Each worker thread runs a loop where it receives next message from its queue, finds the target cell by its id in this thread's array of cells (we can use X / 16 as index) and calls its reaction function. This way all agents are evenly distributed between threads, we're using just 16 threads and 16 queues which work in parallel, and it all acts as if thousands of agents work independently. However this approach does not guarantee even work distribution between cores.
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> writes:
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On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 20:04 +0200, thedeemon wrote:
[=E2=80=A6]
 Here's how I would try to approach a task of having thousands of=20
 independent agents with current std.concurrency. Each agent=20
 (cell) is represented by some data structure and its main=20
 function which gets one message as input, reacts (possibly=20
 changing its state and sending other messages) and returns=20
 without blocking. Then I'd create say 16 threads (or 8, anyway a=20
 power of 2 which is close to actual number of cores), each of=20
 them will have its own message queue, that's given by=20
 std.concurrency. Let's say each cell has its own id. I would=20
 place cell with id N to the thread number N mod 16. Each thread=20
 will have an array of cells mapped to it. Then if some cell sends=20
 a message to cell X, it makes sure the message contains cell id=20
 of recipient and then sends it to thread X mod 16. Each worker=20
 thread runs a loop where it receives next message from its queue,=20
 finds the target cell by its id in this thread's array of cells=20
 (we can use X / 16 as index) and calls its reaction function.=20
 This way all agents are evenly distributed between threads, we're=20
 using just 16 threads and 16 queues which work in parallel, and=20
 it all acts as if thousands of agents work independently. However=20
 this approach does not guarantee even work distribution between=20
 cores.

Can't this be done now using tasks and a threadpool from std.parallel? And I believe (in that I can't point you at explicit data just now), that it is generally best to have 1 or 2 more threads than there are cores to get optimal performance. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "thedeemon" <dlang thedeemon.com> writes:
On Thursday, 11 October 2012 at 18:43:37 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:

 Can't this be done now using tasks and a threadpool from 
 std.parallel?

As far as I understand that would essentially mean a single queue of tasks which is accessed concurrently by workers hungry of work (one point of locking), and if one cell receives two messages with little time interval inbetween then two different threads can pick up the tasks of reacting to those messages and run in parallel which means two threads may try to change cell's state simultaneously unless you add a lock to each cell or somehow organize pinning cells to particular threads. Doesn't look good to me, unless there is a very different design.
 And I believe (in that I can't point you at explicit data just 
 now),
 that it is generally best to have 1 or 2 more threads than 
 there are cores to get optimal performance.

I guess it depends very much on the tasks being executed. If they do some I/O or other blocking operations, additional threads may indeed help keep CPU cores busy.
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "thedeemon" <dlang thedeemon.com> writes:
My biggest concern here is with this number of agents 
communicating to each other via message passing it would mean 
huge number of memory allocations for the messages, but in 
current D runtime allocation is locking (and GC too), so it may 
kill all the parallelism if reactions to messages are short and 
simple. D is no Erlang in this regard.
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> writes:
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On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 21:26 +0200, thedeemon wrote:
 On Thursday, 11 October 2012 at 18:43:37 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
=20
 Can't this be done now using tasks and a threadpool from=20
 std.parallel?

As far as I understand that would essentially mean a single queue=20 of tasks which is accessed concurrently by workers hungry of work=20 (one point of locking), and if one cell receives two messages=20 with little time interval inbetween then two different threads=20 can pick up the tasks of reacting to those messages and run in=20 parallel which means two threads may try to change cell's state=20 simultaneously unless you add a lock to each cell or somehow=20 organize pinning cells to particular threads. Doesn't look good=20 to me, unless there is a very different design.

Many actor systems that deal with very large numbers of messages per second are based on single threaded event-driven engines. JActor, PyActor, etc. Alternatively use Concurrent Sequential Processes. The key here is concurrent, sequential, processes :-) Python-CSP has them. PyCSP has them. Go has them. C++CSP2 has them. JCSP has them. GroovyCSP has them. It's all about the sequential processes and the rendezvous semantics. And also the select operation.
 And I believe (in that I can't point you at explicit data just=20
 now),
 that it is generally best to have 1 or 2 more threads than=20
 there are cores to get optimal performance.

I guess it depends very much on the tasks being executed. If they=20 do some I/O or other blocking operations, additional threads may=20 indeed help keep CPU cores busy.

Cores being busy is not an important metric. Number of useful applications actions is far more important, even if this means most cores are idle most of the time. The rational for more threads than cores is indeed blocking, be it I/O or otherwise. The serious problem is cache-line contention, which is where Threading Building Blocks makes a big win. Sadly I seem to have used examples none of which relate to D :-( --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
On Oct 10, 2012, at 6:55 PM, Charles Hixson <charleshixsn earthlink.net> =
wrote:
=20
 TDPL quotes the recommendation from an Erlang book "Have LOTS of =

of what's reasonable for D std.concurrency. People on Erlang say that = 100's of thousands of threads is reasonable. Is it the same for D? Not currently. spawn() generates a kernel thread, unlike a user-space = thread as in Erlang, so you really can't go too crazy with spawning = before the cost of context switches starts to hurt. There was a thread = about this recently in digitalmars.D, I believe. To summarize, the = issue blocking a move to user-space threads is the technical problem of = making thread-local statics instead be local to a user-space thread. = That said, if you don't care about that detail it would be pretty easy = to make std.concurrency use Fibers instead of Threads.=
Oct 11 2012
parent reply Charles Hixson <charleshixsn earthlink.net> writes:
On 10/11/2012 01:49 PM, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Oct 10, 2012, at 6:55 PM, Charles Hixson<charleshixsn earthlink.net>  wrote:
 TDPL quotes the recommendation from an Erlang book "Have LOTS of threads!",
but doesn't really say how to guess at an order of magnitude of what's
reasonable for D std.concurrency.  People on Erlang say that 100's of thousands
of threads is reasonable.  Is it the same for D?

Not currently. spawn() generates a kernel thread, unlike a user-space thread as in Erlang, so you really can't go too crazy with spawning before the cost of context switches starts to hurt. There was a thread about this recently in digitalmars.D, I believe. To summarize, the issue blocking a move to user-space threads is the technical problem of making thread-local statics instead be local to a user-space thread. That said, if you don't care about that detail it would be pretty easy to make std.concurrency use Fibers instead of Threads.

I'm not clear on what Fibers are. From Ruby they seem to mean co-routines, and that doesn't have much advantage. But it also seems as if other languages have other meanings. TDPL doesn't list fiber in the index. I just found them in core.thread... but I'm still quite confused about what their advantages are, and how to properly use them. OTOH, it looks as if Fibers are heavier than classes, and I was already planning on using structs rather than classes mainly because classes are heavier. And if processes are even heavier... well, I need to use a different design. Perhaps I can divvy the structs up four ways as in std.concurrency. Perhaps I should use a parallel foreach, as in std.parallelism. (That one looks really plausible. but I'm not sure what the overhead is when I'm doing more than a simple multiplication. Still, the example *looks* quite promising for this application.) One of the advantages of std.parallelism::foreach is that I can code the application in serial as normal, and then add the parallelism later. I wasn't intending to have deterministic interaction between the pieces anyway. (But I am intending that some of the cells will send messages to other cells. Something on the order of cells[i].bumpActivity; being issued by a cell other than cell i.)
Oct 11 2012
parent reply Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> writes:
On 14-Oct-12 20:19, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Oct 12, 2012, at 2:29 AM, Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> wrote:

 On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 20:30 -0700, Charles Hixson wrote:
 […]
 I'm not clear on what Fibers are.  From Ruby they seem to mean
 co-routines, and that doesn't have much advantage.  But it also seems as

I think the emerging consensus is that threads allow for pre-emptive scheduling whereas fibres do not. So yes as in Ruby, fibres are collaborative co-routines. Stackless Python is similar.

Yep. If fibers were used in std.concurrency there would basically be an implicit yield in send and receive.

Makes me wonder how it will work with blocking I/O and the like. If all of (few of) threads get blocked this way that going to stall all of (thousands of) fibers. -- Dmitry Olshansky
Oct 14 2012
parent Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> writes:
On 15-Oct-12 05:58, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Oct 14, 2012, at 9:59 AM, Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> wrote:

 On 14-Oct-12 20:19, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Oct 12, 2012, at 2:29 AM, Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> wrote:

 On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 20:30 -0700, Charles Hixson wrote:
 […]
 I'm not clear on what Fibers are.  From Ruby they seem to mean
 co-routines, and that doesn't have much advantage.  But it also seems as

I think the emerging consensus is that threads allow for pre-emptive scheduling whereas fibres do not. So yes as in Ruby, fibres are collaborative co-routines. Stackless Python is similar.

Yep. If fibers were used in std.concurrency there would basically be an implicit yield in send and receive.

Makes me wonder how it will work with blocking I/O and the like. If all of (few of) threads get blocked this way that going to stall all of (thousands of) fibers.

Ideally, IO would be nonblocking with a yield there too, at least if the operation would block.

I'm wondering if it will be possible to (sort of) intercept all common I/O calls in 3rd party C libraries. Something like using our own "wrapper" on top of C runtime but that leaves BSD sockets and a ton of WinAPI/Posix primitives to care about. -- Dmitry Olshansky
Oct 15 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
On Oct 11, 2012, at 12:39 PM, thedeemon <dlang thedeemon.com> wrote:

 My biggest concern here is with this number of agents communicating to =

allocations for the messages, but in current D runtime allocation is = locking (and GC too), so it may kill all the parallelism if reactions to = messages are short and simple. D is no Erlang in this regard. I've experimented with using free lists for message data but didn't see = any notable speedup. If someone can produce an example where = allocations are a limiting factor, I'd be happy to revisit this.=
Oct 11 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> writes:
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 20:30 -0700, Charles Hixson wrote:
[=E2=80=A6]
 I'm not clear on what Fibers are.  From Ruby they seem to mean=20
 co-routines, and that doesn't have much advantage.  But it also seems as=

[=E2=80=A6] I think the emerging consensus is that threads allow for pre-emptive scheduling whereas fibres do not. So yes as in Ruby, fibres are collaborative co-routines. Stackless Python is similar. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Oct 12 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
On Oct 12, 2012, at 2:29 AM, Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> wrote:

 On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 20:30 -0700, Charles Hixson wrote:
 [=E2=80=A6]
 I'm not clear on what Fibers are.  =46rom Ruby they seem to mean=20
 co-routines, and that doesn't have much advantage.  But it also seems as

=20 I think the emerging consensus is that threads allow for pre-emptive scheduling whereas fibres do not. So yes as in Ruby, fibres are collaborative co-routines. Stackless Python is similar.

Yep. If fibers were used in std.concurrency there would basically be an impl= icit yield in send and receive.=20=
Oct 14 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
On Oct 14, 2012, at 9:59 AM, Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> wrote:=


 On 14-Oct-12 20:19, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Oct 12, 2012, at 2:29 AM, Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> wrote:
=20
 On Thu, 2012-10-11 at 20:30 -0700, Charles Hixson wrote:
 [=E2=80=A6]
 I'm not clear on what Fibers are.  =46rom Ruby they seem to mean
 co-routines, and that doesn't have much advantage.  But it also seems a=




 [=E2=80=A6]
=20
 I think the emerging consensus is that threads allow for pre-emptive
 scheduling whereas fibres do not. So yes as in Ruby, fibres are
 collaborative co-routines. Stackless Python is similar.

Yep. If fibers were used in std.concurrency there would basically be an i=


=20
 Makes me wonder how it will work with blocking I/O and the like. If all of=

of) fibers. Ideally, IO would be nonblocking with a yield there too, at least if the ope= ration would block.=20=
Oct 14 2012
prev sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
On Oct 15, 2012, at 9:35 AM, Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> =
wrote:
=20
 I'm wondering if it will be possible to (sort of) intercept all common =

"wrapper" on top of C runtime but that leaves BSD sockets and a ton of = WinAPI/Posix primitives to care about. It's possible, but I don't know that I want to inject our own behavior = into what users think is a C system call. I'd probably put the behavior = into whatever networking API is added to Phobos though. Still not sure = if this should be opt-out or not though, or how that would work.=
Oct 15 2012