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digitalmars.D.learn - Function that calculates in compile time when it can

reply "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> writes:
I want to write a fibonacci(n) function that calculates the 
result.
a) if n is known at compile time, use a template
b) if not, use a normal function

I know how to write a template version:
template fib(ulong n)
{
	static if( n < 2 )
		const fib = n;
	else
		const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);
}

But how can I 'know' if n is known at compile time to make it use 
the other version? (which I won't post 'cause it is fairly easy).
Aug 06 2012
next sibling parent "Tobias Pankrath" <tobias pankrath.net> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 12:21:38 UTC, Minas Mina wrote:
 I want to write a fibonacci(n) function that calculates the 
 result.
 a) if n is known at compile time, use a template
 b) if not, use a normal function

 I know how to write a template version:
 template fib(ulong n)
 {
 	static if( n < 2 )
 		const fib = n;
 	else
 		const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);
 }

 But how can I 'know' if n is known at compile time to make it 
 use the other version? (which I won't post 'cause it is fairly 
 easy).

What exactly do you try to accomplish? Why can't you use CTFE instead of a template? You can check for compile time with static if(__ctfe)
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> writes:
Something like this:

template fib(ulong n)
{
	static if( n < 2 )
		const fib = n;
	else
		const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);
	
	if( n < 2)
		return n;
	return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}

It doesn't work of course, as I am in a template and trying to 
"return" something.

CTFE? Is that "compile time function evaluation"? If yes, it's 
really slow...
If I try:
static x = fib(40); // fib is a normal function

it takes forever and makes my pc run really slowly.
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Eyyub" <eyyub.pangearaion gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 13:46:14 UTC, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
 You can check for compile time with

 static if(__ctfe)

__ctfe is a "CTFE-ed"(?) value. But you can do something like that : http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/e3f26239 Minas : I don't know if your PC is outdated, but it's weird. :/
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Artur Skawina <art.08.09 gmail.com> writes:
On 08/06/12 15:46, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
 On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 12:21:38 UTC, Minas Mina wrote:
 I want to write a fibonacci(n) function that calculates the result.
 a) if n is known at compile time, use a template
 b) if not, use a normal function

 I know how to write a template version:
 template fib(ulong n)
 {
     static if( n < 2 )
         const fib = n;
     else
         const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);
 }

 But how can I 'know' if n is known at compile time to make it use the other
version? (which I won't post 'cause it is fairly easy).

What exactly do you try to accomplish? Why can't you use CTFE instead of a template?

He wants the function to be evaluated at compile time if that is possible, but at runtime if that can't be done; and *not* have to handle both cases in every caller. Which I can't think of any way to do right now. An "T fib(T)(enum T n)" overload that would enable cases like this (and bearophiles ranged-integers) to work, has been proposed in the past (only with 'static' instead of 'enum'; the latter fits better). IOW a "fib(42)" call would map to more or less: enum T c = 42; fib(c); and inside such an overload the argument 'n' would be treated just like if it had been defined as: enum T n = 42; ie it would be cfte'able and /then/ static-if and friends would be able to handle the rest. artur
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 14:25:29 UTC, Eyyub wrote:
 On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 13:46:14 UTC, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
 You can check for compile time with

 static if(__ctfe)

__ctfe is a "CTFE-ed"(?) value. But you can do something like that : http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/e3f26239 Minas : I don't know if your PC is outdated, but it's weird. :/

It's Ubuntu 12.04 running on an Intel i5. That's what I tried to calculate: static x = fib(40); ulong fib(ulong n) { if(n < 2) return n; else return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2); } Maybe because it has a lot of recursion?
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Philippe Sigaud <philippe.sigaud gmail.com> writes:
On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 3:54 PM, Minas Mina <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
 Something like this:


 template fib(ulong n)
 {
         static if( n < 2 )
                 const fib = n;
         else
                 const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);

         if( n < 2)
                 return n;
         return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
 }

 It doesn't work of course, as I am in a template and trying to "return"
 something.

 CTFE? Is that "compile time function evaluation"? If yes, it's really
 slow...

 If I try:
 static x = fib(40); // fib is a normal function

 it takes forever and makes my pc run really slowly.

Well, you're using the worst possible algorithm to calculate Fibonacci (exponential time), so it's no wonder it's taking foverer :) Then, you've to know that CT calculation is far slower than runtime calculation. My experience on this is about an order of magnitude slower, and even more. On the machine I'm currently on, fib(30) is calculated instantaneously at runtime, but it takes 4-6s at CT. Fib(40) aloready takes 4-6 s at runtime, so I won't test at CT :) To come back to your question. __ctfe should be used with a standard (non-static) if. Here I implement to Fibonacci algos, one linear in n at CT, one exponential ar RT. That's just to show that a good algo at CT can run circles around a bad algo at RT. At compile-time, getting fib(100) is instantaneous, while getting only fib(40) at RT takes a few seconds on my machine. import std.conv: to; import std.stdio; long fib(size_t n) { if(__ctfe) // compile-time, linear, sustained development { long[] temp = new long[](n+1); // dynamic array during CTFE, D rox temp[0] = 1; temp[1] = 1; size_t p = 1; while (p < n) { ++p; temp[p] = temp[p-1]+temp[p-2]; } return -temp[p]; // '-' as an indication that this indeed took place at CT } else // runtime, exponential, woohoo baby! { if (n == 0 || n == 1) return 1; else return fib(n-1)+fib(n-2); } } void main() { enum f1 = fib(100); // CT pragma(msg, "At CT, fib(100) = " ~to!string(f1)); // will be < 0 as a flag auto f2 = fib(40); // RT writeln("At RT, fib(40) = ", f2); } Don't try fib(100) at runtime!
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Tobias Pankrath" <tobias pankrath.net> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 15:18:22 UTC, Minas Mina wrote:
 That's what I tried to calculate:
 static x = fib(40);

 ulong fib(ulong n)
 {
 	if(n < 2)
 		return n;
 	else
 		return fib(n-1) +  fib(n-2);
 }

 Maybe because it has a lot of recursion?

That algorithm makes O(2^n) calls to fib. I think templates get only expanded once for every set of parameters, so you get memoization build in and thus it's faster in this case.
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 15:21:38 UTC, Philippe Sigaud wrote:
 On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 3:54 PM, Minas Mina 
 <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
 Something like this:


 template fib(ulong n)
 {
         static if( n < 2 )
                 const fib = n;
         else
                 const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);

         if( n < 2)
                 return n;
         return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
 }

 It doesn't work of course, as I am in a template and trying to 
 "return"
 something.

 CTFE? Is that "compile time function evaluation"? If yes, it's 
 really
 slow...

 If I try:
 static x = fib(40); // fib is a normal function

 it takes forever and makes my pc run really slowly.

Well, you're using the worst possible algorithm to calculate Fibonacci (exponential time), so it's no wonder it's taking foverer :) Then, you've to know that CT calculation is far slower than runtime calculation. My experience on this is about an order of magnitude slower, and even more. On the machine I'm currently on, fib(30) is calculated instantaneously at runtime, but it takes 4-6s at CT. Fib(40) aloready takes 4-6 s at runtime, so I won't test at CT :) To come back to your question. __ctfe should be used with a standard (non-static) if. Here I implement to Fibonacci algos, one linear in n at CT, one exponential ar RT. That's just to show that a good algo at CT can run circles around a bad algo at RT. At compile-time, getting fib(100) is instantaneous, while getting only fib(40) at RT takes a few seconds on my machine. import std.conv: to; import std.stdio; long fib(size_t n) { if(__ctfe) // compile-time, linear, sustained development { long[] temp = new long[](n+1); // dynamic array during CTFE, D rox temp[0] = 1; temp[1] = 1; size_t p = 1; while (p < n) { ++p; temp[p] = temp[p-1]+temp[p-2]; } return -temp[p]; // '-' as an indication that this indeed took place at CT } else // runtime, exponential, woohoo baby! { if (n == 0 || n == 1) return 1; else return fib(n-1)+fib(n-2); } } void main() { enum f1 = fib(100); // CT pragma(msg, "At CT, fib(100) = " ~to!string(f1)); // will be < 0 as a flag auto f2 = fib(40); // RT writeln("At RT, fib(40) = ", f2); } Don't try fib(100) at runtime!

Thank you for your reply! Haha, yeah, I knew I was using the worst possible algorithm. I
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 15:21:38 UTC, Philippe Sigaud wrote:
 On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 3:54 PM, Minas Mina 
 <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
 Something like this:


 template fib(ulong n)
 {
         static if( n < 2 )
                 const fib = n;
         else
                 const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);

         if( n < 2)
                 return n;
         return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
 }

 It doesn't work of course, as I am in a template and trying to 
 "return"
 something.

 CTFE? Is that "compile time function evaluation"? If yes, it's 
 really
 slow...

 If I try:
 static x = fib(40); // fib is a normal function

 it takes forever and makes my pc run really slowly.

Well, you're using the worst possible algorithm to calculate Fibonacci (exponential time), so it's no wonder it's taking foverer :) Then, you've to know that CT calculation is far slower than runtime calculation. My experience on this is about an order of magnitude slower, and even more. On the machine I'm currently on, fib(30) is calculated instantaneously at runtime, but it takes 4-6s at CT. Fib(40) aloready takes 4-6 s at runtime, so I won't test at CT :) To come back to your question. __ctfe should be used with a standard (non-static) if. Here I implement to Fibonacci algos, one linear in n at CT, one exponential ar RT. That's just to show that a good algo at CT can run circles around a bad algo at RT. At compile-time, getting fib(100) is instantaneous, while getting only fib(40) at RT takes a few seconds on my machine. import std.conv: to; import std.stdio; long fib(size_t n) { if(__ctfe) // compile-time, linear, sustained development { long[] temp = new long[](n+1); // dynamic array during CTFE, D rox temp[0] = 1; temp[1] = 1; size_t p = 1; while (p < n) { ++p; temp[p] = temp[p-1]+temp[p-2]; } return -temp[p]; // '-' as an indication that this indeed took place at CT } else // runtime, exponential, woohoo baby! { if (n == 0 || n == 1) return 1; else return fib(n-1)+fib(n-2); } } void main() { enum f1 = fib(100); // CT pragma(msg, "At CT, fib(100) = " ~to!string(f1)); // will be < 0 as a flag auto f2 = fib(40); // RT writeln("At RT, fib(40) = ", f2); } Don't try fib(100) at runtime!

Thank you for your reply! Haha, yeah, I knew I was using the worst possible algorithm. It was just for testing... I'm never going to use ctfe with algorithms of that complexity again! Ok, so I can use if(__ctfe) to define different behaviour(or not) at compile time than at runtime. The way I want to use it, however, I don't have to: import std.stdio; void main() { ulong f1 = fibonacci(50); // calculated at runtime static f2 = fibonacci(50); // calculated at compile time writeln(f); } // calcuated at O(1) woohoo! ulong fibonacci(ulong n) { import std.math; double r0 = (1 + sqrt(5.0)) / 2.0, r1 = (1 - sqrt(5.0)) / 2.0, a = 1.0 / sqrt(5.0), b = -1.0 / sqrt(5.0); // fn = a*r0 + b*r1 return cast(ulong)(a * pow(r0, cast(double)n) + b * pow(r1, cast(double)n)); } What I was really looking for was to do something like the way std.math.sin works. I read somewhere that if the argument is available at compile time, it evaluates the result at compile time. So, if I do: double f = sin(0.5); // calculated at compile time or not? If it is calculated at compile time, how do I do it for my own functions? If not, I guess the only way is to use static or enum like you guys showed me.
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Philippe Sigaud <philippe.sigaud gmail.com> writes:
On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 5:33 PM, Minas Mina <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> wrote:

 // calcuated at O(1) woohoo!

         return cast(ulong)(a * pow(r0, cast(double)n) + b * pow(r1,

I wonder if there is any rounding error going on with these pow, but yes, even better this way.
 double f = sin(0.5); // calculated at compile time or not?

 If it is calculated at compile time, how do I do it for my own functions?

sin is a library function, it has no special rights your own function doesn't as far as I know. I'd say, put an if(__ctfe) in sin: if (__ctfe) { pragma(msg, "Yep, CT"); return 2.0; } else { // standard sin code } And tell us the result :)
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Namespace" <rswhite4 googlemail.com> writes:
Take a look into std.math:
https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/phobos/blob/master/std/math.d
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 15:56:52 UTC, Namespace wrote:
 Take a look into std.math:
 https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/phobos/blob/master/std/math.d

I found this: real sin(real x) safe pure nothrow; /* intrinsic */ And these: creal sin(creal z) safe pure nothrow { creal cs = expi(z.re); creal csh = coshisinh(z.im); return cs.im * csh.re + cs.re * csh.im * 1i; } /** ditto */ ireal sin(ireal y) safe pure nothrow { return cosh(y.im)*1i; } I don't see anything about ctfe. Maybe I didn't understand well and sin is not evaluated at compile time. Can someone clarify this?
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Eyyub" <eyyub.pangearaion gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 16:17:22 UTC, Minas Mina wrote:
 On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 15:56:52 UTC, Namespace wrote:
 Take a look into std.math:
 https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/phobos/blob/master/std/math.d

I found this: real sin(real x) safe pure nothrow; /* intrinsic */ And these: creal sin(creal z) safe pure nothrow { creal cs = expi(z.re); creal csh = coshisinh(z.im); return cs.im * csh.re + cs.re * csh.im * 1i; } /** ditto */ ireal sin(ireal y) safe pure nothrow { return cosh(y.im)*1i; } I don't see anything about ctfe. Maybe I didn't understand well and sin is not evaluated at compile time. Can someone clarify this?

Justly, you see a normal runtime function, and a CTFE function is a normal runtime function(with some restrictions) that can be interpreted at runtime. static res = sin(4); //compile time auto res = sin(4); //runtime
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "Eyyub" <eyyub.pangearaion gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 6 August 2012 at 16:21:04 UTC, Eyyub wrote:
 Justly, you see a normal runtime function, and a CTFE function 
 is
 a normal runtime function(with some restrictions) that can be
 interpreted at runtime.

Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Philippe Sigaud <philippe.sigaud gmail.com> writes:
On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 6:17 PM, Minas Mina <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk> wrote:

 I found this:

 real sin(real x)  safe pure nothrow; /* intrinsic */

 I don't see anything about ctfe. Maybe I didn't understand well
 and sin is not evaluated at compile time. Can someone clarify
 this?

Oh, I thought they were implemented as polynomial approximations. Never mind, you can test it with any function: int foo(int i) { if (__ctfe) { pragma(msg, "CT"); return -1; } else return 1; } void main() { auto i = foo(0); static j = foo(0); writeln(i); // 1 writeln(j); // -1 } So, auto i doesn't provoke CT-evaluation (else it'd be -1).
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> writes:
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

On Mon, 2012-08-06 at 17:21 +0200, Philippe Sigaud wrote:
[=E2=80=A6]
 Well, you're using the worst possible algorithm to calculate Fibonacci
 (exponential time), so it's no wonder it's taking foverer :)

Memoization is a bit of a help it destroying that problem. [=E2=80=A6]
 Don't try fib(100) at runtime!

Of course the real problem is that quants and such folk often need values of Fibonacci and factorial that cannot be held in an hardware integer. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Philippe Sigaud <philippe.sigaud gmail.com> writes:
On Mon, Aug 6, 2012 at 8:37 PM, Russel Winder <russel winder.org.uk> wrote:
 On Mon, 2012-08-06 at 17:21 +0200, Philippe Sigaud wrote:
 [=E2=80=A6]
 Well, you're using the worst possible algorithm to calculate Fibonacci
 (exponential time), so it's no wonder it's taking foverer :)

Memoization is a bit of a help it destroying that problem.

Memoization at compile-time is a bit tricky, though. Which reminds me... What if someone wants Fibonacci values depending on a runtime value, but would like them to be calculated really fast? Use the "Sabalausky Trick" (aka Nick's Run-Time to Compile-Time Time Machine): Pregenerate desired values at compile-time (for example here in an array), to get O(1) fibonacci access at runtime.
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 8/6/12, Philippe Sigaud <philippe.sigaud gmail.com> wrote:
 Which reminds me... What if someone wants Fibonacci values depending
 on a runtime value, but would like them to be calculated really fast?

I think TDPL had some use of the memoize template and used fibonacci as sample code. It even used it internally for a recursive call. It's somewhere in the book.
Aug 06 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Marco Leise <Marco.Leise gmx.de> writes:
Am Mon, 06 Aug 2012 14:21:37 +0200
schrieb "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk>:

 I want to write a fibonacci(n) function that calculates the 
 result.
 a) if n is known at compile time, use a template
 b) if not, use a normal function
 
 I know how to write a template version:
 template fib(ulong n)
 {
 	static if( n < 2 )
 		const fib = n;
 	else
 		const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);
 }
 
 But how can I 'know' if n is known at compile time to make it use 
 the other version? (which I won't post 'cause it is fairly easy).

That's easy: http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/521f47a0 -- Marco
Aug 07 2012
prev sibling parent Artur Skawina <art.08.09 gmail.com> writes:
On 08/07/12 19:43, Marco Leise wrote:
 Am Mon, 06 Aug 2012 14:21:37 +0200
 schrieb "Minas Mina" <minas_mina1990 hotmail.co.uk>:
 
 I want to write a fibonacci(n) function that calculates the 
 result.
 a) if n is known at compile time, use a template
 b) if not, use a normal function

 I know how to write a template version:
 template fib(ulong n)
 {
 	static if( n < 2 )
 		const fib = n;
 	else
 		const fib = fib!(n-1) + fib!(n-2);
 }

 But how can I 'know' if n is known at compile time to make it use 
 the other version? (which I won't post 'cause it is fairly easy).

That's easy: http://dpaste.dzfl.pl/521f47a0

It's not a function, but a template - meaning not only does it require a different syntax, but also that it can only be used with literals and symbols. Ie 'fib!(expression_not_evaluable_at_ct)' like 'fib!(variable+1)' will fail to compile. artur PS. Your code does not work with older compilers (like the 2.057 based gdc that i'm using); this version works and is also more readable: template isSymbol(alias S) { enum isSymbol = __traits(compiles, __traits(parent, S)); } template fib(alias N) { static if (isSymbol!N) { property typeof(N+N) fib(typeof(N) N = N) { return N<2 ? N : fib(N-1)+fib(N-2); } } else { static if (N<2) alias N fib; else enum fib = fib!(N-1)+fib!(N-2); } }
Aug 08 2012