www.digitalmars.com         C & C++   DMDScript  

digitalmars.D.learn - Expression template

reply Etranger <nonvalidemail nowhere.com> writes:
Hello all,

I will greatly appreciate if you could help me with my first step 
in the D land.

*YOU CAN SKIP DIRECTLY TO THE QUESTION BELLOW*:

Please allow me to introduce myself and give you my feelings 
about the D language then I'll ask my question. I'm a 
mathematician that works mainly on computer vision and machine 
learning for a research institute. All my CV code is written in 
C++ (runs on android and iOs) and no need to say that I'm 
desperately looking to replace it by a more modern language. My 
main complains about C++ are safety, implicit conversion between 
numeric types, tooling (no unified package manager, benchmarking 
or testing framework), verbose generics, poor standard library 
(although boost is great, but then compile time goes crazy), not 
so great at writing "high level" code when needed ... it just old.

I looked into some contenders: D, ocaml, Go, rust, even Haskell! 
GC languages are definitely not an option for computer vision and 
low level machine learning (writing ML libs), so GO, ocaml and 
haskell are out. (Although I use Go for production when I have to 
deal with concurrency and networks (getting energy data from 
sensors or web crawlers). The language is meh but the finishing 
(tooling, stability, documentation and libraries) is great).

So the only left possible alternatives are D and rust. I looked 
into D few years later but didn't look far as it was advertised 
as a GC language and the community (and support) seemed too 
small, and the tooling/libs not so great. I spent allot of time 
following rust and learning it, and put allot of hope in it. 
However, today rust seems to have 3 main deal breaking weaknesses 
for my particular use :

1-Bad C++ interop, and no plans to make it better. For me as for 
many developers in my field, I cannot work without my tools (like 
openCV, Eigen, Armadillo ...). No matter how good the language 
is, if it does not allow me to use well known and tested 
libraries that I need in my day job (or offers equivalent quality 
libs), I just cannot use it, its impossible.

2- Limited support for generics and little interest at enhancing 
them. Generic programming is essential to build highly efficient 
numeric libraries, like Eigen and Armadillo that relays heavily 
on expression templates to avoid temporaries. Rust still does not 
support integer template parameters and its trait based generics 
may be more secure but are very hard to use and impractical for 
non trivial generic code.

3- Memory management. The borrow checker is a real advantage when 
there is a need for highly efficient code. But for the less 
demanding applications in term of efficiency, it is a burden and 
I think a GC is more adapted for such applications.

Although rust is a wonderful language with a great community, The 
points 1 and 2 are deal breaking for me, and are what made me 
return to D and have a better look (expect allot of peoples like 
me I think when the hype start to diminish around rust and people 
that have tasted a modern programming language find them self 
unable to return to C++ but too limited by rust constraints).

By contrast, the 3 main weaknesses of rust (for me) are what 
attract me to the D language:

1- Good foundations for a full C++ interopt. Although we still 
cannot use C++ libs without any bindings like in objective-C. The 
work made so far on the D compiler + Calypso ( 
https://github.com/Syniurge/Calypso ) give me hope that one day, 
I'll just be able to put and "import opencv2.core;" into my code 
and use D in my work. By the way, make Calypso an official 
project to allow full interop with C++, stabilize one compiler on 
all major platforms and I'll throw C++ from the window and never 
look back.

2- Great at generics (hello Andrei !)

3- Optional Gc with I hope full support for non-GC memory 
management soon.

In brief, D is great, if you give it full c++ interop and 
stabilize the compiler(s) and the tooling, get backed by some big 
name in the industry, I think it is condemned to succeed.

****THE QUESTION****

Expression templates are heavily used in C++ to build highly 
efficient linear algebra libraries with lazy evaluation. I order 
to learn D, I'm trying to implement such system in D, so I can 
maybe interface it with ndslices and translate a linear algebra 
lib like Eigen in D.

For a first step, I tried to translate the example given here 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expression_templates , and here is 
my attempt:

***************** start of code ******************
import std.stdio;
import std.traits;
import std.conv;

struct VecExpression(alias mixins) {
   mixin (mixins);
   VecSum!(typeof(this), VecExpression!(RHS)) opBinary(string op, 
alias RHS)(ref VecExpression!(RHS) rhs)
{
   static if (op == "+") return VecSum!(typeof(this), 
VecExpression!(RHS))(&this, &rhs);
}
}


mixin template Vec_impl(int n) {
   double[n] elems;

    disable this();

   this(double[n] e){
     elems=e;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return elems[i];
   }
}

alias Vec(alias n) = VecExpression!("mixin 
Vec_impl!("~to!string(n)~");"); //Vec(int n) does not work

mixin template VecSum_impl(E1, E2) {
   E1 * e1;
   E2 * e2;

    disable this();

   this(E1 * ee1, E2 * ee2){
     e1=ee1;
     e2=ee2;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return (*e1)[i]+(*e2)[i];
   }
}

alias VecSum(E1, E2) = VecExpression!("mixin 
VecSum_impl!("~fullyQualifiedName!E1~","~fullyQualifiedName!E2~");");

void main()
{
   Vec!(3) v1 = Vec!(3)([5., 2., 3.]), v2 = Vec!(3)([1., 4., 3.]), 
v3 = Vec!(3)([3., 2., 1.]);
   auto res = v1+v2;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", v1[i], v2[i],  res[i]);
   }
   auto res2 = res+v3;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", res[i], v3[i],  res2[i]);
   }
   writeln(res);
   writeln(res2);

   // VecExpression!(Vec_impl!(3)) ve; // Error: template instance 
Vec_impl!3 mixin templates are not regular templates
}

***************** end of code ******************

My questions:

1- Is there a cleaner way to do it ? I had to use struct because 
I want every thing to happen at compile time and on the stack 
(without gc). And I had to use string mixins because template 
mixin does not work the way I tried to use it ( see the error 
last line).

2- Is there a safer way to do it (without using pointers) ?

3- Do you think I'll hit a wall with this approach ?

4- Do you known any D libs that uses expression template for 
linear algebra ?

I thank you in advance for your help and wish you a nice weekend 
(and apologize for my bad english) :)
Jul 23 2016
next sibling parent reply rikki cattermole <rikki cattermole.co.nz> writes:
On 23/07/2016 11:05 PM, Etranger wrote:
[snip]

 ***************** start of code ******************
 import std.stdio;
 import std.traits;
 import std.conv;

 struct VecExpression(alias mixins) {
   mixin (mixins);
   VecSum!(typeof(this), VecExpression!(RHS)) opBinary(string op, alias
 RHS)(ref VecExpression!(RHS) rhs)
 {
   static if (op == "+") return VecSum!(typeof(this),
 VecExpression!(RHS))(&this, &rhs);
 }
 }


 mixin template Vec_impl(int n) {
   double[n] elems;

    disable this();

   this(double[n] e){
     elems=e;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return elems[i];
   }
 }

 alias Vec(alias n) = VecExpression!("mixin
 Vec_impl!("~to!string(n)~");"); //Vec(int n) does not work

 mixin template VecSum_impl(E1, E2) {
   E1 * e1;
   E2 * e2;

    disable this();

   this(E1 * ee1, E2 * ee2){
     e1=ee1;
     e2=ee2;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return (*e1)[i]+(*e2)[i];
   }
 }

 alias VecSum(E1, E2) = VecExpression!("mixin
 VecSum_impl!("~fullyQualifiedName!E1~","~fullyQualifiedName!E2~");");

 void main()
 {
   Vec!(3) v1 = Vec!(3)([5., 2., 3.]), v2 = Vec!(3)([1., 4., 3.]), v3 =
 Vec!(3)([3., 2., 1.]);
   auto res = v1+v2;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", v1[i], v2[i],  res[i]);
   }
   auto res2 = res+v3;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", res[i], v3[i],  res2[i]);
   }
   writeln(res);
   writeln(res2);

   // VecExpression!(Vec_impl!(3)) ve; // Error: template instance
 Vec_impl!3 mixin templates are not regular templates
 }

 ***************** end of code ******************

 My questions:

 1- Is there a cleaner way to do it ? I had to use struct because I want
 every thing to happen at compile time and on the stack (without gc). And
 I had to use string mixins because template mixin does not work the way
 I tried to use it ( see the error last line).

 2- Is there a safer way to do it (without using pointers) ?

 3- Do you think I'll hit a wall with this approach ?

 4- Do you known any D libs that uses expression template for linear
 algebra ?

 I thank you in advance for your help and wish you a nice weekend (and
 apologize for my bad english) :)
My goodness that code is awful. I have a fair idea what you are attempting to do here. So I'm going to point you directly to gl3n. Its meant for game dev so won't provide you a 100% solution. But it should give you ideas of how to do it. https://github.com/Dav1dde/gl3n/blob/master/gl3n/linalg.d#L49 If you have any questions and want somebody to talk with you instead of write, reply cycle. Please hop on to Freenode #d channel.
Jul 23 2016
parent reply Etranger <nonvalidemail nowhere.com> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 11:19:34 UTC, rikki cattermole wrote:
 On 23/07/2016 11:05 PM, Etranger wrote:
 [snip]

 ***************** start of code ******************
 import std.stdio;
 import std.traits;
 import std.conv;

 struct VecExpression(alias mixins) {
   mixin (mixins);
   VecSum!(typeof(this), VecExpression!(RHS)) opBinary(string 
 op, alias
 RHS)(ref VecExpression!(RHS) rhs)
 {
   static if (op == "+") return VecSum!(typeof(this),
 VecExpression!(RHS))(&this, &rhs);
 }
 }


 mixin template Vec_impl(int n) {
   double[n] elems;

    disable this();

   this(double[n] e){
     elems=e;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return elems[i];
   }
 }

 alias Vec(alias n) = VecExpression!("mixin
 Vec_impl!("~to!string(n)~");"); //Vec(int n) does not work

 mixin template VecSum_impl(E1, E2) {
   E1 * e1;
   E2 * e2;

    disable this();

   this(E1 * ee1, E2 * ee2){
     e1=ee1;
     e2=ee2;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return (*e1)[i]+(*e2)[i];
   }
 }

 alias VecSum(E1, E2) = VecExpression!("mixin
 VecSum_impl!("~fullyQualifiedName!E1~","~fullyQualifiedName!E2~");");

 void main()
 {
   Vec!(3) v1 = Vec!(3)([5., 2., 3.]), v2 = Vec!(3)([1., 4., 
 3.]), v3 =
 Vec!(3)([3., 2., 1.]);
   auto res = v1+v2;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", v1[i], v2[i],  res[i]);
   }
   auto res2 = res+v3;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", res[i], v3[i],  res2[i]);
   }
   writeln(res);
   writeln(res2);

   // VecExpression!(Vec_impl!(3)) ve; // Error: template 
 instance
 Vec_impl!3 mixin templates are not regular templates
 }

 ***************** end of code ******************

 My questions:

 1- Is there a cleaner way to do it ? I had to use struct 
 because I want
 every thing to happen at compile time and on the stack 
 (without gc). And
 I had to use string mixins because template mixin does not 
 work the way
 I tried to use it ( see the error last line).

 2- Is there a safer way to do it (without using pointers) ?

 3- Do you think I'll hit a wall with this approach ?

 4- Do you known any D libs that uses expression template for 
 linear
 algebra ?

 I thank you in advance for your help and wish you a nice 
 weekend (and
 apologize for my bad english) :)
My goodness that code is awful. I have a fair idea what you are attempting to do here. So I'm going to point you directly to gl3n. Its meant for game dev so won't provide you a 100% solution. But it should give you ideas of how to do it. https://github.com/Dav1dde/gl3n/blob/master/gl3n/linalg.d#L49 If you have any questions and want somebody to talk with you instead of write, reply cycle. Please hop on to Freenode #d channel.
Hi and thanks for your quick replay. A looked to the gl3n code, although the code is clear and clean, it is not really what I want to do in my example. The gl3n is eager evaluation. If I write "v = v1+v2+v3;", then it will create a temporary variable "tmp1=v1+v2;" then a second temp "tmp2=tmp1+v3;" and finally "v=tmp2;". what I'm trying to do to use lazy evaluation in order to create only one tmp that will that will directly hold the result of v1[i]+v2[i]+v3[i]. That concept is then generalized in order to perform more optimization based on entire expression trees, no just tow operands. And thanks for the suggestion regarding the channel, I'll try to use it as soon as I have the time. I feel on advantage of the forum is that it stays for other people and not just for me. best regards
Jul 23 2016
next sibling parent reply rikki cattermole <rikki cattermole.co.nz> writes:
On 24/07/2016 12:09 AM, Etranger wrote:
 On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 11:19:34 UTC, rikki cattermole wrote:
 On 23/07/2016 11:05 PM, Etranger wrote:
 [snip]

 ***************** start of code ******************
 import std.stdio;
 import std.traits;
 import std.conv;

 struct VecExpression(alias mixins) {
   mixin (mixins);
   VecSum!(typeof(this), VecExpression!(RHS)) opBinary(string op, alias
 RHS)(ref VecExpression!(RHS) rhs)
 {
   static if (op == "+") return VecSum!(typeof(this),
 VecExpression!(RHS))(&this, &rhs);
 }
 }


 mixin template Vec_impl(int n) {
   double[n] elems;

    disable this();

   this(double[n] e){
     elems=e;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return elems[i];
   }
 }

 alias Vec(alias n) = VecExpression!("mixin
 Vec_impl!("~to!string(n)~");"); //Vec(int n) does not work

 mixin template VecSum_impl(E1, E2) {
   E1 * e1;
   E2 * e2;

    disable this();

   this(E1 * ee1, E2 * ee2){
     e1=ee1;
     e2=ee2;
   }

   double opIndex(int i) {
     return (*e1)[i]+(*e2)[i];
   }
 }

 alias VecSum(E1, E2) = VecExpression!("mixin
 VecSum_impl!("~fullyQualifiedName!E1~","~fullyQualifiedName!E2~");");

 void main()
 {
   Vec!(3) v1 = Vec!(3)([5., 2., 3.]), v2 = Vec!(3)([1., 4., 3.]), v3 =
 Vec!(3)([3., 2., 1.]);
   auto res = v1+v2;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", v1[i], v2[i],  res[i]);
   }
   auto res2 = res+v3;
   for(int i=0; i < 3; ++i){
     writefln("%f + %f = %f", res[i], v3[i],  res2[i]);
   }
   writeln(res);
   writeln(res2);

   // VecExpression!(Vec_impl!(3)) ve; // Error: template instance
 Vec_impl!3 mixin templates are not regular templates
 }

 ***************** end of code ******************

 My questions:

 1- Is there a cleaner way to do it ? I had to use struct because I want
 every thing to happen at compile time and on the stack (without gc). And
 I had to use string mixins because template mixin does not work the way
 I tried to use it ( see the error last line).

 2- Is there a safer way to do it (without using pointers) ?

 3- Do you think I'll hit a wall with this approach ?

 4- Do you known any D libs that uses expression template for linear
 algebra ?

 I thank you in advance for your help and wish you a nice weekend (and
 apologize for my bad english) :)
My goodness that code is awful. I have a fair idea what you are attempting to do here. So I'm going to point you directly to gl3n. Its meant for game dev so won't provide you a 100% solution. But it should give you ideas of how to do it. https://github.com/Dav1dde/gl3n/blob/master/gl3n/linalg.d#L49 If you have any questions and want somebody to talk with you instead of write, reply cycle. Please hop on to Freenode #d channel.
Hi and thanks for your quick replay. A looked to the gl3n code, although the code is clear and clean, it is not really what I want to do in my example. The gl3n is eager evaluation. If I write "v = v1+v2+v3;", then it will create a temporary variable "tmp1=v1+v2;" then a second temp "tmp2=tmp1+v3;" and finally "v=tmp2;". what I'm trying to do to use lazy evaluation in order to create only one tmp that will that will directly hold the result of v1[i]+v2[i]+v3[i]. That concept is then generalized in order to perform more optimization based on entire expression trees, no just tow operands. And thanks for the suggestion regarding the channel, I'll try to use it as soon as I have the time. I feel on advantage of the forum is that it stays for other people and not just for me. best regards
If you evaluate it as v = a + b + c instead of v = a + (b + c) you will still have a temporary value. Remember structs are just the values they carry and are basically optimized out. Either way I recommend you not worry about it. Compilers can be smart and dmd is mostly good enough in this department. If you use dynamic arrays and not fixed sized arrays, they will go into the heap, so be careful with what you do with them. Fixed sized arrays like gl3n does is fairly cheap since it goes on to the stack and in some cases only in registers. Usually if we solve it on IRC we post the solution that we come up with on the post.
Jul 23 2016
next sibling parent Etranger <nonvalidemail nowhere.com> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 12:27:39 UTC, rikki cattermole wrote:
 If you evaluate it as v = a + b + c instead of v = a + (b + c) 
 you will still have a temporary value. Remember structs are 
 just the values they carry and are basically optimized out. 
 Either way I recommend you not worry about it. Compilers can be 
 smart and dmd is mostly good enough in this department.

 If you use dynamic arrays and not fixed sized arrays, they will 
 go into the heap, so be careful with what you do with them. 
 Fixed sized arrays like gl3n does is fairly cheap since it goes 
 on to the stack and in some cases only in registers.

 Usually if we solve it on IRC we post the solution that we come 
 up with on the post.
For small matrices of fixed size, lazy evaluation may not be worth it, but for large matrices and vectors, it is worth it. For example, for testing purpose, I wrote 2 versions of and MLP (multi-layered perceptron) lib, one that uses openBLAS and one with Eigen. The one with Eigen was significantly faster than the one with openBLAS tanks to lazy evaluation. No wonder all the most known c++ linear algebra lib use this method (Eigen, Armadillo, Blitz++, Boost uBlas, ...). This link http://eigen.tuxfamily.org/dox/TopicLazyEvaluation.html explain better than me the advantages of this technique. Given the emphasize of D over generics, I think it is worth to explore this direction (I hope with better results than what I wrote !).
Jul 23 2016
prev sibling parent ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 12:27:39 UTC, rikki cattermole wrote:
 Either way I recommend you not worry about it. Compilers can be 
 smart and dmd is mostly good enough in this department.
he has something to worry about. remember, this is scientific department, where ours 4x4 matrices are child's play. one removed temporary can save hours of calculations there.
Jul 23 2016
prev sibling parent Seb <seb wilzba.ch> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 12:09:18 UTC, Etranger wrote:
 On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 11:19:34 UTC, rikki cattermole 
 wrote:
 On 23/07/2016 11:05 PM, Etranger wrote:
 [snip]

 [...]
My goodness that code is awful. I have a fair idea what you are attempting to do here. So I'm going to point you directly to gl3n. Its meant for game dev so won't provide you a 100% solution. But it should give you ideas of how to do it. https://github.com/Dav1dde/gl3n/blob/master/gl3n/linalg.d#L49 If you have any questions and want somebody to talk with you instead of write, reply cycle. Please hop on to Freenode #d channel.
Hi and thanks for your quick replay. A looked to the gl3n code, although the code is clear and clean, it is not really what I want to do in my example. The gl3n is eager evaluation. If I write "v = v1+v2+v3;", then it will create a temporary variable "tmp1=v1+v2;" then a second temp "tmp2=tmp1+v3;" and finally "v=tmp2;". what I'm trying to do to use lazy evaluation in order to create only one tmp that will that will directly hold the result of v1[i]+v2[i]+v3[i]. That concept is then generalized in order to perform more optimization based on entire expression trees, no just tow operands. And thanks for the suggestion regarding the channel, I'll try to use it as soon as I have the time. I feel on advantage of the forum is that it stays for other people and not just for me. best regards
You should definitely have a look at mir - the upcoming library for numerical computing in D. https://github.com/libmir/mir There is a lot of working going on recently, for example Ilya is working on building the fattest BLAS library thanks to CTFE introspection etc. You might know Ndslice (in Phobos), the first result of the mir project.
Jul 23 2016
prev sibling next sibling parent reply ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> writes:
2OP: sorry, i can barely read that code. this has nothing to do 
with your skills, it is the topic -- i've never seen clean lazy 
evaluation code. after all, this is a hack.

still, i think that such a library worth at least some work.

as for "is my code/approach is good enough", i know only two 
answers.
1. yes, 'cause it works.
2. no, 'cause it doesn't work.
so if your code works, it is good. ;-)

i mean that such hacks will be somewhat ugly anyway, so just 
write a brief explanation in comments and go on.

sorry, it is probably not what you wanted to hear... ;-)
Jul 23 2016
parent reply Etranger <nonvalidemail nowhere.com> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 19:08:45 UTC, ketmar wrote:
 2OP: sorry, i can barely read that code. this has nothing to do 
 with your skills, it is the topic -- i've never seen clean lazy 
 evaluation code. after all, this is a hack.

 still, i think that such a library worth at least some work.

 as for "is my code/approach is good enough", i know only two 
 answers.
 1. yes, 'cause it works.
 2. no, 'cause it doesn't work.
 so if your code works, it is good. ;-)

 i mean that such hacks will be somewhat ugly anyway, so just 
 write a brief explanation in comments and go on.

 sorry, it is probably not what you wanted to hear... ;-)
Oh no thanks ;-) I came here specially to see if there is some well known technique that I didn't hear about (I searched allot before posting here). If there is no such technique than it is just more interesting to explore ! Thanks all for your answers ! I thinks I'll continue exploring the lazy evaluation path and keep looking if there is a cleaner way to do it. I'll specifically try to adapt lazy evaluation to ndsilces and see if I can have tangible results with benchmarks (by the way is there any good benchmarking lib like the #[bench] in rust that I can use ?) and study mir like it was suggested by Seb. I'll be very happy if I could contribute something useful for the D community :)
Jul 23 2016
parent ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 23:36:40 UTC, Etranger wrote:
 is there any good benchmarking lib like the #[bench] in rust 
 that I can use ?)
dunno, i'm usually just using std.datetime.benchmark.
Jul 23 2016
prev sibling next sibling parent reply ag0aep6g <anonymous example.com> writes:
On 07/23/2016 01:05 PM, Etranger wrote:
 1- Is there a cleaner way to do it ? I had to use struct because I want
 every thing to happen at compile time and on the stack (without gc). And
 I had to use string mixins because template mixin does not work the way
 I tried to use it ( see the error last line).
To avoid the string mixin, you can let VecExpression take an alias of the mixin template (Vec_impl/VecSum_impl) and the list of arguments: ---- struct VecExpression(alias mixinTemplate, mixinArgs ...) { mixin mixinTemplate!mixinArgs; VecSum!(typeof(this), VecExpression!RHS) opBinary (string op, RHS ...)(ref VecExpression!RHS rhs) { /* ... */ } } /* ... */ alias Vec(int n) = VecExpression!(Vec_impl, n); /* ... */ alias VecSum(E1, E2) = VecExpression!(VecSum_impl, E1, E2); ---- Instead of mixing the fields into VecExpression, you could mix opBinary into distinct Vec/VecSum structs: ---- mixin template opBinaryMixin() { VecSum!(typeof(this), RHS) opBinary(string op, RHS)(ref RHS rhs) { static if (op == "+") return typeof(return)(&this, &rhs); } } struct Vec(int n) { double[n] elems; /* ... */ mixin opBinaryMixin!(); } struct VecSum(E1, E2) { E1 * e1; E2 * e2; /* ... */ mixin opBinaryMixin!(); } ---- A bit of type strictness is lost here, since opBinary accepts anything, not just Vec/VecSum. If that strictness is needed, you could check specifically for Vec/VecSum, or maybe mix in a little identifier along with opBinary and check for that. You can also try std.typecons.scoped [1] to put classes on the stack. That would get around any kind of mixin. [1] https://dlang.org/phobos/std_typecons.html#.scoped
Jul 23 2016
parent Etranger <nonvalidemail nowhere.com> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 23:55:44 UTC, ag0aep6g wrote:
 On 07/23/2016 01:05 PM, Etranger wrote:
 [...]
To avoid the string mixin, you can let VecExpression take an alias of the mixin template (Vec_impl/VecSum_impl) and the list of arguments: [...]
Thanks ! that's way much cleaner and the type strictness loss is not a problem since it is what I want.
Jul 26 2016
prev sibling parent reply Ilya Yaroshenko <ilyayaroshenko gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 11:05:57 UTC, Etranger wrote:

 1- Is there a cleaner way to do it ? I had to use struct 
 because I want every thing to happen at compile time and on the 
 stack (without gc). And I had to use string mixins because 
 template mixin does not work the way I tried to use it ( see 
 the error last line).
Yes, but it is more complicated in terms of multidimensional and generic abstraction. First we need to finish and test general matrix multiplication [2].
 2- Is there a safer way to do it (without using pointers) ?
Yes, but it is slower than pointers. See Internal Binary Representation for Slice structure [1]. Mir's BLAS will use pointers.
 3- Do you think I'll hit a wall with this approach ?
No idea. In the same time I think that C++ approach is not flexible as we can build for D. Currently we need std.algorithm analog for multidimensional case. It would be more flexible than expression templates. But it requires more complex architecture analysis.
 4- Do you known any D libs that uses expression template for 
 linear algebra ?
I don't know. ndslice provides operations like `a[] += b` [1]. I just opened a PR to optimise them using SIMD instructions [4]. Mir BLAS will have more low level API for matrix multiplication then Eigen. See PR for gemm [2]. Expression like API can be build on top of Mir's BLAS.
 I'll be very happy if I could contribute something useful for 
 the D community :)
That would be great! See Mir's issues [3]. Feel free to open new one and start a discussion or open PR. Mir requires a lot of benchmarks, for example versus Eigen. Just Eigen benchmark of Level 3 BLAS functionality (like matrix multiplication) with proper CSV console output would very helpful. See current charts [5] and [6] [1] http://dlang.org/phobos/std_experimental_ndslice_slice.html#.Slice [2] https://github.com/libmir/mir/pull/255 [3] https://github.com/libmir/mir/issues [4] https://github.com/dlang/phobos/pull/4647 [5] https://s3.amazonaws.com/media-p.slid.es/uploads/546207/images/2854632/Untitled_2.004.png [6] https://s3.amazonaws.com/media-p.slid.es/uploads/546207/images/2854640/Untitled_2.006.png Best regards, Ilya
Jul 24 2016
parent reply Etranger <nonvalidemail nowhere.com> writes:
On Sunday, 24 July 2016 at 10:53:41 UTC, Ilya Yaroshenko wrote:
 On Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 11:05:57 UTC, Etranger wrote:

 [...]
Yes, but it is more complicated in terms of multidimensional and generic abstraction. First we need to finish and test general matrix multiplication [2]. [...]
Thanks allot for your suggestions. I started looking into the ndslice and mir code. For me it seems that there is an urgent need to have a better benchmarking (like rust bench or google benchmark framework for cpp) framework than what is available. I can may be look into it. I'll have time 2 months from now as I'm getting married in 2 weeks :)
Jul 26 2016
parent Ilya Yaroshenko <ilyayaroshenko gmail.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 26 July 2016 at 10:35:12 UTC, Etranger wrote:
 I'll have time 2 months from now as I'm getting married in 2 
 weeks :)
Congratulations!
Jul 26 2016