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digitalmars.D.learn - Enumerating structs?

reply Heywood Floyd <soul8o8 gmail.com> writes:
Hello!


I have some structs

  struct A { int a; }
  struct B { int b, c; }

and I'd like to be able to enumerate them (preferrably as integers) based on
their names. I've no idea how this would look, but
some pseudo code that would use this feature:

  // pseudo
  int type = stream.read!int();
  switch(type){
    case A.enumof:
      auto data = stream.read!A();
      // ...
    break;
    case B.enumof:
      // ...
    break;
    // ...

The idea here is to enable stuff like static if's etc and to enforce the
connection between the struct and the enumeration. Right now
I have a separate enums, like so:

  enum {A_ENUM = 1, B_ENUM = 2};
  // ...
    case A_ENUM:
       auto data = stream.read!A();
       // ...
    break;
  //...

But this means the idea that struct A has the enumeration "1" is only by
convention. So when I, for instance, refactor struct A to "C",
all code still compiles. It would be cool if it didn't, somehow. With this
small example it's of course not a problem, but for larger
more complex code perhaps.

A naive idea I had was to let each struct have an enum:

  struct A{
    enum TYPE_ENUM = 1;
    int a;
  }

That would be refactor-friendly and be a strong connection, but then there's no
guarantee two structs don't have the same enum,
of course. Another idea was to maybe use mixin to somehow construct the enum
declaration:

  mixin enumByType!(A,B);

That could generate code like:

  enum {A_ENUM = 1, ...}

and then couple it with a

   // ...
   case typeEnumFor!A():
       //...
   break;
   // ...

but now it's starting to maybe feel a bit overkill?
Is there an easier/correct/other way?

-

I usually end up feeling like this a lot with D, I just realized. It's like,
yes, with mixins I can more or less do anything, but where
does one stop? You know what I mean? I like it though. Mixin-paralysis : )


/HF
Jan 03 2012
parent reply =?utf-8?Q?Simen_Kj=C3=A6r=C3=A5s?= <simen.kjaras gmail.com> writes:
On Tue, 03 Jan 2012 16:35:29 +0100, Heywood Floyd <soul8o8 gmail.com>  
wrote:

 Hello!


 I have some structs

   struct A { int a; }
   struct B { int b, c; }

 and I'd like to be able to enumerate them (preferrably as integers)  
 based on their names. I've no idea how this would look, but
 some pseudo code that would use this feature:

   // pseudo
   int type = stream.read!int();
   switch(type){
     case A.enumof:
       auto data = stream.read!A();
       // ...
     break;
     case B.enumof:
       // ...
     break;
     // ...

 The idea here is to enable stuff like static if's etc and to enforce the  
 connection between the struct and the enumeration. Right now
 I have a separate enums, like so:

   enum {A_ENUM = 1, B_ENUM = 2};
   // ...
     case A_ENUM:
        auto data = stream.read!A();
        // ...
     break;
   //...

 But this means the idea that struct A has the enumeration "1" is only by  
 convention. So when I, for instance, refactor struct A to "C",
 all code still compiles. It would be cool if it didn't, somehow. With  
 this small example it's of course not a problem, but for larger
 more complex code perhaps.

 A naive idea I had was to let each struct have an enum:

   struct A{
     enum TYPE_ENUM = 1;
     int a;
   }

 That would be refactor-friendly and be a strong connection, but then  
 there's no guarantee two structs don't have the same enum,
 of course. Another idea was to maybe use mixin to somehow construct the  
 enum declaration:

   mixin enumByType!(A,B);

 That could generate code like:

   enum {A_ENUM = 1, ...}

 and then couple it with a

    // ...
    case typeEnumFor!A():
        //...
    break;
    // ...

 but now it's starting to maybe feel a bit overkill?
 Is there an easier/correct/other way?

 -

 I usually end up feeling like this a lot with D, I just realized. It's  
 like, yes, with mixins I can more or less do anything, but where
 does one stop? You know what I mean? I like it though. Mixin-paralysis :)

Yeah, D feels like that to me too, sometimes. Anyways, for your question - would using the struct name be good enough? They're easy to get hold of and usable in switch statements. If not, how about this: import std.typetuple; struct TypeEnum( T... ) { static pure nothrow property int value( U )( ) { static assert ( staticIndexOf!( U, T ) != -1 ); return staticIndexOf!( U, T ); } } struct A {} struct B {} void main( ) { alias TypeEnum!(A, B) types; assert( types.value!A == 0 ); assert( types.value!B == 1 ); }
Jan 03 2012
parent Heywood Floyd <soul8o8 gmail.com> writes:
 Yeah, D feels like that to me too, sometimes. Anyways, for your question -
 would using the struct name be good enough? They're easy to get hold of
 and usable in switch statements.

 If not, how about this:


 import std.typetuple;

 struct TypeEnum( T... ) {
     static pure nothrow  property
     int value( U )( ) {
         static assert ( staticIndexOf!( U, T ) != -1 );
         return staticIndexOf!( U, T );
     }
 }

 struct A {}
 struct B {}

 void main( ) {
     alias TypeEnum!(A, B) types;

     assert( types.value!A == 0 );
     assert( types.value!B == 1 );
 }

Ha, yes, that looks quite nice! Thanks! /HF
Jan 04 2012