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digitalmars.D - dlang.org redesign n+1

reply "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
dlang.org site. I basically took the 
`do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

http://dlang.skoppe.eu

It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I 
needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc 
ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax highlighting 
- nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, 
tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about 
all the other pages.

BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In 
fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. I 
don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't dmd 
always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that stuff? I 
suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they are, 
except me :)
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent reply =?UTF-8?B?QWxpIMOHZWhyZWxp?= <acehreli yahoo.com> writes:
On 01/21/2015 06:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:

 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the dlang.org
 site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu
I love it! I seriously think that this kind of modern look will help with language adoption a lot. Ali
Jan 21 2015
parent reply =?UTF-8?B?QWxpIMOHZWhyZWxp?= <acehreli yahoo.com> writes:
On 01/21/2015 07:00 AM, Ali Çehreli wrote:
 On 01/21/2015 06:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:

  > Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the dlang.org
  > site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:
  >
  > http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 I love it!
While you're at it, can you fix the following as well? :p http://ddili.org/ders/d.en/ Kidding... I will adopt whatever you are doing for dlang.org. Ali
Jan 21 2015
parent Iain Buclaw via Digitalmars-d <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> writes:
On 21 Jan 2015 16:51, "Ali =C3=87ehreli" <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> wrot=
e:
 On 01/21/2015 07:00 AM, Ali =C3=87ehreli wrote:
 On 01/21/2015 06:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:

  > Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the
dlang.org
  > site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach=
:
  >
  > http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 I love it!
While you're at it, can you fix the following as well? :p http://ddili.org/ders/d.en/
Don't forget http://gdcproject.org too. :o) Iain
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Xinok" <xinok live.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu
This gets a big thumbs up from me. The layout is great, everything flows nicely, and a good blend of colors with the unofficial "D red". The only issue is that some elements aren't laid out correctly in Firefox.
Jan 21 2015
parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 15:08:02 UTC, Xinok wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu
This gets a big thumbs up from me. The layout is great, everything flows nicely, and a good blend of colors with the unofficial "D red". The only issue is that some elements aren't laid out correctly in Firefox.
Should be misplaced padding/margin somewhere.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp progtools.org> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I 
 needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc 
 ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, 
 tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about 
 all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In 
 fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. I 
 don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't dmd 
 always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that stuff? 
 I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they are, 
 except me :)
I love the overall design. Is there a way to change the sections layout to avoid too much PgDn? -- Paulo
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent Mike Parker <aldacron gmail.com> writes:
On 1/21/2015 11:46 PM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the dlang.org
 site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu
A giant +1. This is the direction the site should be going in.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "wobbles" <grogan.colin gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I 
 needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc 
 ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, 
 tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about 
 all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In 
 fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. I 
 don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't dmd 
 always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that stuff? 
 I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they are, 
 except me :)
I really like. How much work would be involved in keeping this look and feel over the rest of the site do you think?
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent "wobbles" <grogan.colin gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 15:25:53 UTC, wobbles wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones 
 I needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So 
 ddoc ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some 
 macro's, tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to 
 worry about all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. 
 In fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. 
 I don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't 
 dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that 
 stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or 
 they are, except me :)
I really like. How much work would be involved in keeping this look and feel over the rest of the site do you think?
like it*. Also, while we're on the subject, what ever happened with the redesign that was started last year?
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 15:25:53 UTC, wobbles wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones 
 I needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So 
 ddoc ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some 
 macro's, tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to 
 worry about all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. 
 In fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. 
 I don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't 
 dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that 
 stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or 
 they are, except me :)
I really like. How much work would be involved in keeping this look and feel over the rest of the site do you think?
Took me around 14 hours to get this far. Probably still 80% needs to be done.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I 
 needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc 
 ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, 
 tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about 
 all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In 
 fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. I 
 don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't dmd 
 always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that stuff? 
 I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they are, 
 except me :)
Good start. A few points: 1. The font is too big (see also 2.). 2. A lot of space is wasted. To fix this, maybe it would help to lay it out in "tiles" (two or three items in one row, cf http://foundation.zurb.com/). As it is now, the three major points Convenience, Power and Efficiency are too far apart, there's too much scrolling involved (which users hate). All the important information should be visible at once. 3. No need to use so much space for "The D Programming Language", especially since we don't have a fancy graphic to fill that space (why should we). 4. Tools like DUB etc. should be bundled as on the Foundation homepage under something like "Build products, apps and services"
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent reply "aldanor" <i.s.smirnov gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 15:35:59 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones 
 I needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So 
 ddoc ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some 
 macro's, tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to 
 worry about all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. 
 In fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. 
 I don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't 
 dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that 
 stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or 
 they are, except me :)
Good start. A few points: 1. The font is too big (see also 2.). 2. A lot of space is wasted. To fix this, maybe it would help to lay it out in "tiles" (two or three items in one row, cf http://foundation.zurb.com/). As it is now, the three major points Convenience, Power and Efficiency are too far apart, there's too much scrolling involved (which users hate). All the important information should be visible at once. 3. No need to use so much space for "The D Programming Language", especially since we don't have a fancy graphic to fill that space (why should we). 4. Tools like DUB etc. should be bundled as on the Foundation homepage under something like "Build products, apps and services"
Good work in the right direction!.. and now for some bikeshedding: Agreed with Chris on (1), (2), (3), plus: (4) Not mobile-ready / not responsive. Try resizing horizontally and see what happens. This is related to (2) and could be solved by using a proper grid framework. (5) Use a better sans serif font (with a fallback to browser default sans family), it actually matters a lot :) Like Fira Sans, Helvetica Neue or something like that. Could use a better monospaced font as well (6) Hover-on/-off effects (like in the menu above) are usually frowned upon since they won't work on mobile devices as you expect. It's sometimes better to just have plain properly styled links. (7) The search bar seems misplaced
Jan 21 2015
parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 16:22:08 UTC, aldanor wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 15:35:59 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan 
 Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones 
 I needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So 
 ddoc ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some 
 macro's, tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to 
 worry about all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. 
 In fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. 
 I don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't 
 dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that 
 stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or 
 they are, except me :)
Good start. A few points: 1. The font is too big (see also 2.). 2. A lot of space is wasted. To fix this, maybe it would help to lay it out in "tiles" (two or three items in one row, cf http://foundation.zurb.com/). As it is now, the three major points Convenience, Power and Efficiency are too far apart, there's too much scrolling involved (which users hate). All the important information should be visible at once. 3. No need to use so much space for "The D Programming Language", especially since we don't have a fancy graphic to fill that space (why should we). 4. Tools like DUB etc. should be bundled as on the Foundation homepage under something like "Build products, apps and services"
Good work in the right direction!.. and now for some bikeshedding: Agreed with Chris on (1), (2), (3), plus: (4) Not mobile-ready / not responsive. Try resizing horizontally and see what happens. This is related to (2) and could be solved by using a proper grid framework. (5) Use a better sans serif font (with a fallback to browser default sans family), it actually matters a lot :) Like Fira Sans, Helvetica Neue or something like that. Could use a better monospaced font as well (6) Hover-on/-off effects (like in the menu above) are usually frowned upon since they won't work on mobile devices as you expect. It's sometimes better to just have plain properly styled links. (7) The search bar seems misplaced
I am using a grid framework (purecss). And I resize all the time. What browser are you using? Suggestions for the fonts are welcome. I just took the default and never looked back.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent reply "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 15:35:59 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones 
 I needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So 
 ddoc ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some 
 macro's, tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to 
 worry about all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. 
 In fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. 
 I don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't 
 dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that 
 stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or 
 they are, except me :)
Good start. A few points: 1. The font is too big (see also 2.). 2. A lot of space is wasted. To fix this, maybe it would help to lay it out in "tiles" (two or three items in one row, cf http://foundation.zurb.com/). As it is now, the three major points Convenience, Power and Efficiency are too far apart, there's too much scrolling involved (which users hate). All the important information should be visible at once. 3. No need to use so much space for "The D Programming Language", especially since we don't have a fancy graphic to fill that space (why should we). 4. Tools like DUB etc. should be bundled as on the Foundation homepage under something like "Build products, apps and services"
Yeah, alot of stuff needs some fine-tuning. Specially the fonts. Content is just copy-n-paste, could definitely use some marketing.
Jan 21 2015
parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 1/21/15 8:44 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Yeah, alot of stuff needs some fine-tuning. Specially the fonts.
Better fonts would be awesome, these (and the existing ones) are just... bare.
 Content is just copy-n-paste, could definitely use some marketing.
No worries about content for now I'd say. Andrei
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "MattCoder" <stop spam.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu
Well like everyone else said, this is awesome. I don't know if this is problem in my browser (I'm using FF 34.0), but some boxes seems smaller than should be, example: http://i.imgur.com/Ge1ljck.png Matheus.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "eles" <eles eles.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC,

Impressive. Make the top menu larger on phone, pls. Otherwise, 
amazing.
Jan 21 2015
parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 16:15:21 UTC, eles wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC,

 Impressive. Make the top menu larger on phone, pls. Otherwise, 
 amazing.
The menu is not working indeed. It needs to default to a sliding menu on phones.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 1/21/15 6:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the dlang.org
 site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language reference (see
 Docs menu-item) is working.
This is awesome, and something I'd get behind. Here's a little feedback coming from a self-admitted dilettante: * On my laptop it looks like this: http://imgur.com/v8TC1xq. I'm seeing the red menu at the top, the gray sparse box, and also an odd fragment of the next page which has a different background, a title, and a fragment of code snippet. The way I look at it is either you go balls-out with the sparse gray page and make it occupy the entire viewport, or you make it smaller to allow me to get to some content. As things are I can't stop wondering: "Why did they waste all that space so I can't see stuff?" * The red band at the top has the logo misaligned vertically. * The font in the menus at the top are disproportionally small compared to the red band's thickness. Possibilities are to increase the fonts, reduce the band and the logo thickness, or make the logo go out of the bound in some stylish/asymmetric manner. * The search box flushes left with the rest of the menu. Flush right instead? * The design clarifies that some of the homepage content is awful, which is good :o) * I don't care much about the dark gray bands alternating with the light gray snippets. Especially the "conference websites" one makes it painfully clear the padding top and bottom are too large. To be frank they were poorly styled in the original homepage. * The bottom red strip is too thick, font is too large, and the top padding is larger than bottom padding. There's that awful old legal notice that's not on the homepage. How old is your content? * Generally I feel I must scroll too much through too little (and occasionally crappy - not your fault) content on the homepage. There's just so much "air". But that might be part of the page's very look and feel, so if people like it no problem. * Where's twitter? * Page doesn't seem to load on mobile at all. * Clicking on "Overview" while I'm on the homepage does nothing. But there's no visual indication I'm already on "Overview". Also clicking on "Overview" or the logo seem to do the same thing. Oh, wait, not all menus are meant to work - take that back. * Clicking on "Docs" takes me to spec.html. That looks nice except the "Download" menu item is rendered in almost invisible white. * There's no accordion on "Language Reference" which makes for a really tall menu, sometimes even longer than the content itself. I find that hard to navigate. Statistically nobody will get to "Visual D" and "Community" :o). * "Preview new Layout" is too small. * Top-level menu entries without submenus, of which there's only one ("Visual D") are rendered in an awkward black color that doesn't do much for me. * The top and bottom spacing of submenus are not equal. * The "Improve this page" and "page wiki" are not rendered properly. * Layout is jerky as I reduce the width of the page: sometimes the right/left margins are really wide, even on thin viewports, thus wasting already precious space, then they get thin, then they get wide again, etc.
 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a couple of
 hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I needed to change.
 After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc ain't that bad. It is just
 that I didn't have syntax highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I
 hate that.
Yah, some editor support for ddoc would go a very long way.
 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, tweak
 the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about all the other
 pages.
Love that.
 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In fact, I
 could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. Looking into
 posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all misconfigured, and I bet I am
 supposed to set those manually. I don't get it, doesn't everything has
 its own place? Isn't dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd
 and that stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they
 are, except me :)
Glad to hear that. I don't use a Windows machine so it's good things work for you. FWIW we build the actual website on Posix; I'm not sure how much win32.mak does, but posix.mak builds both the release and prerelease libraries using the right compilers etc. You should have no trouble building dlang.org on linux following the instructions at https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/dlang.org/blob/master/CONTRIBUTING.md. The rationale for NOT using /usr/bin/dmd etc. is that oftentimes the docs use specific features of the compiler, which means you need to build a specific library docs with the same compiler version. For the site proper we always use the development version of dmd (which by default we assume is ../dmd/src/dmd) so people can change the compiler and the docs in tandem. Once you get that in place things should work smoothly. Andrei
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 16:30:37 UTC, Andrei 
Alexandrescu wrote:
 This is awesome, and something I'd get behind. Here's a little 
 feedback coming from a self-admitted dilettante:

 * On my laptop it looks like this: http://imgur.com/v8TC1xq. 
 I'm seeing the red menu at the top, the gray sparse box, and 
 also an odd fragment of the next page which has a different 
 background, a title, and a fragment of code snippet. The way I 
 look at it is either you go balls-out with the sparse gray page 
 and make it occupy the entire viewport, or you make it smaller 
 to allow me to get to some content. As things are I can't stop 
 wondering: "Why did they waste all that space so I can't see 
 stuff?"

 (...)

 * Generally I feel I must scroll too much through too little 
 (and occasionally crappy - not your fault) content on the 
 homepage. There's just so much "air". But that might be part of 
 the page's very look and feel, so if people like it no problem.
Agreed. Again, it is a proof-of-concept.
 * Page doesn't seem to load on mobile at all.
Hmm, that is odd. Some other people said the same thing. Loads fine on mine though...
 * Clicking on "Overview" while I'm on the homepage does 
 nothing. But there's no visual indication I'm already on 
 "Overview". Also clicking on "Overview" or the logo seem to do 
 the same thing. Oh, wait, not all menus are meant to work - 
 take that back.
There are no navigational helpers indeed. Didn't know how to get the current page from within ddoc to set css stuff to highlight things etc.
 * There's no accordion on "Language Reference" which makes for 
 a really tall menu, sometimes even longer than the content 
 itself. I find that hard to navigate. Statistically nobody will 
 get to "Visual D" and "Community" :o).
Haha. There are some other pages as well that nobody gets to read in full.
 * Layout is jerky as I reduce the width of the page: sometimes 
 the right/left margins are really wide, even on thin viewports, 
 thus wasting already precious space, then they get thin, then 
 they get wide again, etc.
There is a mismatch between some responsive stuff. Saw it as well. It's just about playing with thresholds, and alot of tweaking.
 You should have no trouble building dlang.org on linux 
 following the instructions at 
 https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/dlang.org/blob/master/CONTRIBUTING.md.
Will look into it.
 The rationale for NOT using /usr/bin/dmd etc. is that 
 oftentimes the docs use specific features of the compiler, 
 which means you need to build a specific library docs with the 
 same compiler version. For the site proper we always use the 
 development version of dmd (which by default we assume is 
 ../dmd/src/dmd) so people can change the compiler and the docs 
 in tandem. Once you get that in place things should work 
 smoothly.
Yeah, but where can I get /dmd/src/dmd? Do I need to fork the dmd source code?
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent reply "aldanor" <i.s.smirnov gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:10:09 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 16:30:37 UTC, Andrei 
 Alexandrescu wrote:
 This is awesome, and something I'd get behind. Here's a little 
 feedback coming from a self-admitted dilettante:

 * On my laptop it looks like this: http://imgur.com/v8TC1xq. 
 I'm seeing the red menu at the top, the gray sparse box, and 
 also an odd fragment of the next page which has a different 
 background, a title, and a fragment of code snippet. The way I 
 look at it is either you go balls-out with the sparse gray 
 page and make it occupy the entire viewport, or you make it 
 smaller to allow me to get to some content. As things are I 
 can't stop wondering: "Why did they waste all that space so I 
 can't see stuff?"

 (...)

 * Generally I feel I must scroll too much through too little 
 (and occasionally crappy - not your fault) content on the 
 homepage. There's just so much "air". But that might be part 
 of the page's very look and feel, so if people like it no 
 problem.
Agreed. Again, it is a proof-of-concept.
 * Page doesn't seem to load on mobile at all.
Hmm, that is odd. Some other people said the same thing. Loads fine on mine though...
 * Clicking on "Overview" while I'm on the homepage does 
 nothing. But there's no visual indication I'm already on 
 "Overview". Also clicking on "Overview" or the logo seem to do 
 the same thing. Oh, wait, not all menus are meant to work - 
 take that back.
There are no navigational helpers indeed. Didn't know how to get the current page from within ddoc to set css stuff to highlight things etc.
 * There's no accordion on "Language Reference" which makes for 
 a really tall menu, sometimes even longer than the content 
 itself. I find that hard to navigate. Statistically nobody 
 will get to "Visual D" and "Community" :o).
Haha. There are some other pages as well that nobody gets to read in full.
 * Layout is jerky as I reduce the width of the page: sometimes 
 the right/left margins are really wide, even on thin 
 viewports, thus wasting already precious space, then they get 
 thin, then they get wide again, etc.
There is a mismatch between some responsive stuff. Saw it as well. It's just about playing with thresholds, and alot of tweaking.
 You should have no trouble building dlang.org on linux 
 following the instructions at 
 https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/dlang.org/blob/master/CONTRIBUTING.md.
Will look into it.
 The rationale for NOT using /usr/bin/dmd etc. is that 
 oftentimes the docs use specific features of the compiler, 
 which means you need to build a specific library docs with the 
 same compiler version. For the site proper we always use the 
 development version of dmd (which by default we assume is 
 ../dmd/src/dmd) so people can change the compiler and the docs 
 in tandem. Once you get that in place things should work 
 smoothly.
Yeah, but where can I get /dmd/src/dmd? Do I need to fork the dmd source code?
Sebastian, could please you publish your fork somewhere so we could take a closer look and/or fork/destroy it? It would also be easier to make specific suggestions
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:12:22 UTC, aldanor wrote:
 Sebastian, could please you publish your fork somewhere so we 
 could take a closer look and/or fork/destroy it? It would also 
 be easier to make specific suggestions
https://github.com/skoppe/dlang.org I case you only want to make changes to the css, you can checkout the `compiled` branch and just make changes to the css/styles.css
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent "aldanor" <i.s.smirnov gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:16:52 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:12:22 UTC, aldanor wrote:
 Sebastian, could please you publish your fork somewhere so we 
 could take a closer look and/or fork/destroy it? It would also 
 be easier to make specific suggestions
https://github.com/skoppe/dlang.org I case you only want to make changes to the css, you can checkout the `compiled` branch and just make changes to the css/styles.css
Great stuff, thanks a mil. I'll try to poke around tonight and see how to address some of the issues mentioned here
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent reply "Kiith-Sa" <kiithsacmp gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:16:52 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:12:22 UTC, aldanor wrote:
 Sebastian, could please you publish your fork somewhere so we 
 could take a closer look and/or fork/destroy it? It would also 
 be easier to make specific suggestions
https://github.com/skoppe/dlang.org I case you only want to make changes to the css, you can checkout the `compiled` branch and just make changes to the css/styles.css
Too much wasted space on wide screens (right half of the screen is almost empty) Suggested improvement: http://imgur.com/a/zgSJa
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent "MattCoder" <stop spam.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:52:56 UTC, Kiith-Sa wrote:
 Suggested improvement:

 http://imgur.com/a/zgSJa
Or: http://i.imgur.com/ciSn8vM.png Matheus.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent reply "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:52:56 UTC, Kiith-Sa wrote:
 Suggested improvement:

 http://imgur.com/a/zgSJa
Can't open link.
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "Kiith-Sa" <kiithsacmp gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 01:34:01 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:52:56 UTC, Kiith-Sa wrote:
 Suggested improvement:

 http://imgur.com/a/zgSJa
Can't open link.
Direct image links: current: http://i.imgur.com/5IN3Nui.png better: http://i.imgur.com/CdgKxhM.png (this will be even better for the cases where there are multiple text blocks besides a code block) - it both helps save horizontal space and slightly decreases the need for scrolling.
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 01:37:25 UTC, Kiith-Sa wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 01:34:01 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:52:56 UTC, Kiith-Sa wrote:
 Suggested improvement:

 http://imgur.com/a/zgSJa
Can't open link.
Direct image links: current: http://i.imgur.com/5IN3Nui.png better: http://i.imgur.com/CdgKxhM.png
On my pc with chrome it looks like the 2nd one. There is probably an offensive margin/padding somewhere.
Jan 22 2015
parent "CraigDillabaugh" <craig.dillabaugh gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 13:06:40 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 01:37:25 UTC, Kiith-Sa wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 01:34:01 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:52:56 UTC, Kiith-Sa wrote:
 Suggested improvement:

 http://imgur.com/a/zgSJa
Can't open link.
Direct image links: current: http://i.imgur.com/5IN3Nui.png better: http://i.imgur.com/CdgKxhM.png
On my pc with chrome it looks like the 2nd one. There is probably an offensive margin/padding somewhere.
For the code examples could you do something with 'tabs' (or whatever the cool kids call those nowadays) so that all three appear on screen at once, this is more dense but loses none of the content. And not even a genius can read three different code examples at once anyway.: ie. +-------------+ +------------+ +-------------+ | Convenience | | Power | | Efficiency | | blah, blah | | blah,blah | | blah, blah | +-------------+ +------------+ +-------------+ +--------------------------------------------------+ | Shows convenient code exmple when 'convenience' | | is the selection. | | Shows power code when 'power' is selected. | | Shows efficient code when that is selected | +--------------------------------------------------+ I am sure you can do stuff like that with modern JavaScript.
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 1/21/15 9:10 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Yeah, but where can I get /dmd/src/dmd? Do I need to fork the dmd source
 code?
Yah, it's all at https://github.com/D-Programming-Language/dlang.org/blob/master/CONTRIBUTING.md - step by step instructions that take you from nothing to where you want to me. -- Andrei
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Robert burner Schadek" <rburners gmail.com> writes:
"shut up and take my money" love it
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "anonymous" <anonymous example.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu
I must have been taking crazy pills, because everyone else seems to love it, but I don't like the homepage. I have to scroll down way too much to actually see some content. Also, I can't make sense of the order of things. I know this is what-everybody-else-is-doing, and I don't like on other sites either. I dig the red menu bar though (except for the hover effect). And 'Docs' looks nice, too.
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "H. S. Teoh via Digitalmars-d" <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> writes:
On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 05:27:09PM +0000, anonymous via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the dlang.org
site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

http://dlang.skoppe.eu
I must have been taking crazy pills, because everyone else seems to love it, but I don't like the homepage. I have to scroll down way too much to actually see some content. Also, I can't make sense of the order of things. I know this is what-everybody-else-is-doing, and I don't like on other sites either.
[...] +1. I didn't like it either. But then again, the majority of people rarely agree with me, so I didn't say anything. But obviously I'm not alone in disliking this spaced-out layout. T -- Живёшь только однажды.
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent reply "MattCoder" <stop spam.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:34:46 UTC, H. S. Teoh via 
Digitalmars-d wrote:
z
 +1. I didn't like it either. But then again, the majority of 
 people
 rarely agree with me, so I didn't say anything. But obviously 
 I'm not
 alone in disliking this spaced-out layout.
Well, of course it needs some polishing, for example: I think the top menu should be visible on screen while you scroll down, because imagine that you are at bottom of the page and want to go somewhere else (Forums, Documentation etc). There are some spaces not filled. Yes the font size needs a scale up. About the layout (Vertical Wall Text), I think they became popular because the mobile, you know those 7" or 8" size screens, then you can read the site like an ebook or maybe because the technical side, like partial loading. Matheus.
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent "anonymous" <anonymous example.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:52:07 UTC, MattCoder wrote:
 Well, of course it needs some polishing, for example: I think 
 the top menu should be visible on screen while you scroll down, 
 because imagine that you are at bottom of the page and want to 
 go somewhere else (Forums, Documentation etc).
Actually, I wouldn't like that. I have more often been annoyed by menues I don't need than by having to scroll up. It may be nice for the 'Docs' menu on the left. Because there it's more likely that one tries different pages when searching for something. That menu also takes up horizontal space, which I find more tolerable on the big screen. [...]
 Yes the font size needs a scale up.
It's at 100% of the user/browser-defined size, isn't it? That's fine with me. On the the current site the font is actually smaller than what I set in the browser. I'm not a fan of that.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent reply "H. S. Teoh via Digitalmars-d" <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> writes:
On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 05:52:06PM +0000, MattCoder via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:34:46 UTC, H. S. Teoh via Digitalmars-d
 wrote:
 z
+1. I didn't like it either. But then again, the majority of people
rarely agree with me, so I didn't say anything. But obviously I'm not
alone in disliking this spaced-out layout.
Well, of course it needs some polishing, for example: I think the top menu should be visible on screen while you scroll down, because imagine that you are at bottom of the page and want to go somewhere else (Forums, Documentation etc).
I'm not talking about polishing. I'm talking about the design itself. (Obviously, the following is just my personal opinion, so please don't take it personally.) Let's start at the top. First, there's too much empty space. The entire top red band wastes a huge amount of screen real estate while providing only 6 links and a search bar that's (1) way too tall and (2) not wide enough for a meaningful (i.e. non-trivial) query. This giant red band is present on every page, effectively reducing the height of the browser window by 20% for no good reason. I mean, it could be a *single line* at the top of the page, what's the point of squatting on 20% of the page filling it with empty space? Don't get me wrong, judicious use of empty space is very important in any website design. But this is overuse of empty space. Second, that ugly gray band in the middle with "The D Programming Language" in a font that's way too big and in-your-face. This is nothing but a reincarnation of the evil Splash Page from the 90's, where useful content is hidden behind obscure links relegated to the corners of the page while the prime real estate in the middle of the screen is an overly big splash of the marketing message that the website authors want to shove down your throat. No thanks. Let *me* decide if I'm interested in your site, I don't need you to tell me what I should be interested in. The title should be just that: a title. At the top of the page, in a prominent place if you wish, but give me the *content*! When I go to a website, I'm looking for *information*. Not ads and vacuous slogans. If I wanted ads, I'd go read a pulp magazine website or something. Or monsterjobs.com. But on the website of a *programming language*?! Ick. Third, the real content of the page begins at the bottom of the screen, with an overly large heading "C-like Syntax". Really?? The primary selling point of D is that it has C-like syntax? Wow. Not to mention, the text that follows is cut off halfway at the bottom mid-paragraph because the red bar and the gray splash screen has occupied almost all of the prime real estate on the screen, so there's not enough room for even a single paragraph of real content, but it has to spill to the next screenful. Which brings me to the next point: the page is WAY TOO LONG. Worse yet, its already overly-long length is further exacerbated by the gratuitously huge title font sizes. Too much space is wasted on titles and section headings for no good reason. And there are too many sections on the page. Nobody is going to read past the first 2 screenfuls, which, due to the wanton waste of screen space in the first screenful, has not enough space for meaningful content. When you have so much content you wish people to read, the first order of business should be to provide easy navigation so that people can *get* to the content in the first place. But, AFAICT, there is no way to jump between those overly-long sections past the first screenful. So basically, nobody is going to read that stuff. Unfortunately, that includes important information about dub, the Dconfs, TDPL, the various compilers, etc.. The only thing that's gonna impress people is the overly huge title and the 3 slogans that, as far as they can tell, are unsubstantiated (since the substantiation is too far down the page for them to care to read). They will have no idea about the Dconfs, TDPL, what compilers are available, etc.. I.e., things that are actually pertinent to *programmers*, who are our target audience. Or are we targeting marketing people as our primary audience now, and wish to impress them how sleek our website design is? IMO, things like (1) code examples, (2) language features, (3) language and standard library docs, (4) compilers, (5) IDE support, are what programmers care about. These things therefore should be front and center. Programmers don't really care about the name of the language -- unless you first convince them they should, by showing them the preceding pieces of information first. The overly prominent download link is misplaced, because before you present pertinent info to the programmer, why would he want to download your language in the first place? Why should he care for *your* language above the hundreds and thousands of others out there? The download link should be somewhere on the first page, in an easy-to-find place, for when he decides "OK this looks interesting, now where can I download it and give it a try?". But it shouldn't be front and center. Instead, what should be front and center is the stuff that's pertinent to the programmers (i.e., our target audience). The code. The language features. The nice syntax. Why they should care about this language. Good navigation is essential here, because he may not be convinced by the first glance, and may decide to look at the tutorials or docs first. Those links should be in a prominent place so that he can find them easily. And it should be simple (i.e. one click) to navigate between any given tutorial page, any documentation page, and the download page (for when he has seen enough to decide he wants to give it a try). It should be easy to tell at a glance where on the website he is. A collapsible navigation bar helps a lot here. And on each page, the most representative code examples or features should be at the top, where it is visible without scrolling down, 'cos most people won't bother to scroll down (unless you've given them reasons compelling enough to catch their interest). Otherwise they will lose interest and go back to watching YouTube or something. At least I know that if this were what the D website looked like back when I first found D, I would've closed the tab and moved on instantly. My first reaction would have been: OK, so this is "THE D PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE" (the font is so big!). Obviously the creators want me to care, but why should I care? I don't see any code examples (and no obvious links to some, either). No feature list (also no obvious links to that). Only 3 unsubstantiated (AFAICT) slogans. Sounds like some dreaded marketing person designed this ugly page. (Where are my fellow programmers?!) And obviously they want me to download their language (download link front and center). But since they haven't told me anything interesting about their language, why should I? All they have is this red and gray space. If their language is as vacuous as this page, I don't think I'd be interested. *yawn* Yeah, I think I'm gonna go back to YouTube and watch cute baby elephant videos instead. Comparing this page with the current dlang.org page, I think that the current dlang.org page meets more of the above expectations than this one. So I'd have to say that this design is a step back rather than forward. (At least for me.)
 There are some spaces not filled.
 
 Yes the font size needs a scale up.
Please, no. The fonts are WAY TOO BIG already.
 About the layout (Vertical Wall Text), I think they became popular
 because the mobile, you know those 7" or 8" size screens, then you can
 read the site like an ebook or maybe because the technical side, like
 partial loading.
[...] This is why I have said before, and I say again, that for mobile devices you need a different kind of layout. You cannot use that kind of layout for a PC browser. It simply doesn't translate. T -- If you want to solve a problem, you need to address its root cause, not just its symptoms. Otherwise it's like treating cancer with Tylenol...
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 1/21/15 11:55 AM, H. S. Teoh via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 This giant red band is present on
 every page, effectively reducing the height of the browser window by 20%
 for no good reason.
I'm also a fan of vertical navigation menus because today's screens have a wide aspect ratio making vertical real estate precious and horizontal real estate cheap. -- Andrei
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "Tobias Pankrath" <tobias pankrath.net> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 20:41:09 UTC, Andrei 
Alexandrescu wrote:
 On 1/21/15 11:55 AM, H. S. Teoh via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 This giant red band is present on
 every page, effectively reducing the height of the browser 
 window by 20%
 for no good reason.
I'm also a fan of vertical navigation menus because today's screens have a wide aspect ratio making vertical real estate precious and horizontal real estate cheap. -- Andrei
Onyl true if you have only one window open. I'm using a tiling WM and usually have to windows side by side. Suddenly it's the opposite.
Jan 21 2015
parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 1/21/15 3:53 PM, Tobias Pankrath wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 20:41:09 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 On 1/21/15 11:55 AM, H. S. Teoh via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 This giant red band is present on
 every page, effectively reducing the height of the browser window by 20%
 for no good reason.
I'm also a fan of vertical navigation menus because today's screens have a wide aspect ratio making vertical real estate precious and horizontal real estate cheap. -- Andrei
Onyl true if you have only one window open. I'm using a tiling WM and usually have to windows side by side. Suddenly it's the opposite.
The usual widescreen: 16:9, so 1.78x. If you divide the width by two: 8:9, i.e. 0.89x. To make it "the opposite" you'd need 5:9, i.e. use about three windows side by side. -- Andrei
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "MattCoder" <stop spam.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:57:25 UTC, H. S. Teoh via 
Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 05:52:06PM +0000, MattCoder via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:34:46 UTC, H. S. Teoh via 
 Digitalmars-d
 wrote:
 z
+1. I didn't like it either. But then again, the majority of 
people
rarely agree with me, so I didn't say anything. But obviously 
I'm not
alone in disliking this spaced-out layout.
Well, of course it needs some polishing, for example: I think the top menu should be visible on screen while you scroll down, because imagine that you are at bottom of the page and want to go somewhere else (Forums, Documentation etc).
I'm not talking about polishing. I'm talking about the design itself. (Obviously, the following is just my personal opinion, so please don't take it personally.)
Never, I don't take anything like this personally, this is a discussion board and sometimes we will agree and some don't! :)
 There are some spaces not filled.
 
 Yes the font size needs a scale up.
Please, no. The fonts are WAY TOO BIG already.
So, reading from my Galaxy Tab 7" on Horizontal I found harder to read than other sites, but this is a minor problem, it could be solved with CSS and media thing.
 This is why I have said before, and I say again, that for 
 mobile devices
 you need a different kind of layout. You cannot use that kind 
 of layout
 for a PC browser. It simply doesn't translate.
Yes, but on the technical side the partial loading will be same on mobile and desktop, but in this case if it is easy or not to do this partial loading with this layout is a purely guessing of my part, I'm not a web-developer! Matheus.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent "Phil" <phil.j.ellison gmail.com> writes:
I really don't like this style of page. I much prefer the look of 
the redesign that was proposed a while back and is floating 
around somewhere (I think there's a pull request lying around 
somewhere to get something very close to that). If I'm on a PC 
then I want to be able to see all the navigation options at a 
glance, but have to scroll forever.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent reply "Vladimir Panteleev" <vladimir thecybershadow.net> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:34:46 UTC, H. S. Teoh via 
Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 05:27:09PM +0000, anonymous via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan 
 Koppe wrote:
Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
dlang.org
site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` 
approach:

http://dlang.skoppe.eu
I must have been taking crazy pills, because everyone else seems to love it, but I don't like the homepage. I have to scroll down way too much to actually see some content. Also, I can't make sense of the order of things. I know this is what-everybody-else-is-doing, and I don't like on other sites either.
[...] +1. I didn't like it either. But then again, the majority of people rarely agree with me, so I didn't say anything. But obviously I'm not alone in disliking this spaced-out layout.
I don't like the front page either, but the doc view isn't so bad. Then again, I'm biased because any major redesign means I'll have to implement it a second time for the forum :)
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent "Vladimir Panteleev" <vladimir thecybershadow.net> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 18:01:14 UTC, Vladimir Panteleev 
wrote:
 Then again, I'm biased because any major redesign means I'll 
 have to implement it a second time for the forum :)
And also fix CHM generation. Let's not forget CHM generation.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent reply "DaveG" <daveg inter.net> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 18:01:14 UTC, Vladimir Panteleev 
wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 17:34:46 UTC, H. S. Teoh via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 05:27:09PM +0000, anonymous via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan 
 Koppe wrote:
Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked 
the dlang.org
site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` 
approach:

http://dlang.skoppe.eu
I must have been taking crazy pills, because everyone else seems to love it, but I don't like the homepage. I have to scroll down way too much to actually see some content. Also, I can't make sense of the order of things. I know this is what-everybody-else-is-doing, and I don't like on other sites either.
[...] +1. I didn't like it either. But then again, the majority of people rarely agree with me, so I didn't say anything. But obviously I'm not alone in disliking this spaced-out layout.
I don't like the front page either, but the doc view isn't so bad.
You're not alone gents. I like some parts and content pages aren't too bad, but the homepage is completely impractical. It feels like I'm emulating a giant phone. The problem with "mobile first" design is the desktop often gets left behind. This may not be a problem for sites that are primarily viewed on phones, but I don't think that will be the case for dlang any time soon.
Jan 21 2015
parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2015-01-21 22:52, DaveG wrote:

 You're not alone gents. I like some parts and content pages aren't too
 bad, but the homepage is completely impractical. It feels like I'm
 emulating a giant phone. The problem with "mobile first" design is the
 desktop often gets left behind. This may not be a problem for sites that
 are primarily viewed on phones, but I don't think that will be the case
 for dlang any time soon.
It doesn't work so great on the phone either. -- /Jacob Carlborg
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "ponce" <contact gam3sfrommars.fr> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I 
 needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc 
 ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, 
 tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about 
 all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In 
 fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. I 
 don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't dmd 
 always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that stuff? 
 I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they are, 
 except me :)
Awesome! I really like the one-click Download and Forum buttons. Idea: DUB logo could link to DUB downloads
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "bachmeier" <no spam.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I 
 needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc 
 ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, 
 tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about 
 all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In 
 fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. I 
 don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't dmd 
 always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that stuff? 
 I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they are, 
 except me :)
And it only took me 20 minutes to get to the bottom of the page. Sorry, not a fan of that design, though I'm apparently the only one.
Jan 21 2015
parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 1/21/15 10:47 AM, bachmeier wrote:
 And it only took me 20 minutes to get to the bottom of the page. Sorry,
 not a fan of that design, though I'm apparently the only one.
There are a few others (including myself) who are not fans of this sparse homepage. IMHO the sparse design requiring a lot of scrolling must be the very point to be impactful. I remember I saw a few sites where scrolling would effect some cool animation at the top, or would gradually (or suddenly) change the visual experience entirely, or would display fragments of a really really long rocket, etc. As things are now I see the sparse intro and I go - interesting. But I also see a fragment of the stuff below it, so I'm like - this wasn't designed for my resolution. So let me scroll down. Then I see those bands alternating with code snippets, and am like, why do I need to scroll through all that crap for three clickable things of interest. I do like the idea of a simple intro homepage with a big invite to download, but if at all it should be wholesome, not the beginning of an arduous scrolling workout. I also like the pages with the menu on the right, they're clean and luminous. They should have collapsible menus. Andrei
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 1/21/2015 6:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the dlang.org site. I
 basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:
Thank you very much for doing this! I very much appreciate the hard work you put into it. For comparison, here are some other language front doors: Swift: https://developer.apple.com/swift/ Go: https://golang.org/ Rust: http://www.rust-lang.org/ C++: http://www.cplusplus.com/ C#: doesn't seem to have one! Java: http://java.com/en/ Haskell: https://www.haskell.org/ Python: https://www.python.org/ Php: http://php.net/ Objective C: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ProgrammingWithObjectiveC/Introduction/Introduction.html Typescript: http://www.typescriptlang.org/ Perl: https://www.perl.org/ Ruby: https://www.ruby-lang.org/en/ Fortran: http://www.fortran.com/ Dart: https://www.dartlang.org/ The Dart one is probably most similar to this proposal. But there definitely is a trend among these sites - a menu across the top, lots of white space, lots of scrolling. I can't say I'm a fan, but it's undeniable what people consider modern. (I like the older style, as it is denser and easier to navigate.)
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent reply "MattCoder" <stop spam.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright 
wrote:
 On 1/21/2015 6:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I
 basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:
Thank you very much for doing this! I very much appreciate the hard work you put into it. For comparison, here are some other language front doors:
I always thought that D deserved something like this: http://learnyouahaskell.com/ Matheus.
Jan 21 2015
parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 20:46:40 UTC, MattCoder wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright 
 wrote:
 On 1/21/2015 6:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I
 basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:
Thank you very much for doing this! I very much appreciate the hard work you put into it. For comparison, here are some other language front doors:
I always thought that D deserved something like this: http://learnyouahaskell.com/ Matheus.
That one is awesome.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Mike" <none none.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright 
wrote:

 The Dart one is probably most similar to this proposal. But 
 there definitely is a trend among these sites - a menu across 
 the top, lots of white space, lots of scrolling. I can't say 
 I'm a fan, but it's undeniable what people consider modern. (I 
 like the older style, as it is denser and easier to navigate.)
You forgot Nim: http://nim-lang.org And I personally like Nim's website best. I have to agree with Walter, and prefer the denser design. This proposal is attractive, though, but the new website trends are too sparse. I realize this is the modern trend, but that trend seems to treat eveything like a 5" smartphone. Mike
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 1/21/2015 3:25 PM, Mike wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:

 The Dart one is probably most similar to this proposal. But there definitely
 is a trend among these sites - a menu across the top, lots of white space,
 lots of scrolling. I can't say I'm a fan, but it's undeniable what people
 consider modern. (I like the older style, as it is denser and easier to
 navigate.)
You forgot Nim: http://nim-lang.org And I personally like Nim's website best.
The slideshow is interesting, though I don't think code should be in them, as it goes to the next slide too quickly.
 I have to agree with Walter, and prefer the denser design.

 This proposal is attractive, though, but the new website trends are too sparse.
 I realize this is the modern trend, but that trend seems to treat eveything
like
 a 5" smartphone.
I don't think that's surprising, but a big desktop display and a smartphone are different enough they need a different mindset. I'm not going to start editing code on a smartphone in the foreseeable future. I need a BFG 9000 display.
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent Rikki Cattermole <alphaglosined gmail.com> writes:
On 22/01/2015 1:11 p.m., Walter Bright wrote:
snip
 I don't think that's surprising, but a big desktop display and a
 smartphone are different enough they need a different mindset. I'm not
 going to start editing code on a smartphone in the foreseeable future. I
 need a BFG 9000 display.
If you only need one monitor, you're doing it wrong. Size doesn't matter.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent "H. S. Teoh via Digitalmars-d" <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> writes:
On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 04:11:38PM -0800, Walter Bright via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 On 1/21/2015 3:25 PM, Mike wrote:
[...]
This proposal is attractive, though, but the new website trends are
too sparse.  I realize this is the modern trend, but that trend seems
to treat eveything like a 5" smartphone.
I don't think that's surprising, but a big desktop display and a smartphone are different enough they need a different mindset.
This makes me think that we need a fluid layout that can handle any aspect ratio you may throw at it. Unfortunately, I don't think CSS is currently able to do that just yet.
 I'm not going to start editing code on a smartphone in the foreseeable
 future.  I need a BFG 9000 display.
Complete with splash damage and tracer rays? :-P T -- WINDOWS = Will Install Needless Data On Whole System -- CompuMan
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "aldanor" <i.s.smirnov gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 23:25:04 UTC, Mike wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright 
 wrote:

 The Dart one is probably most similar to this proposal. But 
 there definitely is a trend among these sites - a menu across 
 the top, lots of white space, lots of scrolling. I can't say 
 I'm a fan, but it's undeniable what people consider modern. (I 
 like the older style, as it is denser and easier to navigate.)
You forgot Nim: http://nim-lang.org And I personally like Nim's website best. I have to agree with Walter, and prefer the denser design. This proposal is attractive, though, but the new website trends are too sparse. I realize this is the modern trend, but that trend seems to treat eveything like a 5" smartphone. Mike
Nim site is not responsive and looks stupid on a mobile device.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 23:25:04 UTC, Mike wrote:
 I have to agree with Walter, and prefer the denser design.

 This proposal is attractive, though, but the new website trends 
 are too sparse.  I realize this is the modern trend, but that 
 trend seems to treat eveything like a 5" smartphone.

 Mike
Agree about the denseness. You need to have good fillers though. Simply minimizing the margins aint enough.
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright
wrote:
 Swift: https://developer.apple.com/swift/

 Go: https://golang.org/

 Rust: http://www.rust-lang.org/

 C++: http://www.cplusplus.com/

 C#: doesn't seem to have one!

 Java: http://java.com/en/

 Haskell: https://www.haskell.org/

 Python: https://www.python.org/

 Php: http://php.net/

 Objective C: 
 https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ProgrammingWithObjectiveC/Introduction/Introduction.html

 Typescript: http://www.typescriptlang.org/

 Perl: https://www.perl.org/

 Ruby: https://www.ruby-lang.org/en/

 Fortran: http://www.fortran.com/

 Dart: https://www.dartlang.org/
Thanks for putting them next to each other. I always joke there is only one designer left.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright
wrote:
 On 1/21/2015 6:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I
 basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:
Thank you very much for doing this! I very much appreciate the hard work you put into it. For comparison, here are some other language front doors: Swift: https://developer.apple.com/swift/ Go: https://golang.org/ Rust: http://www.rust-lang.org/ C++: http://www.cplusplus.com/ C#: doesn't seem to have one! Java: http://java.com/en/ Haskell: https://www.haskell.org/ Python: https://www.python.org/ Php: http://php.net/ Objective C: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ProgrammingWithObjectiveC/Introduction/Introduction.html Typescript: http://www.typescriptlang.org/ Perl: https://www.perl.org/ Ruby: https://www.ruby-lang.org/en/ Fortran: http://www.fortran.com/ Dart: https://www.dartlang.org/ The Dart one is probably most similar to this proposal. But there definitely is a trend among these sites - a menu across the top, lots of white space, lots of scrolling. I can't say I'm a fan, but it's undeniable what people consider modern. (I like the older style, as it is denser and easier to navigate.)
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright wrote:
 On 1/21/2015 6:46 AM, Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I
 basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:
Thank you very much for doing this! I very much appreciate the hard work you put into it. For comparison, here are some other language front doors: Swift: https://developer.apple.com/swift/ Go: https://golang.org/ Rust: http://www.rust-lang.org/ C++: http://www.cplusplus.com/ C#: doesn't seem to have one! Java: http://java.com/en/ Haskell: https://www.haskell.org/ Python: https://www.python.org/ Php: http://php.net/ Objective C: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ProgrammingWithObjectiveC/Introduction/Introduction.html Typescript: http://www.typescriptlang.org/ Perl: https://www.perl.org/ Ruby: https://www.ruby-lang.org/en/ Fortran: http://www.fortran.com/ Dart: https://www.dartlang.org/ The Dart one is probably most similar to this proposal. But there definitely is a trend among these sites - a menu across the top, lots of white space, lots of scrolling. I can't say I'm a fan, but it's undeniable what people consider modern. (I like the older style, as it is denser and easier to navigate.)
Why not think outside the box a little? Design trends change every 3-5 years. I'm sure that users and web designers are already getting sick and tired of the tablet-friendly layout we see everywhere and are thinking of ways to improve and change it. We should think about what the D website needs and maybe we'll come up with an innovative feature (that others may copy). I've learned that every website needs its own tailor made solution. D needs a different approach than C++, Go or Rust. The current approach of presenting code and the three major points (Efficiency, (Modelling) Power, Convenience) is not bad at all. Tools like dub and 3rd party software could be more visible (e.g. "Build D apps easily with dub the D package manager"). Topics of interest like "Using D on Windows" should be visible immediately. Let's first think about the content, what's important and the ways to structure it properly. The layout can be adapted and jazzed up later.
Jan 22 2015
parent "Mengu" <mengukagan gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 10:32:19 UTC, Chris wrote:
 Why not think outside the box a little? Design trends change
 every 3-5 years. I'm sure that users and web designers are
 already getting sick and tired of the tablet-friendly layout we
 see everywhere and are thinking of ways to improve and change 
 it.
 We should think about what the D website needs and maybe we'll
 come up with an innovative feature (that others may copy). I've
 learned that every website needs its own tailor made solution. D
 needs a different approach than C++, Go or Rust. The current
 approach of presenting code and the three major points
 (Efficiency, (Modelling) Power, Convenience) is not bad at all.

 Tools like dub and 3rd party software could be more visible 
 (e.g.
 "Build D apps easily with dub the D package manager"). Topics of
 interest like "Using D on Windows" should be visible 
 immediately.

 Let's first think about the content, what's important and the
 ways to structure it properly. The layout can be adapted and
 jazzed up later.
i agree with you. also, in the home page, there must be bold call to action buttons such as download, learn and get support. that big rounded cornered area can be used for that i think.
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling parent "ponce" <contact gam3sfrommars.fr> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 19:51:57 UTC, Walter Bright 
wrote:
 I can't say, but it's undeniable what people consider modern. 
 (I like the older style, as it is denser and easier to 
 navigate.)
I'm not a big fan of these sites either, but because of association with bold marketing. As I understand, it is popular because it works well on phones/tablets. To me it also seems like these sort of sites are "marketing-first" with unproven claims everywhere and such a layout now screams "bullshit" to my mind, regardless of the content.
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Brad Anderson" <eco gnuk.net> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.
 [snip]
Looks nice. The logo feels out of place. Maybe try one of these more minimalist variations: https://drive.google.com/a/gnuk.net/folderview?id=0Bx3n3LnLsNBzNngyZ055eDhTbGs&usp=sharing# Perhaps d-flat-minimal.svg in white?
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "anonymous" <anonymous example.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 21:13:09 UTC, Brad Anderson 
wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.
 [snip]
Looks nice. The logo feels out of place. Maybe try one of these more minimalist variations: https://drive.google.com/a/gnuk.net/folderview?id=0Bx3n3LnLsNBzNngyZ055eDhTbGs&usp=sharing# Perhaps d-flat-minimal.svg in white?
Here's a mock-up with a wide version of the logo I've been toying around with: http://i.imgur.com/nesKYdQ.png SVG logo: https://mediacru.sh/8eaa7f9c3421
Jan 21 2015
parent reply "Brad Anderson" <eco gnuk.net> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 23:32:29 UTC, anonymous wrote:
 Here's a mock-up with a wide version of the logo I've been 
 toying around with:

 http://i.imgur.com/nesKYdQ.png

 SVG logo: https://mediacru.sh/8eaa7f9c3421
That looks great.
Jan 21 2015
parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 00:39:52 UTC, Brad Anderson wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 23:32:29 UTC, anonymous wrote:
 Here's a mock-up with a wide version of the logo I've been 
 toying around with:

 http://i.imgur.com/nesKYdQ.png

 SVG logo: https://mediacru.sh/8eaa7f9c3421
That looks great.
Yep. That better.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent Rikki Cattermole <alphaglosined gmail.com> writes:
On 22/01/2015 3:46 a.m., Sebastiaan Koppe wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the dlang.org
 site. I basically took the `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language reference (see
 Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a couple of
 hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I needed to change.
 After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc ain't that bad. It is just
 that I didn't have syntax highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I
 hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, tweak
 the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about all the other
 pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In fact, I
 could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. Looking into
 posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all misconfigured, and I bet I am
 supposed to set those manually. I don't get it, doesn't everything has
 its own place? Isn't dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd
 and that stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they
 are, except me :)
I do like this direction. Its giving me ideas.
Jan 21 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Zekereth" <viserion.thrall gmail.com> writes:
First of all I like the new design. Way better than what's here 
now. I'll just throw another site into the mix that I like which 
is Ocaml's site: https://ocaml.org/ .
Jan 21 2015
next sibling parent "Sebastiaan Koppe" <mail skoppe.eu> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 05:27:04 UTC, Zekereth wrote:
 First of all I like the new design. Way better than what's here 
 now. I'll just throw another site into the mix that I like 
 which is Ocaml's site: https://ocaml.org/ .
I like than one and it addresses some of the remarks about a denser site.
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling parent reply "Meta" <jared771 gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 05:27:04 UTC, Zekereth wrote:
 First of all I like the new design. Way better than what's here 
 now. I'll just throw another site into the mix that I like 
 which is Ocaml's site: https://ocaml.org/ .
That's quite nice. It even has a section with recent forum posts. Maybe we should try to emulate it.
Jan 22 2015
parent reply "MattCoder" <stop spam.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 16:58:39 UTC, Meta wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 05:27:04 UTC, Zekereth wrote:
 First of all I like the new design. Way better than what's 
 here now. I'll just throw another site into the mix that I 
 like which is Ocaml's site: https://ocaml.org/ .
That's quite nice. It even has a section with recent forum posts. Maybe we should try to emulate it.
We are already doing that: http://dlang.org/ <- Look at your right :) Matheus.
Jan 22 2015
parent reply "Meta" <jared771 gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 17:00:55 UTC, MattCoder wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 16:58:39 UTC, Meta wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 05:27:04 UTC, Zekereth wrote:
 First of all I like the new design. Way better than what's 
 here now. I'll just throw another site into the mix that I 
 like which is Ocaml's site: https://ocaml.org/ .
That's quite nice. It even has a section with recent forum posts. Maybe we should try to emulate it.
We are already doing that: http://dlang.org/ <- Look at your right :) Matheus.
It doesn't show up on my phone. Anyway, I more meant that we should model our general design off of ocaml.org as their site looks pretty good but still has a lot of information.
Jan 22 2015
parent reply "MattCoder" <stop spam.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 17:03:52 UTC, Meta wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 17:00:55 UTC, MattCoder wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 16:58:39 UTC, Meta wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 05:27:04 UTC, Zekereth wrote:
 First of all I like the new design. Way better than what's 
 here now. I'll just throw another site into the mix that I 
 like which is Ocaml's site: https://ocaml.org/ .
That's quite nice. It even has a section with recent forum posts. Maybe we should try to emulate it.
We are already doing that: http://dlang.org/ <- Look at your right :) Matheus.
It doesn't show up on my phone.
Oh yes, In mine It doesn't show up only when Vertical, but I can see in Horizontal.
 Anyway, I more meant that we should model our general design 
 off of ocaml.org as their site looks pretty good but still has 
 a lot of information.
Indeed, that https://ocaml.org/ is a good start. Matheus.
Jan 22 2015
parent "aldanor" <i.s.smirnov gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 17:15:59 UTC, MattCoder wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 17:03:52 UTC, Meta wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 17:00:55 UTC, MattCoder wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 16:58:39 UTC, Meta wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 05:27:04 UTC, Zekereth wrote:
 First of all I like the new design. Way better than what's 
 here now. I'll just throw another site into the mix that I 
 like which is Ocaml's site: https://ocaml.org/ .
That's quite nice. It even has a section with recent forum posts. Maybe we should try to emulate it.
We are already doing that: http://dlang.org/ <- Look at your right :) Matheus.
It doesn't show up on my phone.
Oh yes, In mine It doesn't show up only when Vertical, but I can see in Horizontal.
 Anyway, I more meant that we should model our general design 
 off of ocaml.org as their site looks pretty good but still has 
 a lot of information.
Indeed, that https://ocaml.org/ is a good start. Matheus.
OCaml's site's using Bootstrap as a framework.. surprise surprise :)
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "ref2401" <refactor24 gmail.com> writes:
Can we just get back the old design, please?
Jan 22 2015
next sibling parent reply "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 14:15:58 UTC, ref2401 wrote:
 Can we just get back the old design, please?
I think it's a waste of time to make the website look "modern" while what we really need is to point out the topics of interest (better): What is D? - Systems programming language - Native (three compilers: dmd, ldc, gdc) - C++/C like - Modelling power - Modern convenience - Cross platform - Interacts with C/C++ - Community driven (free, boost license) - Benchmarks (+ examples) AND also very important - (Build) tools (dub, dvm) - GUI toolkits - third party libraries - Guide to Windows integration - ... (please fill in) (basically all the major points that newbies ask about on the forum) The layout should be clear and simple ("one-click-shops"), whether we jazz it up later is not so important now. I know that hours and days can be wasted with getting the CSS and JS right, however a convenient and clear structure are more important now than shiny icons and the like. In fact, thinking about the content/structure might give rise to new ideas as regards the design. If the design is there first, it adds unnecessary constraints regarding the structure / content, i.e. the free flow of ideas.
Jan 22 2015
parent "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 14:54:16 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 14:15:58 UTC, ref2401 wrote:
 Can we just get back the old design, please?
I think it's a waste of time to make the website look "modern" while what we really need is to point out the topics of interest (better): What is D? - Systems programming language - Native (three compilers: dmd, ldc, gdc) - C++/C like - Modelling power - Modern convenience - Cross platform - Interacts with C/C++ - Community driven (free, boost license) - Benchmarks (+ examples) AND also very important - (Build) tools (dub, dvm) - GUI toolkits - third party libraries - Guide to Windows integration - ... (please fill in) (basically all the major points that newbies ask about on the forum) The layout should be clear and simple ("one-click-shops"), whether we jazz it up later is not so important now. I know that hours and days can be wasted with getting the CSS and JS right, however a convenient and clear structure are more important now than shiny icons and the like. In fact, thinking about the content/structure might give rise to new ideas as regards the design. If the design is there first, it adds unnecessary constraints regarding the structure / content, i.e. the free flow of ideas.
PS What annoys me about the modern, tablet friendly layouts is that once you enter a section, you lose reference to other sections, i.e. you have to browse back to the entry point, because the menu logic has changed. Example: https://ocaml.org/learn/ If you click on one of the tutorials, say "Basics" (https://ocaml.org/learn/tutorials/basics.html), you have to go back to "Learn" to be able to go to the list of tutorials. We should avoid that. Btw, a cool feature for the library section would be a way to quickly scroll up / jump back to the top of the page, like e.g. the up arrow on duckduckgo.com that takes you to the top of the page, or simply a "back to top" link under each function documentation. That would really help.
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 1/22/15 6:15 AM, ref2401 wrote:
 Can we just get back the old design, please?
No. -- Andrei
Jan 22 2015
prev sibling parent reply "NVolcz" <niklas.volcz gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones I 
 needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So ddoc 
 ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some macro's, 
 tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to worry about 
 all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. In 
 fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. I 
 don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't dmd 
 always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that stuff? 
 I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or they are, 
 except me :)
+1. Nice. One thing, too much space and to large fonts. As a user I get to little information without having to scroll.
Jan 22 2015
parent "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Thursday, 22 January 2015 at 16:00:51 UTC, NVolcz wrote:
 On Wednesday, 21 January 2015 at 14:46:22 UTC, Sebastiaan Koppe 
 wrote:
 Just for fun and proof-of-concept I went ahead and forked the 
 dlang.org site. I basically took the 
 `do-what-everybody-else-is-doing` approach:

 http://dlang.skoppe.eu

 It is still a wip, but the landing page and the language 
 reference (see Docs menu-item) is working.

 Doing the ddoc was a maze of macro's at first. But spending a 
 couple of hours untangling the mess, I finally found the ones 
 I needed to change. After that things went pretty smooth. So 
 ddoc ain't that bad. It is just that I didn't have syntax 
 highlighting - nor goto-definition - and I hate that.

 Still, it is cool in a way that I can just change some 
 macro's, tweak the index.dd, the doc.ddoc and don't have to 
 worry about all the other pages.

 BTW, the build process on windows was way easier than linux. 
 In fact, I could not get the makefile to run on linux at all. 
 Looking into posix.mak, I see a blur of path's, all 
 misconfigured, and I bet I am supposed to set those manually. 
 I don't get it, doesn't everything has its own place? Isn't 
 dmd always installed in /usr/bin, /usr/include/dmd and that 
 stuff? I suppose not everyone is using the same distro. Or 
 they are, except me :)
+1. Nice. One thing, too much space and to large fonts. As a user I get to little information without having to scroll.
And please don't forget accessibility! Keep it simple, because the blind and visually impaired cannot use fancy stuff that depends heavily on JS. (cf. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_accessibility#Standards_and_guidelines)
Jan 22 2015