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digitalmars.D - blast from the (recent) past

reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/9zqj0/the_state_of_d_programming_is_this_situation/

Also, there's a much less popular discussion about the Thermopylae excerpt:

http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/9z41o/andrei_alexandrescus_book_about_the_d_programming/

(I'm not 100% convinced it's ethical to give the second link here, 
because there's clearly an implied invitation to upvote. Please advise.)


Andrei
Oct 31 2009
parent reply bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Andrei Alexandrescu:

 (I'm not 100% convinced it's ethical to give the second link here, 
 because there's clearly an implied invitation to upvote. Please advise.)

I think it's OK. You are not asking people to up-vote, and people here are free to down-vote too if they don't like. Showing your links to the things you like is not bad. Regarding your book about D, I think it will be a nice manual about a language in development, and I'll buy&read it, but it's not the kind of computer book I like most. I like programming books that 1) show the practice of programming, or 2) that teach a new programming language while they show how to do something else (like some part of computer graphics, simulations, etc). In many years I have found only very few books that show the practice of programming: Programming Pearls, Game Programming Gems, Turtle Geometry, Beautiful Code, and very few others. If you know more please tell me :-) Bye, bearophile
Nov 01 2009
parent reply Justin Johansson <no spam.com> writes:
bearophile Wrote:

 Andrei Alexandrescu:
 
 (I'm not 100% convinced it's ethical to give the second link here, 
 because there's clearly an implied invitation to upvote. Please advise.)

I think it's OK. You are not asking people to up-vote, and people here are free to down-vote too if they don't like. Showing your links to the things you like is not bad. Regarding your book about D, I think it will be a nice manual about a language in development, and I'll buy&read it, but it's not the kind of computer book I like most. I like programming books that 1) show the practice of programming, or 2) that teach a new programming language while they show how to do something else (like some part of computer graphics, simulations, etc). In many years I have found only very few books that show the practice of programming: Programming Pearls, Game Programming Gems, Turtle Geometry, Beautiful Code, and very few others. If you know more please tell me :-) Bye, bearophile

"Beautiful Code"? bearophile, is that the book with chapters written by many different authors including one (or possibly more) by Douglas Crockford? Whilst I don't have the hardcopy I seem to remember reading an online edition of one of the chapters by him and it was great. Hmm, operator precedence parsing (lit. circa 1970?) revisted by Crockford in Javascript, if that serves my memory? Trust this is the same book. (Hey thanks, for sake of karma, in moving this thread along from negativity.) ciao justin
Nov 01 2009
parent bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Justin Johansson:

 "Beautiful Code"?

"Beautiful Code", it's not the best computer book, and some of the chapters are not so interesting, but overall is good enough: http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596510046 Programming Pearls, I'd like several more books like this: http://www.cs.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/pearls/ The wonderful "Turtle Geometry", maybe the best computer book I've read, it's for new programmers: http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=7287 "Game Programming Gems", they use mostly C++, a nice series of books that show programming practice: http://www.gameprogramminggems.com/ "Exploring Mathematics with Mathematica", this too is cute, but the Mathematica language itself is awful for programming, its line-oriented editor is terrible for programming (Notepad is better) and the Mathematica itself is really costly and Wolfram's ego is so huge that you can usually measure the diameter of your ego using just milliwolframs. So this books has some downsides too. http://library.wolfram.com/infocenter/Books/3525/ Bye, bearophile
Nov 01 2009