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digitalmars.D.announce - Walter on his experience as a dev, on running an open source project

reply deadalnix <deadalnix gmail.com> writes:
https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
Jan 19
next sibling parent reply Joakim <dlang joakim.fea.st> writes:
On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 03:13:38 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
Thanks for the link, just watched all four parts. I'm not sure Walter is the right speaker for those kids, like having Yoda lecture a bunch of young padewan. His half-float example was likely too low-level for that audience, better to show something you'd do in ruby or python and explain how it'd run _much_ faster in D, while not much more difficult to write.
Jan 20
parent reply Rikki Cattermole <alphaglosined gmail.com> writes:
On 20/01/16 11:58 PM, Joakim wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 03:13:38 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
Thanks for the link, just watched all four parts. I'm not sure Walter is the right speaker for those kids, like having Yoda lecture a bunch of young padewan. His half-float example was likely too low-level for that audience, better to show something you'd do in ruby or python and explain how it'd run _much_ faster in D, while not much more difficult to write.
From what Walter said, they all knew c. So not really too low level for them.
Jan 20
next sibling parent reply epsilomish <epsilomish nowhere.it> writes:
On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 11:07:16 UTC, Rikki Cattermole 
wrote:
 On 20/01/16 11:58 PM, Joakim wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 03:13:38 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
Thanks for the link, just watched all four parts. I'm not sure Walter is the right speaker for those kids, like having Yoda lecture a bunch of young padewan. His half-float example was likely too low-level for that audience, better to show something you'd do in ruby or python and explain how it'd run _much_ faster in D, while not much more difficult to write.
From what Walter said, they all knew c. So not really too low level for them.
But half-float uses the 'alias this' trick, furthemore on a getter function. Without a bit of D knowledge you can't get how it's subtle.
Jan 20
parent reply Rikki Cattermole <alphaglosined gmail.com> writes:
On 21/01/16 12:22 AM, epsilomish wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 11:07:16 UTC, Rikki Cattermole wrote:
 On 20/01/16 11:58 PM, Joakim wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 03:13:38 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
Thanks for the link, just watched all four parts. I'm not sure Walter is the right speaker for those kids, like having Yoda lecture a bunch of young padewan. His half-float example was likely too low-level for that audience, better to show something you'd do in ruby or python and explain how it'd run _much_ faster in D, while not much more difficult to write.
From what Walter said, they all knew c. So not really too low level for them.
But half-float uses the 'alias this' trick, furthemore on a getter function. Without a bit of D knowledge you can't get how it's subtle.
Yeah I agree, alias this was definitely too much for them. But half float wasn't an issue IMO.
Jan 20
parent reply epsilomish <epsilomish nowhere.it> writes:
On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 11:24:11 UTC, Rikki Cattermole 
wrote:
 On 21/01/16 12:22 AM, epsilomish wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 11:07:16 UTC, Rikki 
 Cattermole wrote:
 On 20/01/16 11:58 PM, Joakim wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 03:13:38 UTC, deadalnix 
 wrote:
 https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
Thanks for the link, just watched all four parts. I'm not sure Walter is the right speaker for those kids, like having Yoda lecture a bunch of young padewan. His half-float example was likely too low-level for that audience, better to show something you'd do in ruby or python and explain how it'd run _much_ faster in D, while not much more difficult to write.
From what Walter said, they all knew c. So not really too low level for them.
But half-float uses the 'alias this' trick, furthemore on a getter function. Without a bit of D knowledge you can't get how it's subtle.
Yeah I agree, alias this was definitely too much for them. But half float wasn't an issue IMO.
Actually, the 'alias this' is probably not that much a problem. In their shoes I would even ask myself: mmh what is this obscure feature, let's have a deeper look to D...Anyway the technical part of the talk is small, there is the thing about lexical D t_h_i_n_g_s, the octal template and half-floats...It globally works.
Jan 20
parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 1/20/2016 12:41 PM, epsilomish wrote:
 Actually, the 'alias this' is probably not that much a problem. In their shoes
I
 would even ask myself: mmh what is this obscure feature, let's have a deeper
 look to D...Anyway the technical part of the talk is small, there is the thing
 about lexical D t_h_i_n_g_s, the octal template and half-floats...It globally
 works.
I wanted a mix of trivial and advanced stuff, so there was something for everyone.
Jan 20
parent epsilomish <epsilomish nowhere.it> writes:
On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 21:38:55 UTC, Walter Bright 
wrote:
 On 1/20/2016 12:41 PM, epsilomish wrote:
 Actually, the 'alias this' is probably not that much a 
 problem. In their shoes I
 would even ask myself: mmh what is this obscure feature, let's 
 have a deeper
 look to D...Anyway the technical part of the talk is small, 
 there is the thing
 about lexical D t_h_i_n_g_s, the octal template and 
 half-floats...It globally
 works.
I wanted a mix of trivial and advanced stuff, so there was something for everyone.
That's well reflected, despite of my first comment. One thing I'd like to say in reaction the first part: noise and fan. Personally I can't live without noise anymore. I used to be obsessional about silence but now I think it's very relaxing to have a fan turning again and again, by fan I mean: http://www.cinni.com.au/images/pedestalFans.jpg They produce a LF vibe which is very relaxing. For example now, here, where I live: https://www.google.fr/maps/ 48.5591464,7.7793422,9z?hl=fr It's 21.2 F° outside, but I still have the good vibes from the low frequency generator in my computer room. a steady purr.
Jan 20
prev sibling parent reply thedeemon <dlang thedeemon.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 11:07:16 UTC, Rikki Cattermole 
wrote:
 From what Walter said, they all knew c. So not really too low 
 level for them.
To me it looked like: Walter: "You all write in C, right?" Audience silent with expression on their faces "What is C? We've only heard about JavaScript". ;)
Jan 20
parent reply deadalnix <deadalnix gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 21 January 2016 at 05:14:03 UTC, thedeemon wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 11:07:16 UTC, Rikki Cattermole 
 wrote:
 From what Walter said, they all knew c. So not really too low 
 level for them.
To me it looked like: Walter: "You all write in C, right?" Audience silent with expression on their faces "What is C? We've only heard about JavaScript". ;)
Isn't C that language that compiles to javascript ?
Jan 21
parent Jacob Carlborg <doob me.com> writes:
On 2016-01-21 11:01, deadalnix wrote:
 On Thursday, 21 January 2016 at 05:14:03 UTC, thedeemon wrote:
 On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 11:07:16 UTC, Rikki Cattermole wrote:
 From what Walter said, they all knew c. So not really too low level
 for them.
To me it looked like: Walter: "You all write in C, right?" Audience silent with expression on their faces "What is C? We've only heard about JavaScript". ;)
Isn't C that language that compiles to javascript ?
No, it compiles to CoffeeScript which then compiles to JavaScript. -- /Jacob Carlborg
Jan 21
prev sibling next sibling parent reply burjui <bytefu gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 03:13:38 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
I also prefer to work at night, mainly because of silence. A simple test: listen to a song in your headphones at day, then listen to it on the same volume level at night. Recently I almost stopped listening to music (even ambient) while I write code, because it turns out I do less mistakes and overlook things not so often, when I code in silence. It makes coding less entertaining, but more productive.
Jan 21
parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 1/21/2016 5:06 AM, burjui wrote:
 Recently I almost stopped listening to music (even ambient) while I
 write code, because it turns out I do less mistakes and overlook things not so
 often, when I code in silence. It makes coding less entertaining, but more
 productive.
The trick is to turn the volume down so the music is barely perceptible.
Jan 21
prev sibling parent Abdulhaq <alynch4047 gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 20 January 2016 at 03:13:38 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/41sdzj/walter_bright_on_being_a_developer_running_an/
I really enjoyed this talk, it's very interesting to see how Walter works and to compare it with our own personal preferences. Walter talks about how to manage the ebb and flow of motivation when working on a long term project. His suggestion of always doing some small bit of work on it on a daily basis was new to me and seems like a great idea. Personally I also like to rotate what I work on within the project, and will switch to something new and interesting when the everyday parts get boring. I'm pretty sure Walter also does this to maintain his own motivation, and this explains why he doesn't always work on what seems most important in the D world, but instead whatever is required to keep his own excitement for the project alive. A recent example is when he worked on optimising DMD instead of various other more mundane but arguably important tasks. The fact is, as developers we sometimes have to nourish our motivation even at the expense of delaying some of the more important but less rewarding work.
Jan 23