www.digitalmars.com         C & C++   DMDScript  

digitalmars.D.announce - Programming Windows D Examples are now Online!

reply Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
This is a translation project of Charles Petzold's Programming Windows
(5th edition) book code samples.

Currently over 120 code samples have been translated into D, with only
a few modules remaining.

Everything else you need to know is in the Readme file:
https://github.com/AndrejMitrovic/DWindowsProgramming

The examples were tested on fresh installs of XP and Win7 with the
only dependency being DMD v2.053 and an NT operating system. I hope
everyone will be able to build these examples without too much
trouble. *crosses fingers*
Jun 20 2011
next sibling parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/20/2011 9:14 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 This is a translation project of Charles Petzold's Programming Windows
 (5th edition) book code samples.

 Currently over 120 code samples have been translated into D, with only
 a few modules remaining.

 Everything else you need to know is in the Readme file:
 https://github.com/AndrejMitrovic/DWindowsProgramming

 The examples were tested on fresh installs of XP and Win7 with the
 only dependency being DMD v2.053 and an NT operating system. I hope
 everyone will be able to build these examples without too much
 trouble. *crosses fingers*

This is nice work. When you're done, let's post a link on Reddit!
Jun 20 2011
parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/20/2011 10:11 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 Btw, would it be good idea to link this somewhere on the homepage?

Sure! Wanna generate a pull request?
Jun 21 2011
parent Trass3r <un known.com> writes:
Am 21.06.2011, 20:32 Uhr, schrieb Andrej Mitrovic  
<andrej.mitrovich gmail.com>:
 I don't know whether it is planned to incorporate the WinAPI bindings
 into Phobos/Druntime, there's at least 2.5 megs of code in prototypes
 and I'm not sure about the license (it's based on the MinGW headers).

That is indeed long overdue!
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> wrote:
 This is nice work. When you're done, let's post a link on Reddit!

Let's shake the bees nest? :p I'll have to make some kind of workaround for D DLLs for a few examples. I'll see about doing this these days. There's a few audio examples I'll finish tomorrow (I just need to plug my guitar to see if it records anything), and then I'm almost done with making all examples compile. After that some polishing can be done gradually. Btw, would it be good idea to link this somewhere on the homepage? Maybe a page like this: http://d-programming-language.org/windows.html I've already linked it from the dwiki.
Jun 20 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Andrej Mitrovic:

 Everything else you need to know is in the Readme file:
 https://github.com/AndrejMitrovic/DWindowsProgramming

It looks like a lot of work! I have not tried to compile the code yet. I am not asking you to modify the code, but D with() was designed to reduce noise in code like: wndclass.style = CS_HREDRAW | CS_VREDRAW; wndclass.lpfnWndProc = &WndProc; wndclass.cbClsExtra = 0; wndclass.cbWndExtra = 0; wndclass.hInstance = hInstance; wndclass.hIcon = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION); wndclass.hCursor = LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW); wndclass.hbrBackground = cast(HBRUSH) GetStockObject(WHITE_BRUSH); wndclass.lpszMenuName = appName.toUTF16z; wndclass.lpszClassName = appName.toUTF16z; The code in those examples is generally very noisy (I presume about as much as the original code). I have mixed feelings about it. Sometimes final switches are not easy to retrofit. Bye, bearophile
Jun 21 2011
next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 8:58 AM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 The examples will be continued to be improved and refactored, but I
 had to start hosting them otherwise I'd never finish the project.

I'm glad you decided to host them on github. Github has been a great boon for D in crowdsourcing improvements!
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling parent reply bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Andrej Mitrovic:

 Having a 1-to-1 translation helps in catching bugs
 (and I've had quite a few of those).

After translating so much code have you seen some recurring patterns in your code conversion bugs? Time ago I have suggested a -cstyle compiler switch to DMD that activates some C-isms like C-style array declarations, and activates warnings useful to catch common conversion bugs, like a warning against passing by value large fixed-static arrays, having large static arrays of floating point values (that are initialized with NaN, so they cause quite large binaries), and so on.
 2. Generally calling into GDI is going to be much more noisy than
 using some 3rd party GUI library,

Right. I'd like the standard D distribution to have a little graphics module like simplegraphics, that I use now and then (not written by me) :-) Bye, bearophile
Jun 21 2011
next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 12:35 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 [...]

This is interesting and valuable information. Please add it to your repository as a readme, or even as a blog post!
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 12:35 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 Float/Doubles are initialized to NaN in D, however I don't know what
 they're initialized to in C.

In C they're initialized to 0 for globals, and garbage for locals and allocated data.
 A big issue with porting is that D's character arrays are always
 initialized to invalid values. This wreaks havoc in code, in
 particular with static arrays. For example:

      char[100] buffer;
      APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr);
      myDStringFunction(buffer[]);  //<- buggy code

In C buffer is not initialized to 0, if it is not global, it is initialized to garbage.
 The problem is twofold. First, the API call might not work because it
 could easily expect a null terminator to be present as a first
 character:
      char[100] buffer;
      APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr);  // Might not work!

Fix: char[100] buffer = 0;
 So when you finally call a D function with such a static array, it
 could print out garbage or throw an exception:
      char[100] buffer;
      APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr);
      myDStringFunction(buffer[]);  // what will this function do when
 stumbles on '\0' or char.init?

Fix: char[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); auto p = buffer[0 .. strlen(buffer.ptr)]; myDStringFunction(p);
Jun 21 2011
next sibling parent Brad Roberts <braddr puremagic.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 2:24 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 Walter, would it be possible to make .map file generation follow the
 -od flag? It's odd when a  build script fills a directory with map
 files while executables and object files are properly in their own
 directories as specified via -od and -of flags.
 
 Btw, I have just pushed a changeset and made the build script
 parallel. I turned this:
 foreach (dir; dirs)
 
 into this:
 foreach (dir; taskPool.parallel(dirs, 1))
 
 And added other small cosmetic changes, but the above is the only real change.
 
 Here's my timings:
 Serial build: 1min, 3sec
 Parallel build: 22sec

Fixed in 2.053. See also bug 4833.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Brad Roberts <braddr puremagic.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 2:45 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 Wait, I'm using 2.054 from github. This might be a regression. I'll
investigate.

I just checked the source for dmd's link.c (where the changes were) and it hasn't changed. I just ran some quick tests on linux and it appears to be working correctly still. Testing on windows is a tad more painful for me, so I haven't re-tested it there. Take a look at the pull request listed in the ticket for the test cases that were run. Something you're doing is different than the test cases (which were tested on win32 as well as linux at the time).
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Robert Clipsham <robert octarineparrot.com> writes:
On 21/06/2011 22:24, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 Walter, would it be possible to make .map file generation follow the
 -od flag? It's odd when a  build script fills a directory with map
 files while executables and object files are properly in their own
 directories as specified via -od and -of flags.

 Btw, I have just pushed a changeset and made the build script
 parallel. I turned this:
 foreach (dir; dirs)

 into this:
 foreach (dir; taskPool.parallel(dirs, 1))

 And added other small cosmetic changes, but the above is the only real change.

 Here's my timings:
 Serial build: 1min, 3sec
 Parallel build: 22sec

I use D as a build script for my project too, it's awesome how easy it is to make the build parallel, and how much compilation time it saves! Side note: parallel() works as an alias for taskPool.parallel, saves you some characters and looks nicer! -- Robert http://octarineparrot.com/
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 1:46 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 	char[100] buffer;
 	APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr);
           auto p = buffer[0 .. strlen(buffer.ptr)];
 	myDStringFunction(p);

Yeah I was going to suggest that. My only problem was I didn't know where to look for an strlen equivalent for UTF, but I found it in std.utf and it's called stride().

I think there's a misunderstanding somewhere. strlen() works just fine on UTF-8 code.
Jun 21 2011
parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 5:41 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 I need a UTF16 strlen function for wchar*.

wcslen()
Jun 21 2011
parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 6:08 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 You, sir, are a gentleman and a scholar.

I've been called worse :-)
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 2:24 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 Walter, would it be possible to make .map file generation follow the
 -od flag? It's odd when a  build script fills a directory with map
 files while executables and object files are properly in their own
 directories as specified via -od and -of flags.

I think it's a good idea. Please post to bugzilla!
 Btw, I have just pushed a changeset and made the build script
 parallel. I turned this:
 foreach (dir; dirs)

 into this:
 foreach (dir; taskPool.parallel(dirs, 1))

 And added other small cosmetic changes, but the above is the only real change.

 Here's my timings:
 Serial build: 1min, 3sec
 Parallel build: 22sec

Awesome!
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 6/21/2011 4:17 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 On 6/21/11, Andrej Mitrovic<andrej.mitrovich gmail.com>  wrote:
 On 6/21/11, Jonathan M Davis<jmdavisProg gmx.com>  wrote:
 stride isn't a UTF version of strlen.

Brain misshap, I meant std.utf.count.

Double brain misshap. I wasn't looking for code-point count of a D string, but of a zero-terminated wchar*.

wcslen()
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent zsxxsz <zhengshuxin gmail.com> writes:
Excellent! I've build and run it all ok.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> wrote:
 I am not asking you to modify the code, but D with() was designed to reduce
 noise in code like:

     wndclass.style = CS_HREDRAW | CS_VREDRAW;
     wndclass.lpfnWndProc = &WndProc;
     wndclass.cbClsExtra = 0;
     wndclass.cbWndExtra = 0;
     wndclass.hInstance = hInstance;
     wndclass.hIcon = LoadIcon(NULL, IDI_APPLICATION);
     wndclass.hCursor = LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW);
     wndclass.hbrBackground = cast(HBRUSH) GetStockObject(WHITE_BRUSH);
     wndclass.lpszMenuName = appName.toUTF16z;
     wndclass.lpszClassName = appName.toUTF16z;

Yes, the original code is quite noisy, especially considering that a lot of code uses pointers and state variables for strcpy calls and things like that.
 The code in those examples is generally very noisy (I presume about as much
 as the original code). I have mixed feelings about it.

Yes, it's noisy because of a couple of things: 1. I haven't worked a lot on actually using D idioms. My main concern was making the examples compile and work in the exact way as the original examples. Having a 1-to-1 translation helps in catching bugs (and I've had quite a few of those). 2. Generally calling into GDI is going to be much more noisy than using some 3rd party GUI library, the same goes for various other WinAPI functions as well. You have to manually acquire and release GDI resources so this complicates things. 3. I've added some excessive noise in some code since I've used a lot of to!string() and duplication workarounds to get the examples compiling. This will be replaced with better code. The examples will be continued to be improved and refactored, but I had to start hosting them otherwise I'd never finish the project.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> wrote:
 On 6/20/2011 10:11 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 Btw, would it be good idea to link this somewhere on the homepage?

Sure! Wanna generate a pull request?

Yeah I'll cook something up and make a pull. Btw, std.c.windows.windows and the WindowsAPI bindings clash when used together. The root of the problem is type definitions like these: typedef void* HINSTANCE; The problem is that both bindings create this typedef, and the compiler treats them as separate types. From what I recall I've tried to compile something like this before (this is just a snippet): import win32.windef; import core.sys.windows.dll; extern (Windows) BOOL DllMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, ULONG ulReason, LPVOID pvReserved) { switch (ulReason) { case DLL_PROCESS_ATTACH: g_hInst = hInstance; dll_process_attach( hInstance, true ); break; case DLL_PROCESS_DETACH: dll_process_detach( hInstance, true ); break; case DLL_THREAD_ATTACH: dll_thread_attach( true, true ); break; case DLL_THREAD_DETACH: dll_thread_detach( true, true ); break; default: } return true; } However this won't work. dll_process_attach() can't be called with the `hInstance` argument because it's defined as a typedef in `win32.windef`, while dll_process_attach has the parameter defined as a typedef somewhere in `core.windows` or a similar module. I don't know whether it is planned to incorporate the WinAPI bindings into Phobos/Druntime, there's at least 2.5 megs of code in prototypes and I'm not sure about the license (it's based on the MinGW headers). std.c.windows.windows is already growing as people need to call more API functions (just recently a bunch of prototypes were added for std.registry). It seems odd having to waste time writing function prototypes when this was already done long ago in the WinAPI bindings.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> wrote:
 After translating so much code have you seen some recurring patterns in your
 code conversion bugs?

A lot of C code is missing default labels. I've used the github 2.054 clone to compile all examples in order to catch missing labels at compile time. I've missed many of them before this feature became available. Float/Doubles are initialized to NaN in D, however I don't know what they're initialized to in C. But it seems none of the examples had floating point variables initialized. This causes halts/exceptions in D, and without ddbg it's really hard to track down what went wrong. I don't think the stack traces helped me in this regard. Generally forgetting to initialize floats seems to be common in other C code as well. C struct initializer syntax is used for static arrays of structs in the C code. I think this could easily be a source of bugs if you add or remove fields from a struct. I'm not sure if that syntax works in D but I've used explicit ctor calls instead, such as: struct Foo { int x, y; } Foo[5] foo = [Foo(1, 2), Foo(1, 2), Foo(1, 2), Foo(1, 2), Foo(1, 2)]; It's verbose but it's safer. In some code a variable would be defined as an int, and returned as a short. There are other cases where it's defined as an int, and then casted to a ubyte (BYTE is an alias for ubyte there). I have to fix some of these. I did notice an annoying thing with D, for example: ubyte val = min(0, 128); Error: cannot implicitly convert expression (min(0,128)) of type int to ubyte The problem with this is I have to add a cast or a safer to!() call. to!() can only do a runtime check: ubyte val = to!ubyte(min(1024, 2048)); // overflow exception at runtime And a cast is completely unsafe: ubyte val = cast(ubyte)(min(1024, 2048)); // no error, bugs introduced! Of course the compiler doesn't know what min does, only that it returns an int, so I don't know whether it could ever figure out that a function would never return a value that overflows the assignment variable (maybe this feature could be implemented for pure functions..). C Globals become an instant source of bugs as soon as you fire up a new thread. This is due to D's thread-local storage by default feature. I like D's approach, and C globals should be replaced with messaging or some other technique. I've used __gshared in various modules to make the examples compile and work properly, but this should be replaced. This isn't unique to these examples. I've seen globals used everywhere for messaging purposes in C code, e.g. some audio processing examples in a different library. A weird thing I've seen in the examples was a pointer to a static variable was passed to a newly spawned thread's function. And via this static variable the original thread and the work thread communicated together. How this can work is beyond me, but it can't work in D. Luckily D's spawn() function does offer protection for this kind of code. These examples used implicit fallbacks a lot, with only a comment explicitly mentioning that there is a fallback in play. I think it's good that we've abandoned implicit fallbacks, they could easily cause bugs. But, on the other hand someone might get an error about an implicit fallback and think they forgot to add a "break" when porting C code. So they add that, but now they've introduced a bug because the fallback was actually necessary. I had this happen to me in one example because the fallback wasn't explicitly mentioned. There are issues with calling format() and writef(). This is not just for this translation project. Most C code uses some form of printf/wsprintf to either store a string to a variable or print it out. But the format specifiers often do not translate into D. I think what is probably causing this is that C types are not the same as D types, so when you see this in C code: printf("Note Count %ld, (long) notescount); This might not translate into D and you could easily get an exception at runtime (a pity that this doesn't get caught at compile-time). The root of the problem is that the format specifiers explicitly name the type, while you inadvertently change the actual type in D (maybe you were fixing a conversion bug), and then you randomly get an exception thrown at runtime. The #1 problem with these exceptions is that you get no error line whatsoever. You just get back "Invalid format specifier" or something like that. This is of no help, and I always have to fire up ddbg or manually hunt down each format specifier and replace it with D's safe "%s", which works great. The exceptions with no error line problem is common for most Phobos functions, I absolutely hate getting back an error message such as: std.exception.ErrnoException std\stdio.d(286): Cannot open file `blablabla' in mode `r' (No such file or directory) No stack trace, no error line except the error line in Phobos. I *don't care* about error lines in Phobos, the error is in my code not in Phobos, and I really think this needs to improve. Many functions assume ASCII or USC2, both of which are wrong to assume these days. I have some examples I still have to fix, because I've used code like: string buffer; TextOut(buffer.toUTF16z, buffer.length); This is incorrect code. TextOut takes the number of characters, not code units when issuing the call. The code will compile and run fine for the majority of cases because most characters will fit into wchar's code point, and you will have a 1to1 code-point to code-unit ratio. But add a Japanese character and you will see garbage being printed out to the screen. The correct workaround for this is to either: 1) Store everything as a dchar[]: dstring buffer; TextOut(buffer.toUTF16z, buffer.length); // correct as long as UTF never has more than 4 code units 2) Use some Phobos code-point counting function string buffer; TextOut(buffer.toUTF16z, std.utf.count(buffer)); The second option might cause performance issues, while using UTF32 dchars might cause excessive use of memory. Other solutions might be to wrap strings and cache the count of code points. It's a balancing act between memory and performance. Some API functions take char* as a parameter when expecting some pointer to a data buffer which can but doesn't necessarily store text. I don't know why char* is used instead of void*, perhaps char* are more often used with these functions so they've decided to type it like that. There are many cases of implicit 0 to void* casts, but D catches this at compile time. A big issue with porting is that D's character arrays are always initialized to invalid values. This wreaks havoc in code, in particular with static arrays. For example: char[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); myDStringFunction(buffer[]); // <- buggy code The problem is twofold. First, the API call might not work because it could easily expect a null terminator to be present as a first character: char[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); // Might not work! So I've had to do this: char[100] buffer; buffer[] = '\0'; // or buffer[0] = '\0', depending on the function APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); Second, after the call you will have a buffer that has some valid text stored into it, and then either null terminators to the length of the array (if you did buffer[] = '\0'), OR you will have a null terminator followed by a series of char.init invalid UTF values. So when you finally call a D function with such a static array, it could print out garbage or throw an exception: char[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); myDStringFunction(buffer[]); // what will this function do when stumbles on '\0' or char.init? Behind the scense that D function might in turn call a C function, so continued from the last example: char[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); myDStringFunction(buffer[]); void myDStringFunction(char[] buffer) { // huge mess, the API function might write nonsense like ['f', 'o', 'o', '\0', char.init, char.init..] APIPrintToScreen(buffer.ptr, buffer.length); } So you have to do conversion and duplication all the time. You have to do: char[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); // buffer might now be ['f', 'o', 'o', '\0', char.init, char.init..]; myDStringFunction(to!string(buffer.ptr.toStringz)); How it works: First, you need to treat the buffer as a C null-terminated char array, hence using .ptr. Then, you have to call a Phobos function so it can retrieve a string until the first null terminator. But it gets worse when UTF is in play because in v2.043 conv.to doesn't know how to convert wchar*'s. I've made a request on github and I think this feature will be incorporated, but for now you can't do this: wchar[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); myDStringFunction(to!string(buffer.ptr)); // error, to!() can't convert wchar* So I've had to create my own function which converts a wchar* to wchar[], which can then be used for whatever purpose: wchar[100] buffer; APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr); myDStringFunction(to!string(fromWStringz(buffer.ptr))); So generally static arrays of characters and string handling between C and D can be painful.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> wrote:
 Fix:

         char[100] buffer = 0;

I didn't know about this syntax! I've been under a rock apparently.
 Fix:
 	char[100] buffer;
 	APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr);
          auto p = buffer[0 .. strlen(buffer.ptr)];
 	myDStringFunction(p);

Yeah I was going to suggest that. My only problem was I didn't know where to look for an strlen equivalent for UTF, but I found it in std.utf and it's called stride(). I'll fix these examples soon. I'll give a thought or two about that blogging idea as well, thanks.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent "Jonathan M Davis" <jmdavisProg gmx.com> writes:
On 2011-06-21 13:46, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 On 6/21/11, Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> wrote:
 Fix:
 char[100] buffer = 0;

I didn't know about this syntax! I've been under a rock apparently.
 Fix:
 char[100] buffer;
 APIWriteToBuffer(buffer.ptr);
 
 auto p = buffer[0 .. strlen(buffer.ptr)];
 
 myDStringFunction(p);

Yeah I was going to suggest that. My only problem was I didn't know where to look for an strlen equivalent for UTF, but I found it in std.utf and it's called stride().

stride isn't a UTF version of strlen. stride returns how many code units it is to the beginning of the next code point. You can use it to get the number of characters in a string by calling it in a loop, but it isn't a UTF version of strlen. - Jonathan M Davis
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Jonathan M Davis <jmdavisProg gmx.com> wrote:
 stride isn't a UTF version of strlen.

Brain misshap, I meant std.utf.count.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
Walter, would it be possible to make .map file generation follow the
-od flag? It's odd when a  build script fills a directory with map
files while executables and object files are properly in their own
directories as specified via -od and -of flags.

Btw, I have just pushed a changeset and made the build script
parallel. I turned this:
foreach (dir; dirs)

into this:
foreach (dir; taskPool.parallel(dirs, 1))

And added other small cosmetic changes, but the above is the only real change.

Here's my timings:
Serial build: 1min, 3sec
Parallel build: 22sec
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 6/20/11 11:14 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 This is a translation project of Charles Petzold's Programming Windows
 (5th edition) book code samples.

 Currently over 120 code samples have been translated into D, with only
 a few modules remaining.

 Everything else you need to know is in the Readme file:
 https://github.com/AndrejMitrovic/DWindowsProgramming

 The examples were tested on fresh installs of XP and Win7 with the
 only dependency being DMD v2.053 and an NT operating system. I hope
 everyone will be able to build these examples without too much
 trouble. *crosses fingers*

Now on reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/i5m0c/petzolds_windows_programming_5th_ed_code_samples/ Andrei
Jun 21 2011
parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 6/21/11 4:28 PM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 On 6/20/11 11:14 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 This is a translation project of Charles Petzold's Programming Windows
 (5th edition) book code samples.

 Currently over 120 code samples have been translated into D, with only
 a few modules remaining.

 Everything else you need to know is in the Readme file:
 https://github.com/AndrejMitrovic/DWindowsProgramming

 The examples were tested on fresh installs of XP and Win7 with the
 only dependency being DMD v2.053 and an NT operating system. I hope
 everyone will be able to build these examples without too much
 trouble. *crosses fingers*

Now on reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/i5m0c/petzolds_windows_programming_5th_ed_code_samples/

And now approved. Andrei
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Daniel Gibson <metalcaedes gmail.com> writes:
Am 21.06.2011 06:14, schrieb Andrej Mitrovic:
 This is a translation project of Charles Petzold's Programming Windows
 (5th edition) book code samples.
 
 Currently over 120 code samples have been translated into D, with only
 a few modules remaining.
 
 Everything else you need to know is in the Readme file:
 https://github.com/AndrejMitrovic/DWindowsProgramming
 
 The examples were tested on fresh installs of XP and Win7 with the
 only dependency being DMD v2.053 and an NT operating system. I hope
 everyone will be able to build these examples without too much
 trouble. *crosses fingers*

The README mentions 2.043 instead of 2.053. Cheers, - Daniel
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Daniel Gibson <metalcaedes gmail.com> wrote:
 The README mentions 2.043 instead of 2.053.

Fixed, thanks.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Brad Roberts <braddr puremagic.com> wrote:
 Fixed in 2.053.  See also bug 4833.

Well that's odd because the script still generates map files in the root directory of the script file even though I'm using -od and -of, and I'm using 2.053. I've added a cleanup call after each sample is built so every map file is deleted from the root dir.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
Wait, I'm using 2.054 from github. This might be a regression. I'll investigate.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
No I've tested with 2.053 and it still generates a map file. I'll
reopen that report.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Jimmy Cao <jcao219 gmail.com> writes:
--0016e64f800090039204a63fd000
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

On Tue, Jun 21, 2011 at 4:29 PM, Trass3r <un known.com> wrote:

 Am 21.06.2011, 20:32 Uhr, schrieb Andrej Mitrovic <
 andrej.mitrovich gmail.com>:

  I don't know whether it is planned to incorporate the WinAPI bindings
 into Phobos/Druntime, there's at least 2.5 megs of code in prototypes
 and I'm not sure about the license (it's based on the MinGW headers).

That is indeed long overdue!

I feel like I cannot express how immensely helpful such an addition would be. --0016e64f800090039204a63fd000 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable On Tue, Jun 21, 2011 at 4:29 PM, Trass3r <span dir=3D"ltr">&lt;<a href=3D"m= ailto:un known.com">un known.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class=3D"gma= il_quote"><blockquote class=3D"gmail_quote" style=3D"margin:0 0 0 .8ex;bord= er-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"> Am 21.06.2011, 20:32 Uhr, schrieb Andrej Mitrovic &lt;<a href=3D"mailto:and= rej.mitrovich gmail.com" target=3D"_blank">andrej.mitrovich gmail.com</a>&g= t;:<div class=3D"im"><br> <blockquote class=3D"gmail_quote" style=3D"margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1p= x #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"> I don&#39;t know whether it is planned to incorporate the WinAPI bindings<b= r> into Phobos/Druntime, there&#39;s at least 2.5 megs of code in prototypes<b= r> and I&#39;m not sure about the license (it&#39;s based on the MinGW headers= ).<br> </blockquote> <br></div> That is indeed long overdue!<br> </blockquote></div><br><div>I feel like I cannot express how immensely help= ful such an addition would be.</div> --0016e64f800090039204a63fd000--
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Robert Clipsham <robert octarineparrot.com> wrote:
 I use D as a build script for my project too, it's awesome how easy it
 is to make the build parallel, and how much compilation time it saves!

Yeah, true words right there. RDMD is what makes everything run so smooth, it feels like coding in Python.
 Side note: parallel() works as an alias for taskPool.parallel, saves you
 some characters and looks nicer!

Right you are. Fixed! I can't believe how easy it is to just fix and push something online. It's quite exciting.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
Ok I've made most of the examples unicode safe now by using
std.utf.count instead of .length. The changesets are online.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/21/11, Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> wrote:
 On 6/21/11, Jonathan M Davis <jmdavisProg gmx.com> wrote:
 stride isn't a UTF version of strlen.

Brain misshap, I meant std.utf.count.

Double brain misshap. I wasn't looking for code-point count of a D string, but of a zero-terminated wchar*.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/22/11, Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> wrote:
 I think there's a misunderstanding somewhere. strlen() works just fine on
 UTF-8
 code.

I need a UTF16 strlen function for wchar*.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
On 6/22/11, Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> wrote:
 On 6/21/2011 5:41 PM, Andrej Mitrovic wrote:
 I need a UTF16 strlen function for wchar*.

wcslen()

You, sir, are a gentleman and a scholar.
Jun 21 2011
prev sibling parent Andrej Mitrovic <andrej.mitrovich gmail.com> writes:
Now on YC too: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2681216
Jun 21 2011