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digitalmars.D.announce - Moving forward with work on the D language and foundation

reply "Andrei Alexandrescu" <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
Hello everyone,


Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
and nine months.

Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time has 
come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. As 
sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
excited many times over about the great challenges and 
opportunities going forward.

Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get the 
foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told there 
are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum posted 
about progress.

I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation already 
has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' royalties to 
it. I encourage others to respond in kind.


Thanks,

Andrei
Aug 24 2015
next sibling parent Rory McGuire via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
That is fricken' awesome. Interesting times ahead, for you, and for us as a
community.

On Mon, Aug 24, 2015 at 8:42 PM, Andrei Alexandrescu via
Digitalmars-d-announce <digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:

 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language and
 foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part ways with
 Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I am
 grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time has come for me,
 however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. As sorry I am for leaving a
 good and secure career behind, I am excited many times over about the great
 challenges and opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with the
 foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get the foundation in
 motion as soon as possible, though I'm told there are numerous steps to
 complete. I will keep this forum posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation already has a
 donor - I have decided to contribute my books' royalties to it. I encourage
 others to respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Joseph Cassman" <jc7919 outlook.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Respect. Joseph
Aug 24 2015
next sibling parent Bill Baxter via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Mon, Aug 24, 2015 at 12:14 PM, Joseph Cassman via Digitalmars-d-announce
<digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:

 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:

 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language and
 foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part ways with
 Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.

 [...]
Respect.
Indeed. To you and especially to your wife. --bb
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling parent reply "rsw0x" <anonymous anonymous.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 19:14:46 UTC, Joseph Cassman wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Respect. Joseph
+1. Andrei is a major reason I decided to use D in the first place, his presence in the C++ community was very influential. Seeing him personally put a large portion of his life aside to push D forward is very reassuring that D is not on the way out.
Aug 24 2015
parent "shannon mackey" <refaQtor gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 22:04:58 UTC, rsw0x wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 19:14:46 UTC, Joseph Cassman wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 Hello everyone,
 [...]
 +1.

 Andrei is a major reason I decided to use D in the first place, 
 his presence in the C++ community was very influential. Seeing 
 him personally put a large portion of his life aside to push D 
 forward is very reassuring that D is not on the way out.
++1! ditto
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "tired_eyes" <pastuhov85 gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:


This is purely awesome! What else to say?
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "ponce" <contact gam3sfrommars.fr> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. 
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.
Great news!
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Israel" <tl12000 live.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
Wow, thats great to hear! But also saddening at the same time to hear youre leaving facebook :/...
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "CraigDillabaugh" <craig.dillabaugh gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. 
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get 
 the foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told 
 there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum 
 posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation 
 already has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' 
 royalties to it. I encourage others to respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
As many others have said, I respect your courageous decision to leave a secure job at Facebook. Very best of luck with your move to the D Language Foundation. It has been a very exciting week for the D language.
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Tourist" <gravatar gravatar.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. 
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get 
 the foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told 
 there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum 
 posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation 
 already has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' 
 royalties to it. I encourage others to respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
Hi Andrei, I don't know you in person, but you are my role model. You have made a choice which is not simple, but I'm sure it is the right choice, and I wish you to succeed with D, and with everything else you're after.
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 8/24/2015 11:42 AM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language and
 foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part ways with
 Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I am grateful to
 have been a part of it for this long. The time has come for me, however, to
 fully focus on pushing D forward. As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure
 career behind, I am excited many times over about the great challenges and
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with the foundation's
 prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get the foundation in motion as soon
as
 possible, though I'm told there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep
this
 forum posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation already has a donor -
I
 have decided to contribute my books' royalties to it. I encourage others to
 respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
Yay!
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent Rikki Cattermole <alphaglosined gmail.com> writes:
On 25/08/15 6:42 AM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language and
 foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part ways
 with Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I am
 grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time has come for
 me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. As sorry I am for
 leaving a good and secure career behind, I am excited many times over
 about the great challenges and opportunities going forward.
Oh well, I hope we have somebody else on the inside :/ But I do appreciate that sacrifice.
 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with the
 foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get the foundation
 in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told there are numerous steps
 to complete. I will keep this forum posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation already has a
 donor - I have decided to contribute my books' royalties to it. I
 encourage others to respond in kind.
I would love to do the same. But I need the money currently. If you get leanpub to accept the foundation as a charity once it is setup, I'll do a split share :)
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Joakim" <dlang joakim.fea.st> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward.
Can you elaborate on how you plan to push D forward, other than forming the foundation sooner?
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.
Sorry to hear the two couldn't coincide, but I doubt you will regret this move.
 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get 
 the foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told 
 there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum 
 posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation 
 already has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' 
 royalties to it. I encourage others to respond in kind.
Is there some way we can slap TDPL online in a more accessible format, like a paid blog of some sort if you'd like to keep it generating royalties? Print and pdfs are such antiquated formats, we can do much better.
Aug 24 2015
next sibling parent "Andrei Alexandrescu" <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 04:32:06 UTC, Joakim wrote:
 Can you elaborate on how you plan to push D forward, other than 
 forming the foundation sooner?
The obvious and most important way is to write code. This will enable me to tackle larger coding tasks such as the collections library. But there are many other tasks that need doing such as community leadership, language definition, writing articles, and more.
 Is there some way we can slap TDPL online in a more accessible 
 format, like a paid blog of some sort if you'd like to keep it 
 generating royalties?  Print and pdfs are such antiquated 
 formats, we can do much better.
I will ask. Andrei
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling parent "bachmeier" <no spam.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 04:32:06 UTC, Joakim wrote:

 Is there some way we can slap TDPL online in a more accessible 
 format, like a paid blog of some sort if you'd like to keep it 
 generating royalties?  Print and pdfs are such antiquated 
 formats, we can do much better.
How about something like this. Package the D compiler plus dub and TDPL together and sell it for $99. Then those of us using it for work-related purposes can ask our employers to purchase it for us.
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent =?UTF-8?Q?S=c3=b6nke_Ludwig?= <sludwig rejectedsoftware.com> writes:
Am 24.08.2015 um 20:42 schrieb Andrei Alexandrescu:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language and
 foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part ways
 with Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.
 (...)
That's great news! I really hope that this will generate enough momentum for the language to finally take off to greater heights. My best wishes for this upcoming endeavor!
Aug 24 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQi?= writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward.
This is great news for D!
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent =?iso-8859-1?Q?Robert_M._M=FCnch?= <robert.muench saphirion.com> writes:
On 2015-08-24 18:42:59 +0000, Andrei Alexandrescu said:

 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language 
 and foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part 
 ways with Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.
Wow, that takes cojones and your engagement will help a lot fo push D forward. Great news!! Let's come up with something that a lot small companies can support too. -- Robert M. Münch http://www.saphirion.com smarter | better | faster
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp progtools.org> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. 
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get 
 the foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told 
 there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum 
 posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation 
 already has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' 
 royalties to it. I encourage others to respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
Good luck for this new step on your career and also for the D community. Although I have now other focus, this community is great and even as a bystander it would be nice to see D flourish as mainstream language and safer system programming practices. Good luck, Paulo
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Muahmmad Adel" <devadel gmail.com> writes:
As far as I know, your title at Facebook was "D evangelist".  
When I knew that you moved to Facebook with this title, at first 
I thought that Facebook was willing to push D forward, with the 
company's resources and its previous contributions to technology, 
I thought this would be a similar but a more larger step.

So now I am curious to know details about how you see your work 
at Facebook conflicting with the way you want to push D forward. 
For example, Is the company only willing to support D to a 
limited level? Doesn't the language fulfil the company's 
technical needs? Do you have conflicting visions towards how 
things should proceed?

I know this is a question that you cannot give a totally 
politically correct answer to, but some details would be 
informative about your vision and / or the company.
Aug 25 2015
parent "Andrei Alexandrescu" <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 07:49:14 UTC, Muahmmad Adel wrote:
 As far as I know, your title at Facebook was "D evangelist".  
 When I knew that you moved to Facebook with this title, at 
 first I thought that Facebook was willing to push D forward, 
 with the company's resources and its previous contributions to 
 technology, I thought this would be a similar but a more larger 
 step.
I jokingly self-appointed myself with that title for a short while; Facebook is flexible enough to allow such. My official title there has always been Research Scientist and I've worked on a great deal of varied projects.
 So now I am curious to know details about how you see your work 
 at Facebook conflicting with the way you want to push D 
 forward. For example, Is the company only willing to support D 
 to a limited level? Doesn't the language fulfil the company's 
 technical needs? Do you have conflicting visions towards how 
 things should proceed?

 I know this is a question that you cannot give a totally 
 politically correct answer to, but some details would be 
 informative about your vision and / or the company.
There's not much to tell. Facebook is and continues to be a D user, the last project I was working on (and is ongoing) uses D, and there's more use in smaller internal projects. But there is no stronger involvement for the time being. Andrei
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "HaraldZealot" <harald_zealot tut.by> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 ...

 Thanks,

 Andrei
It is great!!!
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "wobbles" <grogan.colin gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Congrats - Big and difficult decision to come to I'm sure!
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Dejan Lekic" <dejan.lekic gmail.com> writes:
Well, Andrei, I expected this. - This is the best, and the most 
natural way forward. I am 100% The D Foundation is the best 
direction for D and only good will come from that. You and 
Facebook can still cooperate in many ways, and perhaps Facebook 
could become one of the important sponsors, or even foundation 
members, or just simply foundation partners. Possibilities are 
endless.

DDev Ltd. (my company) will support the D foundation. The "D" in 
its name is not just because my name starts with it, but also 
indicates close relation to the D programming language.

Anyway, I am really happy to see this, and I hope soon we will 
see a more serious approach to D development similar to Java's 
JSRs.

Kind regards, and all the best!
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Joseph Rushton Wakeling" <joseph.wakeling webdrake.net> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,

 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.
Wow, that's some news :-) Congratulations and much admiration and gratitude for taking such a big step on our behalf.
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent Martin Nowak <code+news.digitalmars dawg.eu> writes:
On 08/24/2015 08:42 PM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 Hello everyone,
 
 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language and
 foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part ways
 with Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.
Thank you for this very respectable decision. Let's all work on making this a great decision. -Martin
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
Wow! I doff my hat. Please let us know how we can contribute 
(donations and otherwise) asap.
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Saurabh Das" <saurabh.das gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. 
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get 
 the foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told 
 there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum 
 posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation 
 already has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' 
 royalties to it. I encourage others to respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
 [...]
Wow! Full respect to you Andrei. You are a real role model to this community and developers everywhere. Indeed reading your books on C++ is the reason I started using Dlang and it's clear that you and Walter are going to ensure a long and bright future for the language and the community.
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> writes:
On 24-Aug-2015 21:42, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D language and
 foundation, I have recently made the difficult decision to part ways
 with Facebook, my employer of five years and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I am
 grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time has come for
 me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. As sorry I am for
 leaving a good and secure career behind, I am excited many times over
 about the great challenges and opportunities going forward.
Thank you for making this tough choice for all of us. Combined with the recent DDMD announcement this weeks turns out to be a huge milestone for the D community. It's sure getting only more exciting in the D world from now on. -- Dmitry Olshansky
Aug 25 2015
parent reply Daniel =?UTF-8?B?S296w6Fr?= via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
V Tue, 25 Aug 2015 20:30:23 +0300
Dmitry Olshansky via Digitalmars-d-announce
<digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> napsáno:

 On 24-Aug-2015 21:42, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years and
 nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I am
 grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time has come
 for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. As sorry I am
 for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am excited many
 times over about the great challenges and opportunities going
 forward.
Thank you for making this tough choice for all of us. Combined with the recent DDMD announcement this weeks turns out to be a huge milestone for the D community. It's sure getting only more exciting in the D world from now on.
I can't agree more. OK maybe I would add this https://twitter.com/kozzi11/status/636190895856091136 ;-)
Aug 25 2015
parent reply "bachmeier" <no spam.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 19:29:06 UTC, Daniel Kozák wrote:

 I can't agree more. OK maybe I would add this 
 https://twitter.com/kozzi11/status/636190895856091136 ;-)
This is a big recent development for many: https://github.com/DlangScience
Aug 25 2015
parent reply Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> writes:
On 25-Aug-2015 23:04, bachmeier wrote:
 On Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 19:29:06 UTC, Daniel Kozák wrote:

 I can't agree more. OK maybe I would add this
 https://twitter.com/kozzi11/status/636190895856091136 ;-)
This is a big recent development for many: https://github.com/DlangScience
I just hope our math experts will join this organization even if only to bump the numbers. Seeing a one-man shop for D science is kinda disappointing. -- Dmitry Olshansky
Aug 25 2015
parent reply "John Colvin" <john.loughran.colvin gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 26 August 2015 at 05:51:06 UTC, Dmitry Olshansky 
wrote:
 On 25-Aug-2015 23:04, bachmeier wrote:
 On Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 19:29:06 UTC, Daniel Kozák wrote:

 I can't agree more. OK maybe I would add this
 https://twitter.com/kozzi11/status/636190895856091136 ;-)
This is a big recent development for many: https://github.com/DlangScience
I just hope our math experts will join this organization even if only to bump the numbers. Seeing a one-man shop for D science is kinda disappointing.
Not a one man shop. Ilya Yaroshenko is helping a lot, Lars T Kyllingstad is on board (along with SciD) and there are many others who are getting involved in some way. Anyone else who's interested should come to https://gitter.im/DlangScience/public and get involved in the conversation there.
Aug 26 2015
next sibling parent reply Russel Winder via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Wed, 2015-08-26 at 09:20 +0000, John Colvin via Digitalmars-d
-announce wrote:
=20
[=E2=80=A6]
 Not a one man shop. Ilya Yaroshenko is helping a lot, Lars T=20
 Kyllingstad is on board (along with SciD) and there are many=20
 others who are getting involved in some way.
=20
 Anyone else who's interested should come to=20
 https://gitter.im/DlangScience/public and get involved in the=20
 conversation there.
Even just for marketing reasons, it would be better if the DlangScience team on GitHub was more than one person. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Aug 26 2015
parent "John Colvin" <john.loughran.colvin gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 26 August 2015 at 15:48:49 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 Even just for marketing reasons, it would be better if the 
 DlangScience team on GitHub was more than one person.
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 04:32:21 UTC, Dmitry Olshansky wrote:
 All of you guys should be displayed here on the right:
 https://github.com/DlangScience

 Else it's a very bad marketing.
Message received.
Aug 27 2015
prev sibling parent Dmitry Olshansky <dmitry.olsh gmail.com> writes:
On 26-Aug-2015 12:20, John Colvin wrote:
 On Wednesday, 26 August 2015 at 05:51:06 UTC, Dmitry Olshansky wrote:
 On 25-Aug-2015 23:04, bachmeier wrote:
 On Tuesday, 25 August 2015 at 19:29:06 UTC, Daniel Kozák wrote:

 I can't agree more. OK maybe I would add this
 https://twitter.com/kozzi11/status/636190895856091136 ;-)
This is a big recent development for many: https://github.com/DlangScience
I just hope our math experts will join this organization even if only to bump the numbers. Seeing a one-man shop for D science is kinda disappointing.
Not a one man shop. Ilya Yaroshenko is helping a lot, Lars T Kyllingstad is on board (along with SciD) and there are many others who are getting involved in some way. Anyone else who's interested should come to https://gitter.im/DlangScience/public and get involved in the conversation there.
All of you guys should be displayed here on the right: https://github.com/DlangScience Else it's a very bad marketing. -- Dmitry Olshansky
Aug 26 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "welkam" <wwwelkam gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
to fully focus on pushing D forward.
<insert dick joke here>
Aug 25 2015
parent Bill Baxter via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Tue, Aug 25, 2015 at 6:06 PM, welkam via Digitalmars-d-announce <
digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:

 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:

 to fully focus on pushing D forward.
<insert dick joke here>
That would be pushing ===D forward.
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "rom" <monfollet.romain hotmail.fr> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Great news for D, this is a brave decision. I hope it'll push the language ahead. Congratulations
Aug 25 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent =?UTF-8?B?IlRow6lv?= Bueno" <munrek gmx.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone [...]
Wow.
Aug 27 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Jonathan M Davis via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Monday, August 24, 2015 18:42:59 Andrei Alexandrescu via
Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time has
 come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. As
 sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am
 excited many times over about the great challenges and
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get the
 foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told there
 are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum posted
 about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation already
 has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' royalties to
 it. I encourage others to respond in kind.
Wow. Sounds financially risky on your part, but if you can afford to do this, then it'll be great for the D community at large. The more resources we can have focused on D, the better. - Jonathan M Davis
Aug 27 2015
parent reply Shriramana Sharma <samjnaa_dont_spam_me gmail.com> writes:
Respect to Andrei for his decision, and I pray that his good intentions are 
sufficiently rewarded.

Jonathan M Davis via Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:

 Wow. Sounds financially risky on your part, but if you can afford to do
 this, then it'll be great for the D community at large. The more resources
 we can have focused on D, the better.
Hopefully companies which are interested in leveraging D's performance/syntax combination will consult with the Foundation and so the finances (both the Foundation's and thereby Andrei's) will be taken care of. The Python foundation seems to have done that nicely for Python. While I'm still "getting my D-legs" (< https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sea_legs) I do think D is the right way to combine Python-like high level syntax and C/C++-level power. I tried Cython but somehow it didn't click for me. And as for Go and Rust and all those other contenders, naah... [Is it even possible to write a Go/Rust compiler in Go/Rust? Or have they tried?] Of course, all this is made possible by the great D community, the "Demos" (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/demos#Latin). [Sorry, somehow I'm in the dictionary/alliteration mood ;-)] Shriramana Sharma.
Oct 11 2015
parent reply Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= writes:
On Monday, 12 October 2015 at 06:07:16 UTC, Shriramana Sharma 
wrote:
 naah... [Is it even possible to write a Go/Rust compiler in 
 Go/Rust? Or have they tried?]
Go is implemented in Go. Rust is implemented in Rust + C++.
Oct 11 2015
parent reply Iain Buclaw via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On 12 October 2015 at 08:32, Ola Fosheim Grøstad via
Digitalmars-d-announce <digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:
 On Monday, 12 October 2015 at 06:07:16 UTC, Shriramana Sharma wrote:
 naah... [Is it even possible to write a Go/Rust compiler in Go/Rust? Or
 have they tried?]
Go is implemented in Go.
Maybe I missed something, but at last check, Go and most of it's internal runtime is written in C++ (gccgo). They have an "upstream" somewhere, so I'd imagine that is C++ too.
Oct 12 2015
next sibling parent reply Gary Willoughby <dev nomad.so> writes:
On Monday, 12 October 2015 at 18:25:57 UTC, Iain Buclaw wrote:
 Maybe I missed something, but at last check, Go and most of 
 it's internal runtime is written in C++ (gccgo).  They have an 
 "upstream" somewhere, so I'd imagine that is C++ too.
The last release saw the compiler and runtime ported to Go. https://golang.org/doc/go1.5
Oct 12 2015
parent Iain Buclaw via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On 12 October 2015 at 20:30, Gary Willoughby via
Digitalmars-d-announce <digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:
 On Monday, 12 October 2015 at 18:25:57 UTC, Iain Buclaw wrote:
 Maybe I missed something, but at last check, Go and most of it's internal
 runtime is written in C++ (gccgo).  They have an "upstream" somewhere, so
 I'd imagine that is C++ too.
The last release saw the compiler and runtime ported to Go. https://golang.org/doc/go1.5
Either gccgo will continue to be C++ (not C) or they never shared a common codebase, ever. https://go.googlesource.com/gofrontend/ https://gcc.gnu.org/git/?p=gcc.git;a=tree;f=gcc/go/gofrontend;hb=HEAD I reckon it's the latter. What a joy to have competing implementations. (Well, at least they are maintained in the same camp unlike... :-)
Oct 12 2015
prev sibling parent Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= writes:
On Monday, 12 October 2015 at 18:25:57 UTC, Iain Buclaw wrote:
 On 12 October 2015 at 08:32, Ola Fosheim Grøstad via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce <digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> 
 wrote:
 On Monday, 12 October 2015 at 06:07:16 UTC, Shriramana Sharma 
 wrote:
 naah... [Is it even possible to write a Go/Rust compiler in 
 Go/Rust? Or have they tried?]
Go is implemented in Go.
Maybe I missed something, but at last check, Go and most of it's internal runtime is written in C++ (gccgo). They have an "upstream" somewhere, so I'd imagine that is C++ too.
https://golang.org/doc/go1.5 «The compiler and runtime are now written entirely in Go (with a little assembler). C is no longer involved in the implementation, and so the C compiler that was once necessary for building the distribution is gone.»
Oct 12 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent Bruno Medeiros <bruno.do.medeiros+dng gmail.com> writes:
On 24/08/2015 19:42, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation already has a
 donor - I have decided to contribute my books' royalties to it. I
 encourage others to respond in kind.
Cool, I'd be up for contributing in this way. Any thoughts on how that would work though? One off Paypal donations, or a recurring system like Patreon or BountySource's Salt? (https://salt.bountysource.com/) -- Bruno Medeiros https://twitter.com/brunodomedeiros
Aug 27 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "BBasile" <bb.temp gmx.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. 
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get 
 the foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told 
 there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum 
 posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation 
 already has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' 
 royalties to it. I encourage others to respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Aug 27 2015
next sibling parent reply "Colin" <grogan.colin gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
Aug 27 2015
next sibling parent reply "BBasile" <bb.temp gmx.com> writes:
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 18:03:37 UTC, Colin wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
And Walter who was involved in the 80's in the team who made MS DOS... do you think he's 20 yo ?
Aug 27 2015
next sibling parent reply Andrej Mitrovic via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On 8/27/15, BBasile via Digitalmars-d-announce
<digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 18:03:37 UTC, Colin wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu
 wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
And Walter who was involved in the 80's in the team who made MS DOS... do you think he's 20 yo ?
Hmm.. ? This is the first time I've heard of this. He's one of the very first people who have developed a C++ compiler, but MS-DOS?
Aug 27 2015
parent "BBasile" <bb.temp gmx.com> writes:
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 20:29:49 UTC, Andrej Mitrovic 
wrote:
 On 8/27/15, BBasile via Digitalmars-d-announce 
 <digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 18:03:37 UTC, Colin wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei 
 Alexandrescu wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
And Walter who was involved in the 80's in the team who made MS DOS... do you think he's 20 yo ?
Hmm.. ? This is the first time I've heard of this. He's one of the very first people who have developed a C++ compiler, but MS-DOS?
Right, this is an error. The day i've read his bio here http://www.drdobbs.com/architecture-and-design/how-i-came-to-write-d/240165322 I should be very **tired**. "I found myself part of a programming team developing software for MS-DOS". This is the origin of the error. Sorry I didn't mean to spread bullshits...
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling parent "Colin" <grogan.colin gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 18:42:41 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 18:03:37 UTC, Colin wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei 
 Alexandrescu wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
And Walter who was involved in the 80's in the team who made MS DOS... do you think he's 20 yo ?
We were talkin' bout Andrei yo, not Walter!
Aug 27 2015
prev sibling parent reply Steven Schveighoffer <schveiguy yahoo.com> writes:
On 8/27/15 2:03 PM, Colin wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
He ain't that old :) http://erdani.com/index.php/about/ "Born in 1969" -Steve
Aug 27 2015
next sibling parent "BBasile" <bb.temp gmx.com> writes:
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 20:52:42 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
wrote:
 On 8/27/15 2:03 PM, Colin wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei 
 Alexandrescu wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
He ain't that old :) http://erdani.com/index.php/about/ "Born in 1969" -Steve
Sorry, for some reason this is not the best of me i'm showing tonigth...Maybe it'll be better when talking about a PR or anything else...See ya later.
Aug 27 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 20:52:42 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
wrote:
 On 8/27/15 2:03 PM, Colin wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei 
 Alexandrescu wrote:
 [...]
That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
Andrei is past 50? Doesn't look it!
He ain't that old :) http://erdani.com/index.php/about/ "Born in 1969" -Steve
Who said you have to be in your twenties to rock 'n' roll? Look at J.J. Cale, he was in his thirties when he became famous and he said he could avoid many mistakes people make when they're young and foolish. After all, that's what D is about, mature but not complacent.
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling parent Russel Winder via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:52 -0400, Steven Schveighoffer via Digitalmars-d-
announce wrote:
=20
[=E2=80=A6]
 He ain't that old :)
=20
 http://erdani.com/index.php/about/
=20
 "Born in 1969"
A youngster then. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t:+44 20 7585 2200 voip:sip: russel.winder ekiga.net 41 Buckmaster Road m:+44 7770 465 077 xmpp:russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype:russel_winder
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Russel Winder via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via Digitalmars-d-announce wrote=
:
 [=E2=80=A6]
=20
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different=20
 culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA,=20
 past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try something new.=20
 Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t:+44 20 7585 2200 voip:sip: russel.winder ekiga.net 41 Buckmaster Road m:+44 7770 465 077 xmpp:russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype:russel_winder
Aug 28 2015
next sibling parent reply "Chris" <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 12:28:43 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 […]
 
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different 
 culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in 
 USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try 
 something new. Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything.
I agree (I think it's the first time I agree with you!). Age is a state of mind. I've seen people in their 20ies who only think about a pension plan and watch TV every evening until they fall asleep. The thing is that in Europe people are not "lazier", it's just harder to get going. You are fighting against structures that have been there since the Middle Ages (or longer). I don't know about the US, but in the "New World" (we stole from the inhabitants for whom it was an old world) there are indeed more possibilities. In Europe they regulate the ordinary citizen to death, often it's not worth the hassle.
Aug 28 2015
next sibling parent reply Russel Winder via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Fri, 2015-08-28 at 13:08 +0000, Chris via Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
=20
[=E2=80=A6]
 I agree (I think it's the first time I agree with you!). Age is a=20
 state of mind. I've seen people in their 20ies who only think=20
 about a pension plan and watch TV every evening until they fall=20
 asleep.
Maybe we should get back to disagreeing, but only after this bit of this thread. :-)
 The thing is that in Europe people are not "lazier", it's just=20
 harder to get going. You are fighting against structures that=20
 have been there since the Middle Ages (or longer). I don't know=20
 about the US, but in the "New World" (we stole from the=20
 inhabitants for whom it was an old world) there are indeed more=20
 possibilities. In Europe they regulate the ordinary citizen to=20
 death, often it's not worth the hassle.
There no doubt that there is a difference in society and business USA compared to Europe: at least in Western Europe there is a fundamental commonality in the extant business culture. Yes, the European way is a consequence of the history, as indeed is the USA culture. There is no doubt that (at least until Big Money took over most, if not all, startup funding in "The Valley") there was a much more vibrant startup culture in the USA than in the UK (I cannot speak for the rest of Europe). Although the tax system hinders startups in the UK, there is an increasing startup culture in the IT industry, at least in London, as people continue to find the various little pots of money (which have been around for years and funded most of my 2000-2004 venture). The problem is that the big corporates see activity and then move to stiffle it. In Shoreditch, the corporates moved into startup area, the rents shot up and so you either use the Google incubator or go elsewhere. Effectively Shoreditch startup activity has been killed off. I am hopeful Elephant & Castle or Borough become the new Shorditch. Startup still happen, but it is now really to create the technology to be bought by a corporate before sales, so for small value. Serial entrepreneurism is the thing now. I suspect "The Valley" is now like this: the opportunities for a new Microsoft or Google are much smaller, at least until there is a new disruptive technology a la Facebook. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t:+44 20 7585 2200 voip:sip: russel.winder ekiga.net 41 Buckmaster Road m:+44 7770 465 077 xmpp:russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype:russel_winder
Aug 28 2015
parent "wobbles" <grogan.colin gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 16:12:47 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Fri, 2015-08-28 at 13:08 +0000, Chris via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 
[…] Startup still happen, but it is now really to create the technology to be bought by a corporate before sales, so for small value. Serial entrepreneurism is the thing now. I suspect "The Valley" is now like this: the opportunities for a new Microsoft or Google are much smaller, at least until there is a new disruptive technology a la Facebook.
I find this quite interesting - the "Don't fall in love with your business" mentality is truly there. Maybe it's the romantic in me, but I like to think that if I do ever create a company, I'd like to be the one to run it into the ground, thank you very much!
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling parent reply Tony <tonytdominguez aol.com> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 13:08:36 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 12:28:43 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 […]
 
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different 
 culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in 
 USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try 
 something new. Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything.
I agree (I think it's the first time I agree with you!). Age is a state of mind. I've seen people in their 20ies who only think about a pension plan and watch TV every evening until they fall asleep.
But in general, people slow down mentally as they age. Most US companies - and Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook is leading the charge with his FWD.us lobby group - would prefer the government give them the capability to hire an unlimited amount of 25 year old foreign programmers instead of them having to hire 50 year old American programmers.
Dec 08 2015
parent reply Chris Wright <dhasenan gmail.com> writes:
On Wed, 09 Dec 2015 05:40:47 +0000, Tony wrote:

 On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 13:08:36 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 12:28:43 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via Digitalmars-d-announce
 wrote:
 […]
 
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different culture,
 past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in USA, past 50 yo
 some people still take the risk to try something new. Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything.
I agree (I think it's the first time I agree with you!). Age is a state of mind. I've seen people in their 20ies who only think about a pension plan and watch TV every evening until they fall asleep.
But in general, people slow down mentally as they age. Most US companies - and Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook is leading the charge with his FWD.us lobby group - would prefer the government give them the capability to hire an unlimited amount of 25 year old foreign programmers instead of them having to hire 50 year old American programmers.
25-year-old people are more likely to work unpaid overtime. They generally get lower salaries. They're less likely to have families, which means lower health insurance costs. They're less likely to think about retirement, which means companies can advertise 401k matching as a competitive benefit without having to pay as much. The assertion that people slow down mentally as they age is pretty vague. While senescence does have mental effects, that wouldn't be hitting significantly at the age of 50 unless you have early onset Alzheimer's or the like. If there are some other effects impacting productivity, there are benefits to an extra 25 years of experience.
Dec 08 2015
parent reply Tony <tonytdominguez aol.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 06:08:01 UTC, Chris Wright wrote:
 On Wed, 09 Dec 2015 05:40:47 +0000, Tony wrote:

 On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 13:08:36 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 12:28:43 UTC, Russel Winder 
 wrote:
 On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 […]
 
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a 
 different culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose 
 security, but in USA, past 50 yo some people still take the 
 risk to try something new. Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything.
I agree (I think it's the first time I agree with you!). Age is a state of mind. I've seen people in their 20ies who only think about a pension plan and watch TV every evening until they fall asleep.
But in general, people slow down mentally as they age. Most US companies - and Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook is leading the charge with his FWD.us lobby group - would prefer the government give them the capability to hire an unlimited amount of 25 year old foreign programmers instead of them having to hire 50 year old American programmers.
25-year-old people are more likely to work unpaid overtime. They generally get lower salaries. They're less likely to have families, which means lower health insurance costs. They're less likely to think about retirement, which means companies can advertise 401k matching as a competitive benefit without having to pay as much.
Companies have the option to offer 50 year olds the same salary they offer 25 year olds, and to not give them 401K plans and reduce or eliminate their medical benefits. The government would support that just as much as they currently support laying off 50 year olds to be replaced by 25 year old foreign non-citizen visa workers or hiring visa workers in lieu of American workers. But they choose not to because none of that changes the fact that the brains of 50 year olds are not as good as the brains of 25 year olds, in the same way that the muscles of 50 year olds are not as good as the muscles of 25 year olds. The two situations are not entirely identical in that acquired knowledge and experience can help to level out the brain side more than it does on the muscle side. But the field of programming is one of the worst, if not the worst, for having past job experience match current job prospects.
 The assertion that people slow down mentally as they age is 
 pretty vague. While senescence does have mental effects, that 
 wouldn't be hitting significantly at the age of 50 unless you 
 have early onset Alzheimer's or the like. If there are some 
 other effects impacting productivity, there are benefits to an 
 extra 25 years of experience.
One thing that comes to mind to refute the contention that senescence would be insignificant at the age of 50 is notable technical achievement. If we were to list the mathematical and scientific discoveries of the past - like calculus and theory of relativity, etc. - how many would have been done by someone at the age of 50 or older? How many milestones in computing history were achieved by someone 50 or older? How many were done by someone over 40? And I think most of the aging process isn't even quality (what would most impact notable discovery) - it's quantity (that is, slower clock cycle). And companies probably have more concerns about quantity of thought than quality.
Dec 08 2015
next sibling parent reply Rory McGuire via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Wed, Dec 9, 2015 at 9:12 AM, Tony via Digitalmars-d-announce <
digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:

 [snip]
 One thing that comes to mind to refute the contention that senescence
 would be insignificant at the age of 50 is notable technical achievement.

 If we were to list the mathematical and scientific discoveries of the past
 - like calculus and theory of relativity, etc. - how many would have been
 done by someone at the age of 50 or older? How many milestones in computing
 history were achieved by someone 50 or older? How many were done by someone
 over 40? And I think most of the aging process isn't even quality (what
 would most impact notable discovery) - it's quantity (that is, slower clock
 cycle). And companies probably have more concerns about quantity of thought
 than quality.
Lol not sure where you getting all this, but the average 25 year old is a dumb ass compared to the average 50 year old. However that being said the average 50 year old is a lot less likely to get excited about their work and to do something super creative / learning new things. These things are not based on their brain activity though, it has a lot more to do with social conditioning and disillusionment. There are a lot less 50 year olds that are motivated to something disruptive in their fields of experience. The number of scarily intelligent people aged over 60 is most likely a lot higher than the number of 25 year olds that are so. Its just the way our brains work, your brain optimises its thought processes continually, and experience is where you get that.
Dec 08 2015
next sibling parent Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 07:49:58 UTC, Rory McGuire wrote:
 The number of scarily intelligent people aged over 60 is most 
 likely a lot
 higher than the number of 25 year olds that are so. Its just 
 the way our
 brains work, your brain optimises its thought processes 
 continually, and
 experience is where you get that.
Indeed a very complex matter. In late teens we are probably quicker and learn more easily than later in life. After 25 I don't know how much slow down there has been, but as you get older you also can narrow down which trains of thought that are promising so you use your labour more efficiently. A 20 years old is going all over the place, a 50 years old will ask more questions of what is necessary to get the job done. Which is why the army only want youngsters (<25), older people would just ask too many legitimate questions about how the army is organized... In research the lack of direction of younger people can be an advantage in terms of finding new fields (e.g. looking in the not so promising areas) at the cost of higher failure rate. The Norwegian mathematician Abel probably did his findings due to not having an advisor to guide him all the way, so he was looking at math from his own angle. But finding new fields is just a very very small part of research, although it makes people famous. So yes, there are more famous young researchers, not because they are smarter, but because they are ignorant enough to walk into new terrain and probably also because they have something to prove before they get tenure. Besides, a lot of discoveries are the result of mistakes or misunderstandings. Young people make mistakes at a higher frequency. Often a bad thing, sometimes a good thing. Although very young people learn more efficiently, we also have to remember that learning is a skill too, so I think it matters more that one learns continuously and find better ways of learning as one gets older. People who keep their brain active can learn new languages at the age of 80, and in comparison even most teens have trouble learning a new language, yet 2 year olds learn languages like crazy! So, yeah, 2 year olds are much much better at learning than any other age group. Much better. Are they smarter, than the rest of us? On some metrics they probably are. They consider everything from a fresh angle. But older people can do that too, by training and techniques. Did I learn faster at the age of 18, than at the age of 40? Yes. Did I learn new technology faster at the age of 25 than at the age of 40? No, I think I learn faster now. Not because the brain is faster, but because I don't need to learn the basics as frequently. But I notice that it is more important to stay active (keep programming) as one gets older.
Dec 09 2015
prev sibling parent reply Tony <tonytdominguez aol.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 07:49:58 UTC, Rory McGuire wrote:
 On Wed, Dec 9, 2015 at 9:12 AM, Tony via Digitalmars-d-announce 
 < digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:

 [snip]
 One thing that comes to mind to refute the contention that 
 senescence
 would be insignificant at the age of 50 is notable technical 
 achievement.

 If we were to list the mathematical and scientific discoveries 
 of the past - like calculus and theory of relativity, etc. - 
 how many would have been done by someone at the age of 50 or 
 older? How many milestones in computing history were achieved 
 by someone 50 or older? How many were done by someone over 40? 
 And I think most of the aging process isn't even quality (what 
 would most impact notable discovery) - it's quantity (that is, 
 slower clock cycle). And companies probably have more concerns 
 about quantity of thought than quality.
Lol not sure where you getting all this, but the average 25 year old is a dumb ass compared to the average 50 year old. However that being said the average 50 year old is a lot less likely to get excited about their work and to do something super creative / learning new things. These things are not based on their brain activity though, it has a lot more to do with social conditioning and disillusionment. There are a lot less 50 year olds that are motivated to something disruptive in their fields of experience.
I'd be swayed if you could link to interviews with older scientists, mathematicians or computer scientists who said their work declined with age because they became disillusioned or they ran into social conditioning issues.
 The number of scarily intelligent people aged over 60 is most 
 likely a lot
 higher than the number of 25 year olds that are so. Its just 
 the way our
 brains work, your brain optimises its thought processes 
 continually, and
 experience is where you get that.
Rather than the two of us expressing opposing opinions and you loling, we should probably look at research on the matter. Unfortunately, there is some disagreement with regard to cognitive decline. Some see it as a gradual decline from early adulthood and others seeing the decline postponed until later in life. This paper titled "The myth of cognitive decline" https://mindmodeling.org/cogsci2013/papers/0230/paper0230.pdf actually appears to acknowledge and accept that speed of reasoning declines with age: "Findings from a range of psychometric tests suggest that the rates at which the mind processes information increase from infancy to young adulthood, and decline steadily thereafter (Salthouse, 2011). Increasing reaction times are a primary marker for age related cognitive decline (Deary et al, 2010), and are even considered its cause (Salthouse, 1996), yet they are puzzling." but then attributes it to the brain having to deal with more information rather than having a slower processing speed - a bloated registry, if you will. "However, age increases the rage of knowledge and skills individuals possess, which increase the overall amount of information processed in their cognitive systems. This extra processing has a cost." But an employer wouldn't care if an older worker was thinking slower because of physical decline or because they had to sift through more information.
Dec 09 2015
parent Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 10:26:03 UTC, Tony wrote:
 I'd be swayed if you could link to interviews with older 
 scientists, mathematicians or computer scientists who said 
 their work declined with age because they became disillusioned 
 or they ran into social conditioning issues.
They are bogged down with teaching and administration and are at that time specialized in an established field and follow the money (research grants which generally focus on what "society needs", i.e. what is established). Academia also focus on having a tally on publishing, which unfortunately does not breed depth, but breadth. When you do a master you can basically pick up any topic and give in to your own curiosity, most people follow the same area as their master when they move towards a ph.d. So you have a source of "curious noise" at the entry level, but after that there is gravity towards the established. In order to do something new you have to both be really really curious about something and also have the time to go all the way. As you master a field the curiosity probably drops. That said, most ph.d. reports are boring. Media propagates the fairy tales which are the result of that stochastic entry level. You never hear about the 99.9% boring results.
Dec 09 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply deadalnix <deadalnix gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 07:12:06 UTC, Tony wrote:
 One thing that comes to mind to refute the contention that 
 senescence would be insignificant at the age of 50 is notable 
 technical achievement.

 If we were to list the mathematical and scientific discoveries 
 of the past - like calculus and theory of relativity, etc. - 
 how many would have been done by someone at the age of 50 or 
 older? How many milestones in computing history were achieved 
 by someone 50 or older? How many were done by someone over 40? 
 And I think most of the aging process isn't even quality (what 
 would most impact notable discovery) - it's quantity (that is, 
 slower clock cycle). And companies probably have more concerns 
 about quantity of thought than quality.
There has been a significant prime number discovery made by a 50+ guy on prime number recently (on the spacing pattern between them). I can't recall his name. Alleged inventor of bitcoin is 44 years old. It is not 50+ but it is much closer than 25. Ivan Godard, behind the Mill is more than 60. I thin what you are looking at here is that youngster are more willing to take risk. When Einstein say that time is relative and ether doesn't exists, that mass and energy is that same thing and that energy exchange is quantized, he takes the risk of looking like a fool big time. But he has no reputation to loose, and he has no involvement in existing theories. Later in life, either you were not talented and most likely not made it, or you were talented and busy capitalizing and what you made younger. Later in his life, he is going to deny quatum physics, not because he has gone mad, but because the more you invest into something (relativity in his case) the harder it is to let go. That's due to cognitive dissonance.
Dec 09 2015
next sibling parent Rory McGuire via Digitalmars-d-announce writes:
On Wed, Dec 9, 2015 at 11:27 AM, deadalnix via Digitalmars-d-announce <
digitalmars-d-announce puremagic.com> wrote:

 On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 07:12:06 UTC, Tony wrote:

 One thing that comes to mind to refute the contention that senescence
 would be insignificant at the age of 50 is notable technical achievement.

 If we were to list the mathematical and scientific discoveries of the
 past - like calculus and theory of relativity, etc. - how many would have
 been done by someone at the age of 50 or older? How many milestones in
 computing history were achieved by someone 50 or older? How many were done
 by someone over 40? And I think most of the aging process isn't even
 quality (what would most impact notable discovery) - it's quantity (that
 is, slower clock cycle). And companies probably have more concerns about
 quantity of thought than quality.
There has been a significant prime number discovery made by a 50+ guy on prime number recently (on the spacing pattern between them). I can't recall his name. Alleged inventor of bitcoin is 44 years old. It is not 50+ but it is much closer than 25. Ivan Godard, behind the Mill is more than 60. I thin what you are looking at here is that youngster are more willing to take risk. When Einstein say that time is relative and ether doesn't exists, that mass and energy is that same thing and that energy exchange is quantized, he takes the risk of looking like a fool big time. But he has no reputation to loose, and he has no involvement in existing theories. Later in life, either you were not talented and most likely not made it, or you were talented and busy capitalizing and what you made younger. Later in his life, he is going to deny quatum physics, not because he has gone mad, but because the more you invest into something (relativity in his case) the harder it is to let go. That's due to cognitive dissonance.
Yeah, its so frustrating that our emotions and concept of self drives our thoughts on any concept we contemplate. If we could blank slate our minds we would have nothing to process the concepts with either so that is no solution, best way is to contemplate many different concepts hoping to be able to process in a way that lacks prejudice. I often say to my wife that idealism and fanaticism are viruses of the mind because of this.
Dec 09 2015
prev sibling parent reply Tony <tonytdominguez aol.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 09:27:55 UTC, deadalnix wrote:


 I thin what you are looking at here is that youngster are more 
 willing to take risk. When Einstein say that time is relative 
 and ether doesn't exists, that mass and energy is that same 
 thing and that energy exchange is quantized, he takes the risk 
 of looking like a fool big time. But he has no reputation to 
 loose, and he has no involvement in existing theories.
Maybe in the field of physics, but is it possible to release things in mathematics or computer science that aren't proven at the time of their announcement?
 Later in life, either you were not talented and most likely not 
 made it, or you were talented and busy capitalizing and what 
 you made younger.
That's a very good point. Capitalizing or lacking equivalent motivation.
Dec 09 2015
parent reply Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 10:33:33 UTC, Tony wrote:
 On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 09:27:55 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 Later in life, either you were not talented and most likely 
 not made it, or you were talented and busy capitalizing and 
 what you made younger.
That's a very good point. Capitalizing or lacking equivalent motivation.
Actually it isn't. Capitalizing is to a large extent related to superficial aspects such as connections, appearance and playing by the rules. Although some people get famous for being different, they are in the small minority. But it makes better stories and headlines.
Dec 09 2015
parent reply Tony <tonytdominguez aol.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 10:44:35 UTC, Ola Fosheim 
Grøstad wrote:
 On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 10:33:33 UTC, Tony wrote:
 On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 09:27:55 UTC, deadalnix wrote:
 Later in life, either you were not talented and most likely 
 not made it, or you were talented and busy capitalizing and 
 what you made younger.
That's a very good point. Capitalizing or lacking equivalent motivation.
Actually it isn't. Capitalizing is to a large extent related to superficial aspects such as connections, appearance and playing by the rules. Although some people get famous for being different, they are in the small minority. But it makes better stories and headlines.
How are you defining "capitalizing"?
Dec 09 2015
next sibling parent Ola Fosheim =?UTF-8?B?R3LDuHN0YWQ=?= writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 11:04:46 UTC, Tony wrote:
 How are you defining "capitalizing"?
Climbing the ladder. Many researchers don't want to climb the ladder (e.g. become head of department or even group leader) because it means that they spend 100% of their time on administration and none on research. So you'll see effects like having the leadership being passed around or being the result of peer pressure. Many already have 50% teaching, then a lot of overhead for administration/supervision, so maybe the time left over for actual research is 40% + spare time. Take any kind of leadership role and the research time may be swallowed by "urgent issues". Some researchers are also very conscious and probably spend more than they should on teaching which further erode available time. Another issue is that on the entry level research is more individualistic, but higher up it pays off to be in the same area as you colleges and being part of a community. So there are many reasons for people with tenure to stick to a smaller research area that they know well, but the bottomline is that if you only have 3 months to produce a quality paper then you have to stay specialized. IMO, the most interesting papers are still published by experienced researchers, only in the rare cases are their early papers the most interesting.
Dec 09 2015
prev sibling parent deadalnix <deadalnix gmail.com> writes:
On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 11:04:46 UTC, Tony wrote:
 On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 10:44:35 UTC, Ola Fosheim 
 Grøstad wrote:
 On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 10:33:33 UTC, Tony wrote:
 On Wednesday, 9 December 2015 at 09:27:55 UTC, deadalnix 
 wrote:
 Later in life, either you were not talented and most likely 
 not made it, or you were talented and busy capitalizing and 
 what you made younger.
That's a very good point. Capitalizing or lacking equivalent motivation.
Actually it isn't. Capitalizing is to a large extent related to superficial aspects such as connections, appearance and playing by the rules. Although some people get famous for being different, they are in the small minority. But it makes better stories and headlines.
How are you defining "capitalizing"?
Once you made it big with something, you become a reference in that area. You can continue to work on it, producing various incremental improvement, polishing and so on. You gain influence on youngster and can have impact that way. You are usually in a respectable position. You also have a lot to loose. If you go into some stupid new project you can end up looking like a moron if it doesn't pan out, while, by doing nothing or keeping improving what made you big in the first place, you do just fine. Once you are amongst the top at something, why would you throw it all away to start something new ? Some will do it, but overall it is uncommon. On the other hand, incentive are just not the same for youngsters.
Dec 09 2015
prev sibling parent Chris Wright <dhasenan gmail.com> writes:
On Wed, 09 Dec 2015 07:12:06 +0000, Tony wrote:

 If we were to list the mathematical and scientific discoveries of the
 past - like calculus and theory of relativity, etc. - how many would
 have been done by someone at the age of 50 or older? How many milestones
 in computing history were achieved by someone 50 or older? How many were
 done by someone over 40? And I think most of the aging process isn't
 even quality (what would most impact notable discovery) - it's quantity
 (that is, slower clock cycle). And companies probably have more concerns
 about quantity of thought than quality.
Cole 1976 showed that there was scant difference in productivity for natural scientists at the age of 30 and at the age of 50 (measured in terms of the rate of citations of published papers). It looks like the younger ones produced more work and the older ones produced better work. Specifically for mathematics, Stern 1978 observes that the number of papers produced peaks before the age of 40, but citations per paper grow significantly, so that a mathematician at the age of 55 is likely to be cited as much as one at the age of 40 and significantly more than one below 35. So unless aging suddenly got much scarier in the past four decades -- but no, you're talking about people in history, which goes back a lot more than four decades. The availability heuristic is unreliable, but JPass is available for just $20 per month. http://www.jstor.org/stable/284859?seq=1 Of course, this does reinforce the decision to hire younger software engineers. The metrics are about lines of code per day or time to implement something with not a care about software defects, which favors younger developers over older ones.
Dec 09 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "BBasile" <basile.burg gmx.coml> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 12:28:43 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 […]
 
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different 
 culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in 
 USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try 
 something new. Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything.
Never mind the bollocks. :handshake:
Sep 12 2015
parent BBasile <basile.burg gmx.coml> writes:
On Saturday, 12 September 2015 at 22:28:49 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 12:28:43 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 […]
 
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different 
 culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in 
 USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try 
 something new. Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything.
Never mind the bollocks. :handshake:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKLpeNJ9zZo don't let your dishes just in front of your house.
Sep 12 2015
prev sibling parent BBasile <bb.temp gmx.com> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 12:28:43 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Thu, 2015-08-27 at 16:01 +0000, BBasile via 
 Digitalmars-d-announce wrote:
 […]
 
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different 
 culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in 
 USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try 
 something new. Awesome.
I say "bollocks" to your accusation that Europeans post 50 are a bunch of useless idiots. I call double "bollocks" on the claim that only in the USA do people do anything.
https://www.google.fr/maps/ 51.4602279,-0.1695423,3a,68.5y,2.82h,52.97t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1shQpIZlKwZL_k_IzgQSA-aw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1 I say that you could still sort your waste. Never mind the Bollocks.
Sep 12 2015
prev sibling parent reply "John" <john.joyus gmail.com> writes:
On Thursday, 27 August 2015 at 16:01:54 UTC, BBasile wrote:
 That's courageous, particularly past 50 yo. It's a different 
 culture, past 50 yo in Europe people choose security, but in 
 USA, past 50 yo some people still take the risk to try 
 something new. Awesome.
The lifespan has been steadily increasing. Andrew could work for another 50 years! That means he is very young right now and free to do anything he wants.
Aug 31 2015
parent "John" <john.joyus gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 31 August 2015 at 23:27:40 UTC, John wrote:
 The lifespan has been steadily increasing. Andrew could work 
 for another 50 years!
 That means he is very young right now and free to do anything 
 he wants.
Sorry for misspelling Andrei's name.
Aug 31 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Enamex" <enamex+d outlook.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,
 [...]
 Andrei
What big news! May you prosper and may the odds favor your (and our) dream, going forward.
Aug 27 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Shammah Chancellor" <shammah.chancellor gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Awesome. I wish I could join you. :) Maybe in time. How do we donate? Is there a mechanism to maybe do reoccurring donations via PayPal?
Aug 27 2015
parent reply "Laeeth Isharc" <Laeeth.nospam nospam-laeeth.com> writes:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
I hope you don't mind, but I guess it is public info now, and news has a greater impact when fresh: https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/3ioy9b/andrei_alexandrescu_c_guru_leaves_facebook_to/
Aug 27 2015
parent "Laeeth Isharc" <Laeeth.nospam nospam-laeeth.com> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 05:33:41 UTC, Laeeth Isharc wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five 
 years and nine months.

 [...]
I hope you don't mind, but I guess it is public info now, and news has a greater impact when fresh: https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/3ioy9b/andrei_alexandrescu_c_guru_leaves_facebook_tl
It's blowing up on reddit so please chip in to answer questions about the language if you have time.
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "ChangLong" <changlon gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,

 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.
 Andrei
You are precious asset for D community.
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Kingsley Eze" <null null.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Awesome!!!
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Nhale" <fuckyou gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
good luck focusing on the D.
Aug 28 2015
parent reply "bachmeier" <no spam.net> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 17:52:43 UTC, Nhale wrote:
 good luck focusing on the D.
downvote
Aug 28 2015
parent Nick Sabalausky <SeeWebsiteToContactMe semitwist.com> writes:
On 08/28/2015 02:59 PM, bachmeier wrote:
 On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 17:52:43 UTC, Nhale wrote:
 good luck focusing on the D.
downvote
"The D" jokes almost make me miss the "C++? You should be using A++! Durr hurr hurr" jokes from non-programmers who thought they were being original and clever. Almost.
Aug 29 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Emil" <emilper gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 I encourage others to respond in kind.
just make sure there is a way to make small recurring donations the way the Perl Foundation does and there will be others ... maybe not from royalties, unless payment for "work for hire" qualifies :)
Aug 28 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent reply =?UTF-8?B?Ikx1w61z?= Marques" <luis luismarques.eu> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.
When I read this post one of the things that crossed my mind was how Andrei could afford to do this, but personal economic issues tend to be sensitive matters so I didn't presume to ask. It seems that someone else asked it (very directly) on reddit, and Andrei replied. His answer is basically that he's taking a large pay cut to do this: https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/3ioy9b/andrei_alexandrescu_c_guru_leaves_facebook_to/cuip1pd Given the implicit donation (the financial opportunity cost) that Andrei is making to D, I just wanted to say: thank you.
Aug 28 2015
parent Tony <tonytdominguez aol.com> writes:
On Friday, 28 August 2015 at 20:34:16 UTC, LuĂ­s Marques wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.
When I read this post one of the things that crossed my mind was how Andrei could afford to do this, but personal economic issues tend to be sensitive matters so I didn't presume to ask. It seems that someone else asked it (very directly) on reddit, and Andrei replied. His answer is basically that he's taking a large pay cut to do this: https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/3ioy9b/andrei_alexandrescu_c_guru_leaves_facebook_to/cuip1pd Given the implicit donation (the financial opportunity cost) that Andrei is making to D, I just wanted to say: thank you.
But wouldn't his Facebook stock alone allow him to live comfortably with no job? I think it is a good decision when you have reached financial independence to do what you most want to do.
Dec 08 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Paolo Invernizzi" <paolo.invernizzi no.address> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.
 
I understand very well the difficulty of decisions of such kinds, that's why you have all my respect.
Aug 29 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "Marc =?UTF-8?B?U2Now7x0eiI=?= <schuetzm gmx.net> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.
Wow, I was really shocked to read this. It takes a lot of courage to do something like this. I wish you and your family all the best luck with this decision, and I'm sure it will be very positive for the D community.
Aug 29 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "w0rp" <devw0rp gmail.com> writes:
I'm a bit late to reply to this announcement, but I would like to 
say that I am quite surprised by it. I really respect your 
decision to leave what must have been a very lucrative job to 
double down on D.

I have loved D since I picked it up years ago, and TDPL was my 
first real introduction to the language. You have really done a 
lot to contribute to a great language, and you are one of the 
software professionals I most respect. I'm looking forward to 
seeing what you can accomplish as a full time D overlord in the 
future.
Aug 29 2015
prev sibling next sibling parent "bitwise" <bitwise.pvt gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 Facebook has impacted my career and life very positively, and I 
 am grateful to have been a part of it for this long. The time 
 has come for me, however, to fully focus on pushing D forward. 
 As sorry I am for leaving a good and secure career behind, I am 
 excited many times over about the great challenges and 
 opportunities going forward.

 Next step with the D Language Foundation is a formal talk with 
 the foundation's prospective attorney tomorrow. I hope to get 
 the foundation in motion as soon as possible, though I'm told 
 there are numerous steps to complete. I will keep this forum 
 posted about progress.

 I'm also glad to announce that the D Language Foundation 
 already has a donor - I have decided to contribute my books' 
 royalties to it. I encourage others to respond in kind.


 Thanks,

 Andrei
Hey, awesome news! I think D has a lot of potential. I really wish it got the attention it deserves. Just curious though, where do containers sit on your todo list? Is there a game-plan for this posted anywhere?
Aug 29 2015
prev sibling parent reply "Andrei" <syntaxbeta gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Great news. I wish you all the best. PS: Multa bafta, sper sa duci D-ul acolo unde-i este locul.
Aug 30 2015
parent "FrankLike" <1150015857 qq.com> writes:
On Sunday, 30 August 2015 at 11:48:26 UTC, Andrei wrote:
 On Monday, 24 August 2015 at 18:43:01 UTC, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 wrote:
 Hello everyone,


 Following an increasing desire to focus on working on the D 
 language and foundation, I have recently made the difficult 
 decision to part ways with Facebook, my employer of five years 
 and nine months.

 [...]
Great news. I wish you all the best. PS: Multa bafta, sper sa duci D-ul acolo unde-i este locul.
Past is the past, why care; if you come out, perhaps the development of D will be better; the future is waiting for you to develop.
Aug 30 2015