www.digitalmars.com         C & C++   DMDScript  

digitalmars.D.announce - LDC 1.7.0

reply kinke <noone nowhere.com> writes:
Hi everyone,

on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
highlights of this version in a nutshell:

* Based on D 2.077.1.
* Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
* LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

Full release log and downloads: 
https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

Thanks to all contributors!
Jan 05
next sibling parent Mike Parker <aldacron gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
Awesome! I need to get in touch with you, but I'm guessing noone nowhere.com is a dead end :-) Please send something to aldacron gmail.com. I'd like to talk about coordinating LDC release announcements on the blog.
Jan 05
prev sibling next sibling parent =?UTF-8?B?6bKc5Y2R5ouT6LeL5p6r?= <hkli2012 126.com> writes:
Great, thank you very much!
And does LDC has the plan for release an AArch64/Linux version?


On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
Jan 05
prev sibling next sibling parent Soulsbane <paul acheronsoft.com> writes:
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
Does anyone know if the ldc2 Snap is going to be updated. It is at 1.4.0 and snap refresh says no updates available. Thanks!
Jan 05
prev sibling next sibling parent reply German Diago <germandiago gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
I just dropped here to say that I have been considering Nim and D for a while and, to some extent, Rust. You are guys doing a great job shaping D for *real projects*, which is what I care about the most. I think I will definitely go with D finally when I try an alternative to C++ (though C++ still remains my main language). I still have to give it a serious try, but this is what made me convinced: - a superior interoperability story (C and C++, Objective-C, Windows, now adding the C++ exception catching...). I cannot emphasize enough how important this is for me. - a reasonable relearning and upgrade coming from C++. - very powerful generative programming. I see that things like generating bindings for scripting languages and others have an edge with static introspection + mixins. - more mature than Nim, at least at this point. - want no gc? Ok, at least there is BetterC, so if I invest myself quite a bit on D (I am the kind of programmer that likes to squeeze power out of machines, so this always means that I will not consider VM languages), I will always have. I hope I can give it a try with one (or two, to be decided) hobby projects I have been doing for a while. I will report the negative points also as I use it :p. By the way, and a bit off-topic for the post, but, if I want to port my code to run on Android/iOS, what is the recommended way? 1. create a shared library and consume it? Is that possible and smooth enough for ARM? - easy to understand for - a superior metaprogramming experience that is
Jan 06
next sibling parent reply John Colvin <john.loughran.colvin gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
 - want no gc? Ok, at least there is BetterC, so if I invest 
 myself quite a bit on D (I am the kind of programmer that likes 
 to squeeze power out of machines, so this always means that I 
 will not consider VM languages), I will always have.
Also, it's perfectly possible to avoid most of the downsides of the GC (and keep some of the upsides) without worrying about BetterC. nogc where you need it is great, BetterC is a much more extreme solution.
Jan 07
parent German Diago <germandiago gmail.com> writes:
On Sunday, 7 January 2018 at 12:22:17 UTC, John Colvin wrote:
 On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
 - want no gc? Ok, at least there is BetterC, so if I invest 
 myself quite a bit on D (I am the kind of programmer that 
 likes to squeeze power out of machines, so this always means 
 that I will not consider VM languages), I will always have.
Also, it's perfectly possible to avoid most of the downsides of the GC (and keep some of the upsides) without worrying about BetterC. nogc where you need it is great, BetterC is a much more extreme solution.
Yes, that is my guess also, but there are chances that I will be in these extreme situations myself, not for my pet projects, but for some embedded stuff I want to do. That is why I want something without runtime for microcontrollers at some point. Just to have the possibility open. For now I think I will stick to C++ for that (a subset) until I am confident D can do perfectly ok there. I know D is designed for that also (modulo GC and runtime) but I still need to see the practical, day to day problems if I use D for such a thing instead of C++, which I know quite well.
Jan 07
prev sibling parent reply Joakim <dlang joakim.fea.st> writes:
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
 negative points also as I use it :p. By the way, and a bit 
 off-topic for the post, but, if I want to port my code to run 
 on Android/iOS, what is the recommended way?

 1. create a shared library and consume it? Is that possible and 
 smooth enough for ARM?
Yes, that is the way native apps are invoked on Android, see the wiki for more info: http://wiki.dlang.org/Build_D_for_Android iOS support is in limbo, as a contributor got very far with it but hasn't had time for it lately.
Jan 07
parent German Diago <germandiago gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 8 January 2018 at 03:14:32 UTC, Joakim wrote:
 On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 16:25:46 UTC, German Diago wrote:
 negative points also as I use it :p. By the way, and a bit 
 off-topic for the post, but, if I want to port my code to run 
 on Android/iOS, what is the recommended way?

 1. create a shared library and consume it? Is that possible 
 and smooth enough for ARM?
Yes, that is the way native apps are invoked on Android, see the wiki for more info: http://wiki.dlang.org/Build_D_for_Android iOS support is in limbo, as a contributor got very far with it but hasn't had time for it lately.
Thanks for the link!
Jan 07
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Johannes Loher <johannes.loher fg4f.de> writes:
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
Hey, thanks for your great work! Would it be possible to add a armhf build to the release? If you can not do it yourself, could you please point me to some resources where I can find out about how to create such a release build myself? Thank you!
Jan 20
parent reply Nicholas Wilson <iamthewilsonator hotmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 20 January 2018 at 15:19:13 UTC, Johannes Loher 
wrote:
 On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
Hey, thanks for your great work! Would it be possible to add a armhf build to the release? If you can not do it yourself, could you please point me to some resources where I can find out about how to create such a release build myself? Thank you!
See https://wiki.dlang.org/Building_LDC_from_source
Jan 20
parent reply Joakim <dlang joakim.fea.st> writes:
On Sunday, 21 January 2018 at 04:45:49 UTC, Nicholas Wilson wrote:
 On Saturday, 20 January 2018 at 15:19:13 UTC, Johannes Loher 
 wrote:
 On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 [...]
Hey, thanks for your great work! Would it be possible to add a armhf build to the release? If you can not do it yourself, could you please point me to some resources where I can find out about how to create such a release build myself? Thank you!
See https://wiki.dlang.org/Building_LDC_from_source
You can also use the armhf build of ldc 1.6, even if just to build 1.7 yourself: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.6.0
Jan 20
parent reply kinke <noone nowhere.com> writes:
On Sunday, 21 January 2018 at 05:31:28 UTC, Joakim wrote:
 On Sunday, 21 January 2018 at 04:45:49 UTC, Nicholas Wilson 
 wrote:
 On Saturday, 20 January 2018 at 15:19:13 UTC, Johannes Loher 
 wrote:
 Hey, thanks for your great work! Would it be possible to add 
 a armhf build to the release? If you can not do it yourself, 
 could you please point me to some resources where I can find 
 out about how to create such a release build myself? Thank 
 you!
See https://wiki.dlang.org/Building_LDC_from_source
You can also use the armhf build of ldc 1.6, even if just to build 1.7 yourself: https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.6.0
Please note that building a release package isn't identical to just build from source; there are subtle diffs and additional steps to be undertaken. I hope we get an ARM CI box soon and can automate the armhf package generation as well. In the meantime, I started an LLVM 5.0.1 build in my qemu emulator 12 hours ago; one third has been compiled so far, so you may expect the armhf package to be available tomorrow or the day after that.
Jan 21
parent reply Johannes Loher <johannes.loher fg4f.de> writes:
On Sunday, 21 January 2018 at 12:00:32 UTC, kinke wrote:
[...]
 Please note that building a release package isn't identical to 
 just build from source; there are subtle diffs and additional 
 steps to be undertaken. I hope we get an ARM CI box soon and 
 can automate the armhf package generation as well.

 In the meantime, I started an LLVM 5.0.1 build in my qemu 
 emulator 12 hours ago; one third has been compiled so far, so 
 you may expect the armhf package to be available tomorrow or 
 the day after that.
That is great news to me, thank you very much for your effort!
Jan 21
parent kinke <noone nowhere.com> writes:
On Sunday, 21 January 2018 at 15:38:02 UTC, Johannes Loher wrote:
 On Sunday, 21 January 2018 at 12:00:32 UTC, kinke wrote:
 In the meantime, I started an LLVM 5.0.1 build in my qemu 
 emulator 12 hours ago; one third has been compiled so far, so 
 you may expect the armhf package to be available tomorrow or 
 the day after that.
That is great news to me, thank you very much for your effort!
You're welcome; it's up now.
Jan 23
prev sibling parent reply aberba <karabutaworld gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
Ubuntu 16.04 still has version 1.0.0 in its repository. Why is it not updated anymore?
Jan 27
parent reply aberba <karabutaworld gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 27 January 2018 at 21:37:08 UTC, aberba wrote:
 On Saturday, 6 January 2018 at 01:19:14 UTC, kinke wrote:
 Hi everyone,

 on behalf of the LDC team, I'm glad to announce LDC 1.7. The 
 highlights of this version in a nutshell:

 * Based on D 2.077.1.
 * Catching C++ exceptions supported on Linux and Windows.
 * LLVM for prebuilt packages upgraded to v5.0.1.

 Full release log and downloads: 
 https://github.com/ldc-developers/ldc/releases/tag/v1.7.0

 Thanks to all contributors!
Ubuntu 16.04 still has version 1.0.0 in its repository. Why is it not updated anymore?
Sorry. its Compiler version 1.1.1 based on dmd v2.071.2, LLVM 3.9.1. I expected compiler version 1.7.0 which is the latest.
Jan 27
parent reply Dominikus Dittes Scherkl <dominikus.scherkl continental-corporation.com> writes:
On Saturday, 27 January 2018 at 21:42:49 UTC, aberba wrote:
 [...] Ubuntu 16.04
This is a long-term support distribution. Don't expect those to have actual tip versions of any SW package! They rely on stabe versions that don't have the latest features but only those very well tested.
Jan 28
parent reply aberba <karabutaworld gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 29 January 2018 at 07:40:10 UTC, Dominikus Dittes 
Scherkl wrote:
 On Saturday, 27 January 2018 at 21:42:49 UTC, aberba wrote:
 [...] Ubuntu 16.04
This is a long-term support distribution. Don't expect those to have actual tip versions of any SW package! They rely on stabe versions that don't have the latest features but only those very well tested.
The semver 1.7 is not an unstable package. Its that their reason for no updates?
Jan 30
next sibling parent reply Dominikus Dittes Scherkl <dominikus.scherkl continental-corporation.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 09:38:26 UTC, aberba wrote:
 On Monday, 29 January 2018 at 07:40:10 UTC, Dominikus Dittes 
 Scherkl wrote:
 On Saturday, 27 January 2018 at 21:42:49 UTC, aberba wrote:
 [...] Ubuntu 16.04
This is a long-term support distribution. Don't expect those to have actual tip versions of any SW package! They rely on stabe versions that don't have the latest features but only those very well tested.
The semver 1.7 is not an unstable package. Its that their reason for no updates?
I don't know their exact update policy, but generally the Long-Term support distros tend to have rather old packages for a lot of sw. I think they update only stuff for which security problems were fixed and everything that depends on those, and that's it.
Jan 30
parent Dominikus Dittes Scherkl <dominikus.scherkl continental-corporation.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 11:44:11 UTC, Dominikus Dittes 
Scherkl wrote:
 I think they update only stuff for which security problems were 
 fixed and everything that depends on those, and that's it.
And by the way, for some people that is the reason to install such a kind of distro: to not be suprised by any updates that destroy your dependencies or change the behavior in any unexpected way. If you like, you can update a package any time by yourself, if that is necessary. To be always up to date I would recommend a different kind of distro.
Jan 30
prev sibling parent reply Johan Engelen <j j.nl> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 09:38:26 UTC, aberba wrote:
 On Monday, 29 January 2018 at 07:40:10 UTC, Dominikus Dittes 
 Scherkl wrote:
 On Saturday, 27 January 2018 at 21:42:49 UTC, aberba wrote:
 [...] Ubuntu 16.04
This is a long-term support distribution. Don't expect those to have actual tip versions of any SW package! They rely on stabe versions that don't have the latest features but only those very well tested.
The semver 1.7 is not an unstable package. Its that their reason for no updates?
LDC 1.7.0 includes major changes to the frontend and is not well-tested. If you want a better-tested recent LDC, I recommend LDC 1.6.0, which is used in production at Weka. - Johan
Jan 30
parent reply aberba <karabutaworld gmail.com> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 18:30:56 UTC, Johan Engelen wrote:
 On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 09:38:26 UTC, aberba wrote:
 On Monday, 29 January 2018 at 07:40:10 UTC, Dominikus Dittes 
 Scherkl wrote:
 On Saturday, 27 January 2018 at 21:42:49 UTC, aberba wrote:
 [...] Ubuntu 16.04
This is a long-term support distribution. Don't expect those to have actual tip versions of any SW package! They rely on stabe versions that don't have the latest features but only those very well tested.
The semver 1.7 is not an unstable package. Its that their reason for no updates?
LDC 1.7.0 includes major changes to the frontend and is not well-tested. If you want a better-tested recent LDC, I recommend LDC 1.6.0, which is used in production at Weka. - Johan
I expected at least 1.6 to be available in the repo by now. I remember the availability of LDC in ubuntu was celebrated here...now it seem abandoned after such an effort. Maybe someone from the team can answer what happened.
Jan 30
next sibling parent reply Kagamin <spam here.lot> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 19:57:39 UTC, aberba wrote:
 now it seem abandoned after such an effort.
Can you confirm it for Ubuntu 17?
Feb 02
parent aberba <karabutaworld gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 2 February 2018 at 12:57:44 UTC, Kagamin wrote:
 On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 19:57:39 UTC, aberba wrote:
 now it seem abandoned after such an effort.
Can you confirm it for Ubuntu 17?
I'm on 16.04.
Feb 02
prev sibling parent Seb <seb wilzba.ch> writes:
On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 19:57:39 UTC, aberba wrote:
 On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 18:30:56 UTC, Johan Engelen 
 wrote:
 On Tuesday, 30 January 2018 at 09:38:26 UTC, aberba wrote:
 On Monday, 29 January 2018 at 07:40:10 UTC, Dominikus Dittes 
 Scherkl wrote:
 On Saturday, 27 January 2018 at 21:42:49 UTC, aberba wrote:
 [...] Ubuntu 16.04
This is a long-term support distribution. Don't expect those to have actual tip versions of any SW package! They rely on stabe versions that don't have the latest features but only those very well tested.
The semver 1.7 is not an unstable package. Its that their reason for no updates?
LDC 1.7.0 includes major changes to the frontend and is not well-tested. If you want a better-tested recent LDC, I recommend LDC 1.6.0, which is used in production at Weka. - Johan
I expected at least 1.6 to be available in the repo by now. I remember the availability of LDC in ubuntu was celebrated here...now it seem abandoned after such an effort. Maybe someone from the team can answer what happened.
1.6 is in Debian - as other explained before Debian is __very__ focused on stability. https://packages.debian.org/sid/ldc ("Unstable" - 1.6) https://packages.debian.org/buster/ldc (Debian 9 - 1.5) https://packages.debian.org/jessie/ldc (Debian 8 - 1.0) Ubuntu usually lags one version behind Debian packages: https://packages.ubuntu.com/bionic/ldc ("Unstable" - 1.5) https://packages.ubuntu.com/artful/ldc (17.10 - 1.4) If you want to have the latest D compiler on Debian/Ubuntu, you have these options: - use d-apt (d-apt.sourceforge.net) - use the official install script (https://dlang.org/install.html) - install the official deb package yourself (https://dlang.org/download.html) - use a different distro This is not something that can __ever__ be fixed. It's the fundamental way Debian's packaging and release cycle work.
Feb 02