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digitalmars.D.announce - D Shared Software System version 0.1 Released!

reply Gregor Richards <Richards codu.org> writes:
I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D Shared 
Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at a point 
where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)

Most notable bug is that its installation scheme is a bit rigid right 
now. It's on "the list."

DSSS is described fully below, but up-front I will mention that part of 
DSSS' purpose is to provide an analogue to Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems.

DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .

Here's everything you need to know:


The D Shared Software System
----------------------------

DSSS, the D Shared Software System, is a tool to ease the building,
installation, configuration and acquisition of D software.


Building
--------

There are plenty of tools for building D software. There's bud (previously
build), upon which DSSS is based, the antiquated make, and a plethora of 
other
tools capable of building D software. DSSS intends to be more generally 
useful
than any of them.

  * DSSS eliminates the need to keep lists of source files, figuring 
them all
    out by imports in source. It will even link in the proper libraries
    automatically.
  * DSSS can transparently build libraries from any D package.
  * DSSS automatically generates .di (D import) files for libraries 
which cause
    code using the library to link it in automatically.
  * Since DSSS uses bud, DSSS has all of bud's features as well.
  * DSSS can automatically choose names for libraries generated from D 
packages
    which will not conflict with libraries from other sources, or 
incompatible
    compilers. So you do not need to concern yourself with library names.


Installation
------------

As compared to building software, there are few tools capable of 
installing D
software well.

  * DSSS maintains a centralized repository of installed software, such 
that you
    can use it in your software trivially. .di files and library files 
are all
    managed by DSSS, as part of its effort to make imports map to 
library files
    automatically.
  * DSSS keeps track of all of the software that has been installed through
    DSSS, so any of it can be uninstalled easily.


Configuration
-------------

DSSS' build configuration file (dsss.conf) allows full use of version
statements from D. So, you can fine-tune your software to build 
precisely what
is necessary for the host system.


Acquisition
-----------

In the spirit of Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems, DSSS has a central 
repository of
sources for D software. It maintains a list of software packages available,
where they can be acquired, and what packages/modules they provide. 
Because it
maintains a list of packages and modules, dependencies for a tool can be
installed as easily as:
$ dsss net deps

DSSS will then trace all of the software's D dependencies and install them.
This feature can of course also be used to install arbitrary software, 
such as:
$ dsss net install mango

Upon either of these commands, DSSS will download the software from its
upstream source, compile it, and install it.


More Information
----------------

DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss . It is FOSS
(Free/Open Source Software) under a very permissive license. Its development
code base is maintained in subversion and can be checked out from the 
following
URL:
http://svn.dsource.org/projects/dsss/trunk

DSSS has been tested and is known to work with GDC on Posix systems, and 
with DMD on Windows. It has not been tested with GDC on Windows or DMD 
on GNU/Linux.



At present, the following software is installable via DSSS:
bcd.gen
bintod
ddbi
derelict
dirclib
dool
dsss
dstring
duit
gdc-gcc-3.4
gdc-gcc-4.0
mango
wxd


To add your own software, configure it to use DSSS (technically you 
don't have to, but it'd help ... ) then submit the information to me, 
and I'll add it.

  - Gregor Richards
Nov 09 2006
next sibling parent reply Daniel Keep <daniel.keep.lists gmail.com> writes:
This is exactly what D needed.

For reference, I've always found that Python's way of doing it is also
cool.  distutils (shipped with Python) can generate a wide number of
distribution packages: UNIX tar balls, DEBs, RPMs, ZIPs and even Windows
Installer MSIs.

Then we have things like CPAN and Ruby Gems.  If you need a library, you
just work out which one you want, and tell the system to install it.

A few suggestions:

* Have a way to take a package, and generate distribution files.  This
would allow maintainers to use DSSS to generate distro media for other
formats.

* Corollary to the above, make it possible to generate a distribution
both with and without dependencies.  This could allow application
developers to leverage DSSS to build complete installers for their
programs without having to worry about finding and building all of the
libraries, and the libraries they depend on, etc.

  Again, for comparison, Python's py2exe can be used to do this, and is
VERY cool.

Thank you so much for writing this.  Downloading now :)

	-- Daniel

-- 
Unlike Knuth, I have neither proven or tried the above; it may not even
make sense.

v2sw5+8Yhw5ln4+5pr6OFPma8u6+7Lw4Tm6+7l6+7D
i28a2Xs3MSr2e4/6+7t4TNSMb6HTOp5en5g6RAHCP  http://hackerkey.com/
Nov 09 2006
parent Gregor Richards <Richards codu.org> writes:
Daniel Keep wrote:
 This is exactly what D needed.
 
 For reference, I've always found that Python's way of doing it is also
 cool.  distutils (shipped with Python) can generate a wide number of
 distribution packages: UNIX tar balls, DEBs, RPMs, ZIPs and even Windows
 Installer MSIs.
 
 Then we have things like CPAN and Ruby Gems.  If you need a library, you
 just work out which one you want, and tell the system to install it.
 
 A few suggestions:
 
 * Have a way to take a package, and generate distribution files.  This
 would allow maintainers to use DSSS to generate distro media for other
 formats.
 
 * Corollary to the above, make it possible to generate a distribution
 both with and without dependencies.  This could allow application
 developers to leverage DSSS to build complete installers for their
 programs without having to worry about finding and building all of the
 libraries, and the libraries they depend on, etc.
 
   Again, for comparison, Python's py2exe can be used to do this, and is
 VERY cool.
 
 Thank you so much for writing this.  Downloading now :)
 
 	-- Daniel
 

An excellent idea. I'll put it on "The List." - Gregor Richards
Nov 09 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:
 I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D Shared 
 Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at a point 
 where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)

*raises hand* Nice work! Sean
Nov 09 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Chris Nicholson-Sauls <ibisbasenji gmail.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:
 I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D Shared 
 Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at a point 
 where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)
 
 Most notable bug is that its installation scheme is a bit rigid right 
 now. It's on "the list."
 
 DSSS is described fully below, but up-front I will mention that part of 
 DSSS' purpose is to provide an analogue to Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems.
 
 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .
 
 Here's everything you need to know:
 
 
 The D Shared Software System
 ----------------------------
 
 DSSS, the D Shared Software System, is a tool to ease the building,
 installation, configuration and acquisition of D software.
 
 
 Building
 --------
 
 There are plenty of tools for building D software. There's bud (previously
 build), upon which DSSS is based, the antiquated make, and a plethora of 
 other
 tools capable of building D software. DSSS intends to be more generally 
 useful
 than any of them.
 
  * DSSS eliminates the need to keep lists of source files, figuring them 
 all
    out by imports in source. It will even link in the proper libraries
    automatically.
  * DSSS can transparently build libraries from any D package.
  * DSSS automatically generates .di (D import) files for libraries which 
 cause
    code using the library to link it in automatically.
  * Since DSSS uses bud, DSSS has all of bud's features as well.
  * DSSS can automatically choose names for libraries generated from D 
 packages
    which will not conflict with libraries from other sources, or 
 incompatible
    compilers. So you do not need to concern yourself with library names.
 
 
 Installation
 ------------
 
 As compared to building software, there are few tools capable of 
 installing D
 software well.
 
  * DSSS maintains a centralized repository of installed software, such 
 that you
    can use it in your software trivially. .di files and library files 
 are all
    managed by DSSS, as part of its effort to make imports map to library 
 files
    automatically.
  * DSSS keeps track of all of the software that has been installed through
    DSSS, so any of it can be uninstalled easily.
 
 
 Configuration
 -------------
 
 DSSS' build configuration file (dsss.conf) allows full use of version
 statements from D. So, you can fine-tune your software to build 
 precisely what
 is necessary for the host system.
 
 
 Acquisition
 -----------
 
 In the spirit of Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems, DSSS has a central 
 repository of
 sources for D software. It maintains a list of software packages available,
 where they can be acquired, and what packages/modules they provide. 
 Because it
 maintains a list of packages and modules, dependencies for a tool can be
 installed as easily as:
 $ dsss net deps
 
 DSSS will then trace all of the software's D dependencies and install them.
 This feature can of course also be used to install arbitrary software, 
 such as:
 $ dsss net install mango
 
 Upon either of these commands, DSSS will download the software from its
 upstream source, compile it, and install it.
 
 
 More Information
 ----------------
 
 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss . It is FOSS
 (Free/Open Source Software) under a very permissive license. Its 
 development
 code base is maintained in subversion and can be checked out from the 
 following
 URL:
 http://svn.dsource.org/projects/dsss/trunk
 
 DSSS has been tested and is known to work with GDC on Posix systems, and 
 with DMD on Windows. It has not been tested with GDC on Windows or DMD 
 on GNU/Linux.
 
 
 
 At present, the following software is installable via DSSS:
 bcd.gen
 bintod
 ddbi
 derelict
 dirclib
 dool
 dsss
 dstring
 duit
 gdc-gcc-3.4
 gdc-gcc-4.0
 mango
 wxd
 
 
 To add your own software, configure it to use DSSS (technically you 
 don't have to, but it'd help ... ) then submit the information to me, 
 and I'll add it.
 
  - Gregor Richards

Very nice indeed! I do some work with Ruby and do love the Gems system. I do some work with PHP, and there we have PEAR, also quite nice. And of course there's always Gentoo... sure, yes, its an operating system, but its 'emerge' is a godsend sometimes. Its heartening to think I can now have the option of similar functionality in D. Good going. -- Chris Nicholson-Sauls
Nov 09 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent "Jarrett Billingsley" <kb3ctd2 yahoo.com> writes:
"Gregor Richards" <Richards codu.org> wrote in message 
news:ej0vcu$2cm7$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 The D Shared Software System
 ----------------------------

 DSSS, the D Shared Software System, is a tool to ease the building,
 installation, configuration and acquisition of D software.

Fantastic! I'll be sure to check it out and try to get MiniD / nonagon on it (eventually!).
Nov 09 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Bill Baxter <dnewsgroup billbaxter.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:
 I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D Shared 
 Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at a point 
 where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)

Excellent! Good work! Looking forward to trying it out. --bb
Nov 09 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent "Andrey Khropov" <andrey.khropov gmail.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:

 

Totally cool! Really shows the maturing process of the language. Want to see it in D's standard package. -- AKhropov
Nov 10 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Dawid =?UTF-8?B?Q2nEmcW8YXJraWV3aWN6?= <dawid.ciezarkiewicz gmail.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:

 I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D Shared
 Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at a point
 where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)

This is definitely what D needs! I will try it, but if it works like you described - that be it. Keep up this fantastic idea.
Nov 11 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent pragma <ericanderton yahoo.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:
 I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D Shared 
 Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at a point 
 where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)
 
 Most notable bug is that its installation scheme is a bit rigid right 
 now. It's on "the list."
 
 DSSS is described fully below, but up-front I will mention that part of 
 DSSS' purpose is to provide an analogue to Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems.
 
 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .
 
 Here's everything you need to know:
 
 
 The D Shared Software System
 ----------------------------
 
 DSSS, the D Shared Software System, is a tool to ease the building,
 installation, configuration and acquisition of D software.
 
 
 Building
 --------
 
 There are plenty of tools for building D software. There's bud (previously
 build), upon which DSSS is based, the antiquated make, and a plethora of 
 other
 tools capable of building D software. DSSS intends to be more generally 
 useful
 than any of them.
 
  * DSSS eliminates the need to keep lists of source files, figuring them 
 all
    out by imports in source. It will even link in the proper libraries
    automatically.
  * DSSS can transparently build libraries from any D package.
  * DSSS automatically generates .di (D import) files for libraries which 
 cause
    code using the library to link it in automatically.
  * Since DSSS uses bud, DSSS has all of bud's features as well.
  * DSSS can automatically choose names for libraries generated from D 
 packages
    which will not conflict with libraries from other sources, or 
 incompatible
    compilers. So you do not need to concern yourself with library names.
 
 
 Installation
 ------------
 
 As compared to building software, there are few tools capable of 
 installing D
 software well.
 
  * DSSS maintains a centralized repository of installed software, such 
 that you
    can use it in your software trivially. .di files and library files 
 are all
    managed by DSSS, as part of its effort to make imports map to library 
 files
    automatically.
  * DSSS keeps track of all of the software that has been installed through
    DSSS, so any of it can be uninstalled easily.
 
 
 Configuration
 -------------
 
 DSSS' build configuration file (dsss.conf) allows full use of version
 statements from D. So, you can fine-tune your software to build 
 precisely what
 is necessary for the host system.
 
 
 Acquisition
 -----------
 
 In the spirit of Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems, DSSS has a central 
 repository of
 sources for D software. It maintains a list of software packages available,
 where they can be acquired, and what packages/modules they provide. 
 Because it
 maintains a list of packages and modules, dependencies for a tool can be
 installed as easily as:
 $ dsss net deps
 
 DSSS will then trace all of the software's D dependencies and install them.
 This feature can of course also be used to install arbitrary software, 
 such as:
 $ dsss net install mango
 
 Upon either of these commands, DSSS will download the software from its
 upstream source, compile it, and install it.
 
 
 More Information
 ----------------
 
 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss . It is FOSS
 (Free/Open Source Software) under a very permissive license. Its 
 development
 code base is maintained in subversion and can be checked out from the 
 following
 URL:
 http://svn.dsource.org/projects/dsss/trunk
 
 DSSS has been tested and is known to work with GDC on Posix systems, and 
 with DMD on Windows. It has not been tested with GDC on Windows or DMD 
 on GNU/Linux.
 
 
 
 At present, the following software is installable via DSSS:
 bcd.gen
 bintod
 ddbi
 derelict
 dirclib
 dool
 dsss
 dstring
 duit
 gdc-gcc-3.4
 gdc-gcc-4.0
 mango
 wxd
 
 
 To add your own software, configure it to use DSSS (technically you 
 don't have to, but it'd help ... ) then submit the information to me, 
 and I'll add it.
 
  - Gregor Richards

I would be happy to plug my libraries into this once I have a release version ready for the public. This is fantastic.
Nov 11 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Dawid =?UTF-8?B?Q2nEmcW8YXJraWV3aWN6?= <dawid.ciezarkiewicz gmail.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:
 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .

Could somebody drop me the source, because I just can't wait when dsource will come back? :)
Nov 11 2006
parent reply Gregor Richards <Richards codu.org> writes:
Dawid Ciężarkiewicz wrote:
 Gregor Richards wrote:
 
DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .

Could somebody drop me the source, because I just can't wait when dsource will come back? :)

http://www.codu.org/dsss-0.1/ Note that the net sources list is hosted on DSource, so you'll find that the net feature doesn't work at all :P I'm going to add redundancy support to that whole subsystem, but it's not there yet. - Gregor Richards
Nov 11 2006
parent reply Anders Bergh <anders1 gmail.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:
 Dawid Ciężarkiewicz wrote:
 Gregor Richards wrote:

 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .

Could somebody drop me the source, because I just can't wait when dsource will come back? :)

http://www.codu.org/dsss-0.1/ Note that the net sources list is hosted on DSource, so you'll find that the net feature doesn't work at all :P I'm going to add redundancy support to that whole subsystem, but it's not there yet. - Gregor Richards

I get the following message when trying to access that link: FORBIDDEN You tried to access a document for which you don't have privileges.
Nov 12 2006
parent Gregor Richards <Richards codu.org> writes:
Anders Bergh wrote:
 Gregor Richards wrote:
 
 Dawid Ciężarkiewicz wrote:

 Gregor Richards wrote:

 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .

Could somebody drop me the source, because I just can't wait when dsource will come back? :)

http://www.codu.org/dsss-0.1/ Note that the net sources list is hosted on DSource, so you'll find that the net feature doesn't work at all :P I'm going to add redundancy support to that whole subsystem, but it's not there yet. - Gregor Richards

I get the following message when trying to access that link: FORBIDDEN You tried to access a document for which you don't have privileges.

Oy, oops X_X Fixed, forgot to add the .htaccess. - Gregor Richards
Nov 12 2006
prev sibling parent reply clayasaurus <clayasaurus gmail.com> writes:
Gregor Richards wrote:
 I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D Shared 
 Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at a point 
 where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)
 
 Most notable bug is that its installation scheme is a bit rigid right 
 now. It's on "the list."
 
 DSSS is described fully below, but up-front I will mention that part of 
 DSSS' purpose is to provide an analogue to Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems.
 
 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .
 
 Here's everything you need to know:
 
 
 The D Shared Software System
 ----------------------------
 
 DSSS, the D Shared Software System, is a tool to ease the building,
 installation, configuration and acquisition of D software.
 
 
 Building
 --------
 
 There are plenty of tools for building D software. There's bud (previously
 build), upon which DSSS is based, the antiquated make, and a plethora of 
 other
 tools capable of building D software. DSSS intends to be more generally 
 useful
 than any of them.
 
  * DSSS eliminates the need to keep lists of source files, figuring them 
 all
    out by imports in source. It will even link in the proper libraries
    automatically.
  * DSSS can transparently build libraries from any D package.
  * DSSS automatically generates .di (D import) files for libraries which 
 cause
    code using the library to link it in automatically.
  * Since DSSS uses bud, DSSS has all of bud's features as well.
  * DSSS can automatically choose names for libraries generated from D 
 packages
    which will not conflict with libraries from other sources, or 
 incompatible
    compilers. So you do not need to concern yourself with library names.
 
 
 Installation
 ------------
 
 As compared to building software, there are few tools capable of 
 installing D
 software well.
 
  * DSSS maintains a centralized repository of installed software, such 
 that you
    can use it in your software trivially. .di files and library files 
 are all
    managed by DSSS, as part of its effort to make imports map to library 
 files
    automatically.
  * DSSS keeps track of all of the software that has been installed through
    DSSS, so any of it can be uninstalled easily.
 
 
 Configuration
 -------------
 
 DSSS' build configuration file (dsss.conf) allows full use of version
 statements from D. So, you can fine-tune your software to build 
 precisely what
 is necessary for the host system.
 
 
 Acquisition
 -----------
 
 In the spirit of Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems, DSSS has a central 
 repository of
 sources for D software. It maintains a list of software packages available,
 where they can be acquired, and what packages/modules they provide. 
 Because it
 maintains a list of packages and modules, dependencies for a tool can be
 installed as easily as:
 $ dsss net deps
 
 DSSS will then trace all of the software's D dependencies and install them.
 This feature can of course also be used to install arbitrary software, 
 such as:
 $ dsss net install mango
 
 Upon either of these commands, DSSS will download the software from its
 upstream source, compile it, and install it.
 
 
 More Information
 ----------------
 
 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss . It is FOSS
 (Free/Open Source Software) under a very permissive license. Its 
 development
 code base is maintained in subversion and can be checked out from the 
 following
 URL:
 http://svn.dsource.org/projects/dsss/trunk
 
 DSSS has been tested and is known to work with GDC on Posix systems, and 
 with DMD on Windows. It has not been tested with GDC on Windows or DMD 
 on GNU/Linux.
 
 
 
 At present, the following software is installable via DSSS:
 bcd.gen
 bintod
 ddbi
 derelict
 dirclib
 dool
 dsss
 dstring
 duit
 gdc-gcc-3.4
 gdc-gcc-4.0
 mango
 wxd
 
 
 To add your own software, configure it to use DSSS (technically you 
 don't have to, but it'd help ... ) then submit the information to me, 
 and I'll add it.
 
  - Gregor Richards

Is there some sort of manual available for this? I'm not quite sure how I am supposed to use it. Thanks. ~ Clay
Nov 13 2006
parent Gregor Richards <Richards codu.org> writes:
clayasaurus wrote:
 Gregor Richards wrote:
 
 I have just released the first (alpha-ish) version of DSSS, the D 
 Shared Software System. It definitely still has some bugs, but it's at 
 a point where I need to see if anybody actually will use it :)

 Most notable bug is that its installation scheme is a bit rigid right 
 now. It's on "the list."

 DSSS is described fully below, but up-front I will mention that part 
 of DSSS' purpose is to provide an analogue to Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems.

 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss .

 Here's everything you need to know:


 The D Shared Software System
 ----------------------------

 DSSS, the D Shared Software System, is a tool to ease the building,
 installation, configuration and acquisition of D software.


 Building
 --------

 There are plenty of tools for building D software. There's bud 
 (previously
 build), upon which DSSS is based, the antiquated make, and a plethora 
 of other
 tools capable of building D software. DSSS intends to be more 
 generally useful
 than any of them.

  * DSSS eliminates the need to keep lists of source files, figuring 
 them all
    out by imports in source. It will even link in the proper libraries
    automatically.
  * DSSS can transparently build libraries from any D package.
  * DSSS automatically generates .di (D import) files for libraries 
 which cause
    code using the library to link it in automatically.
  * Since DSSS uses bud, DSSS has all of bud's features as well.
  * DSSS can automatically choose names for libraries generated from D 
 packages
    which will not conflict with libraries from other sources, or 
 incompatible
    compilers. So you do not need to concern yourself with library names.


 Installation
 ------------

 As compared to building software, there are few tools capable of 
 installing D
 software well.

  * DSSS maintains a centralized repository of installed software, such 
 that you
    can use it in your software trivially. .di files and library files 
 are all
    managed by DSSS, as part of its effort to make imports map to 
 library files
    automatically.
  * DSSS keeps track of all of the software that has been installed 
 through
    DSSS, so any of it can be uninstalled easily.


 Configuration
 -------------

 DSSS' build configuration file (dsss.conf) allows full use of version
 statements from D. So, you can fine-tune your software to build 
 precisely what
 is necessary for the host system.


 Acquisition
 -----------

 In the spirit of Perl's CPAN or Ruby's Gems, DSSS has a central 
 repository of
 sources for D software. It maintains a list of software packages 
 available,
 where they can be acquired, and what packages/modules they provide. 
 Because it
 maintains a list of packages and modules, dependencies for a tool can be
 installed as easily as:
 $ dsss net deps

 DSSS will then trace all of the software's D dependencies and install 
 them.
 This feature can of course also be used to install arbitrary software, 
 such as:
 $ dsss net install mango

 Upon either of these commands, DSSS will download the software from its
 upstream source, compile it, and install it.


 More Information
 ----------------

 DSSS is available from http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsss . It is FOSS
 (Free/Open Source Software) under a very permissive license. Its 
 development
 code base is maintained in subversion and can be checked out from the 
 following
 URL:
 http://svn.dsource.org/projects/dsss/trunk

 DSSS has been tested and is known to work with GDC on Posix systems, 
 and with DMD on Windows. It has not been tested with GDC on Windows or 
 DMD on GNU/Linux.



 At present, the following software is installable via DSSS:
 bcd.gen
 bintod
 ddbi
 derelict
 dirclib
 dool
 dsss
 dstring
 duit
 gdc-gcc-3.4
 gdc-gcc-4.0
 mango
 wxd


 To add your own software, configure it to use DSSS (technically you 
 don't have to, but it'd help ... ) then submit the information to me, 
 and I'll add it.

  - Gregor Richards

Is there some sort of manual available for this? I'm not quite sure how I am supposed to use it. Thanks. ~ Clay

There's a docs directory with READMEs, but not for the basic use yet - dsss help should tell you most of what you need to know to just build stuff. If you actually want to configure your software to use DSSS, read docs/README.software_engineer - Gregor Richards
Nov 13 2006