www.digitalmars.com         C & C++   DMDScript  

digitalmars.D.announce - ACCU 2010 Call for Papers

reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
Hello,


Giovanni Asproni, chair of the ACCU 2010 conference, asked me personally 
to relay the message below to the community. Although not specified in 
the CfP below, there will be a one-day tutorial on D just before the 
conference. Naturally, there is a strong interest in D-related 
submissions for the main conference as well. So I compel you to think of 
submitting a talk proposal.

ACCU is a good and very fun conference. I've been there quite a few 
times, and last year Walter and I enjoyed it a lot.


Andrei

============================

Call for Participation - ACCU 2010
April 14-17, 2010. Barcelo Oxford Hotel, Oxford, UK
http://www.accu.org/conference
Submission deadline: 30th of September 2009
Highlight: Special track on software testing, please read on
Email proposals to: Giovanni Asproni, conference accu.org

We would like to invite you to present a session at this leading
software development conference.

We have a long tradition of high quality sessions covering
many aspects of software development, from programming languages
(e.g., C, C++, Java, C#, Ruby, Groovy, Python, Erlang, Haskell, etc.),
and technologies (libraries, frameworks, databases, etc.) to subjects
about the wider development environment such  as testing, development 
process,
design, analysis, patterns, project management, and softer aspects such as
team building, communication and leadership.

In particular, this year we are going to have a special track on
software testing--we are interested in experience reports,
techniques, lessons learned, etc.

Sessions may be either tutorial-based, presentations of case studies, or
take the form of interactive workshops. We are always open to novel 
formats, so
please contact us with your idea.
The standard length of a session is 90 minutes, with some exceptions.
In order to allow less experienced speakers to speak at
the conference without the pressure of filling a full 90 minutes, we
reserve a number of shorter 45 minute sessions.

If you would like to run a session please let us know by emailing your
proposals to conference accu.org by the 30th of September 2009 at the 
latest.
Please include the following to support your proposal:

* Title (a working title if necessary)
* Type (tutorial, workshop, case study, etc.)
* Duration (45/90 min)
* Speaker name(s)
* Speaker biography (max 150 words)
* Description (approx 250 words)

Proposals about specific products and technologies will be taken under
consideration only if they are open source and available for free (at 
least for
non-commercial use). If you are interested in talking about a proprietary
technology, there is the possibility of "sponsored sessions" which are
presented outside the standard conference schedule. Please, email
conference accu.org for more information.

If you are interested in knowing more about the conference you may
like to consult the website for previous years' editions at
www.accu.org/conference for background information.

Speakers running one or more full 90 minute sessions receive a
special conference attendance package including free attendance, and
assistance with their travel and accommodation costs. Speakers filling
a 45 minute slot qualify for free conference attendance on the day of
their session.

The conference has always benefited from the strength of its
programme, making it the highlight of the year for many
attendees. Please help us make 2010 another successful event.

I'm looking forward to seeing you there,
Giovanni Asproni
ACCU 2010 Conference Chair
Jul 19 2009
parent reply bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Andrei Alexandrescu:
 So I compel you to think of submitting a talk proposal.<

Do you have ideas/suggestions for our possible topics to write talks about? Bye, bearophile
Jul 20 2009
parent reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
bearophile wrote:
 Andrei Alexandrescu:
 So I compel you to think of submitting a talk proposal.<

Do you have ideas/suggestions for our possible topics to write talks about?

Good question. A great starting point for figuring out the style is perusing the schedule of past ACCU conferences at www.accu.org. A few suggestions off the top of my head: * Focus on one feature of D and explain it in depth. Example: "String mixins: the assembly language of generative programming". Wow that's such a cool topic. Example: "Template lalaland: a comparison of Java, C#, C++, and D template mechanisms" * Pick a design technique or pattern and illustrate it with D code (and/or code from other languages). Example: "Hot patching in D: how to make a compiled language act as an interpreter". * This particular conference's focus is on testing, so anything interesting related to it would be welcome. Example: "Beyond unittests: systematic testing and coverage techniques for the D programming language and beyond" * Concurrency is always a popular topic. * I've given an immutability in D talk in 2008, but I feel there's more interesting stuff to be said. * The ACCU crowd is always interested in methodology talks, something that I'm not an expert in. But if you are, go for it. Example: "How RUP, Agile, XP, and waterfall can save the day if used together" * Talking about a particular library or framework is always very popular. Example: "Dux: A High-Performance windowing/building/constraint solving/matrix/math/logging/networking/persistence/you got the idea library for D" Andrei
Jul 20 2009
parent reply Michel Fortin <michel.fortin michelf.com> writes:
On 2009-07-20 17:30:19 -0400, Andrei Alexandrescu 
<SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> said:

 * Talking about a particular library or framework is always very 
 popular. Example: "Dux: A High-Performance 
 windowing/building/constraint 
 solving/matrix/math/logging/networking/persistence/you got the idea 
 library for D"

I've been wondering if a talk about how I built a bridge between D and Objective-C would be interesting: an explanation of how each successive template layer improves on the previous one, working for making it easy and safe to use at the end. Since the bridge is all written in D, it'd be a showcase for D templates and mixins, and for the limited compile-time reflexion from D1 that's needed. It'd also be an introduction to the Objective-C runtime and how two languages can be made to pass objects and throw exceptions at each other seamlessly. All this in one package (but is 90 minutes enough?). That said, even if it's an interesting subject, I'm not sure I'm fluent enough in english, and I'm not much interested in defraying the cost to go there either, and I'm not sure of how much time I'll have to prepare it. -- Michel Fortin michel.fortin michelf.com http://michelf.com/
Jul 20 2009
parent reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
Michel Fortin wrote:
 On 2009-07-20 17:30:19 -0400, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> said:
 
 * Talking about a particular library or framework is always very 
 popular. Example: "Dux: A High-Performance 
 windowing/building/constraint 
 solving/matrix/math/logging/networking/persistence/you got the idea 
 library for D"

I've been wondering if a talk about how I built a bridge between D and Objective-C would be interesting: an explanation of how each successive template layer improves on the previous one, working for making it easy and safe to use at the end. Since the bridge is all written in D, it'd be a showcase for D templates and mixins, and for the limited compile-time reflexion from D1 that's needed. It'd also be an introduction to the Objective-C runtime and how two languages can be made to pass objects and throw exceptions at each other seamlessly. All this in one package (but is 90 minutes enough?).

Seems to be an interesting topic. Any time is enough for the right level of detail.
 That said, even if it's an interesting subject, I'm not sure I'm fluent 
 enough in english, and I'm not much interested in defraying the cost to 
 go there either, and I'm not sure of how much time I'll have to prepare it.

As always there are many reasons for which something cannot be done, and there's one good reason for which something can, which is your desire to do it and overcome difficulties. When I landed in the States in January 1998 I had studied virtually no English, and K&R, Stroustrup and Hollywood movies had been pretty much all my resources; to this day I have not taken one class of English at any level. By any reasonable estimation, a book project would have simply been out of the question. Andrei
Jul 20 2009
parent reply Michel Fortin <michel.fortin michelf.com> writes:
On 2009-07-20 23:12:00 -0400, Andrei Alexandrescu 
<SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> said:

 Michel Fortin wrote:
 On 2009-07-20 17:30:19 -0400, Andrei Alexandrescu 
 <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> said:
 
 * Talking about a particular library or framework is always very 
 popular. Example: "Dux: A High-Performance 
 windowing/building/constraint 
 solving/matrix/math/logging/networking/persistence/you got the idea 
 library for D"

I've been wondering if a talk about how I built a bridge between D and Objective-C would be interesting: an explanation of how each successive template layer improves on the previous one, working for making it easy and safe to use at the end. Since the bridge is all written in D, it'd be a showcase for D templates and mixins, and for the limited compile-time reflexion from D1 that's needed. It'd also be an introduction to the Objective-C runtime and how two languages can be made to pass objects and throw exceptions at each other seamlessly. All this in one package (but is 90 minutes enough?).

Seems to be an interesting topic. Any time is enough for the right level of detail.
 That said, even if it's an interesting subject, I'm not sure I'm fluent 
 enough in english, and I'm not much interested in defraying the cost to 
 go there either, and I'm not sure of how much time I'll have to prepare 
 it.

As always there are many reasons for which something cannot be done, and there's one good reason for which something can, which is your desire to do it and overcome difficulties. When I landed in the States in January 1998 I had studied virtually no English, and K&R, Stroustrup and Hollywood movies had been pretty much all my resources; to this day I have not taken one class of English at any level. By any reasonable estimation, a book project would have simply been out of the question.

Well, I'm better off than you were then. I'm pretty good at writing english, and although I'm able to speak and being understood I guess I just have not enough practice to be confident. -- Michel Fortin michel.fortin michelf.com http://michelf.com/
Jul 21 2009
parent BCS <ao pathlink.com> writes:
Reply to Michel,

 Well, I'm better off than you were then. I'm pretty good at writing
 english, and although I'm able to speak and being understood I guess I
 just have not enough practice to be confident.

I'm a native English speaker and I don't have enough practice to be confident in a presentation. The only way to get that confidence seems to be to real world practice.
Jul 21 2009