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digitalmars.D - Survey - what language are you coming from?

reply Walter Bright <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

Asm?
C++?
C?
None (D's your first language)?
Java?
C#?
Python?
Lisp?
Ruby?
Delphi?
Perl?
Cobol? <g>
Jan 02 2007
next sibling parent David Gileadi <foo bar.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Primarily Java, at least recently. I figure lurkers are included in this survey :)
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply BCS <nothing pathlink.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 

basic / c / c++ I would have done ASM (and still want to) but I can't seem to find references.
Jan 02 2007
next sibling parent reply "bls" <killing__Zoe web.de> writes:
Have a look at Prof. Randy H.(frankly forget his correct name)  HLA  High
level Asm. and his online book The Art of ASM programming. Very readable !
hth bjoern
 I would have done ASM (and still want to) but I can't seem to find
 references.

Jan 02 2007
parent Tyro <nospam home.com> writes:
That would be Randall Hyde.

His website is here: webster.cs.ucr.edu
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling parent "Tomas Lindquist Olsen" <tomas famolsen.dk> writes:
BCS wrote:

 Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it
 would be   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language
 was your  primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of
 you are handy  with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know
 the primary one.
 

basic / c / c++ I would have done ASM (and still want to) but I can't seem to find references.

I you mean X86 assembler, then "PC Assembly Language" http://www.drpaulcarter.com/pcasm/ is pretty good IMHO, and it's available to download for free.
Jan 08 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

My programming language journey: Java (School) -> C# -> D I would say D is now my native language, with C# still easy to slip back into.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "bls" <killing__Zoe web.de> writes:
Modula, Oberon, ( 4GLs...) and still convinced that you have borrowed some
ideas from Mr. Wirth. <g> Well done! Can not resist... what about nested
modules in 2.0?
Bjoern

"Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> schreef in bericht
news:enepvj$20iq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Alexander Panek <a.panek brainsware.org> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Assembler, C, C#
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Tom S <h3r3tic remove.mat.uni.torun.pl> writes:
 I just want to know the primary one.

C++ -- Tomasz Stachowiak
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Gregor Richards <Richards codu.org> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

I'd say I'm still a C and C++'er before a D'er, but that's at least partially because of momentum. I have too many projects written in C and C++ to go D'ifying everything :) - Gregor Richards
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent John Reimer <terminal.node gmail.com> writes:
What?

All I remember is D now. ;)

-JJR
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent mike <vertex gmx.at> writes:
Am 03.01.2007, 00:29 Uhr, schrieb Walter Bright  =

<newshound digitalmars.com>:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed  =

 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would b=

   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your  =

 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are hand=

 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Favorite language: Basic -> Pascal -> C -> C++ -> D Primary tool: Basic -> Pascal -> C -> C++/Tk -> VBA/PHP/Java/Javascript... and does SQ= L, = HTML etc. count? :) It's funny that as long as I you're a hobbyist your main tool and favori= te = language are the same. BTW: I forgot an Option Explicit today ... oh, ho= w = much I hate VB. -mike -- = Erstellt mit Operas revolution=E4rem E-Mail-Modul: http://www.opera.com/= mail/
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Tyro <nospam home.com> writes:
My Journey:

    D -> C++ :( -> D
Jan 02 2007
next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
Tyro wrote:
 My Journey:
 
     D -> C++ :( -> D

That's my favorite reply so far <g>. Thanks for the good chuckle.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling parent Alexander Panek <a.panek brainsware.org> writes:
Tyro wrote:
 My Journey:
 
     D -> C++ :( -> D

Aahahaaha.. "Fatal Tragedy" & "Finally Free" to comment this statement with two great songs of Dream Theater. :D
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "JohnC" <johnch_atms hotmail.com> writes:
"Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> wrote in message 
news:enepvj$20iq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your primary 
tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy with 
multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

C++ But I recall programming my Sega SC-3000 in Basic, and later at high school commanding a "turtle" around the screen with the Logo language. Those were the days!
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
JohnC wrote:
 
 But I recall programming my Sega SC-3000 in Basic, and later at high school 
 commanding a "turtle" around the screen with the Logo language. Those were 
 the days! 

Ah, the Logo hokey-pokey: FD 100 BK 100 FD 100 RT 90 LT 90 BK 100 RT 720 And that's what it's all about :-p Sean (it's been a long day)
Jan 02 2007
next sibling parent Gregor Kopp <gregor.kopp chello.at> writes:
Sean Kelly schrieb:
 JohnC wrote:
 
 But I recall programming my Sega SC-3000 in Basic, and later at high 
 school commanding a "turtle" around the screen with the Logo language. 
 Those were the days! 

Ah, the Logo hokey-pokey: FD 100 BK 100 FD 100 RT 90 LT 90 BK 100 RT 720 And that's what it's all about :-p Sean (it's been a long day)

mwahahaa :D Logo is cool stuff! Try this one: loop 10 loop 36 forward 10 right 10 loopend right 36 loopend here: http://kaminari.scitec.kobe-u.ac.jp/java/logo/
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling parent Stewart Gordon <smjg_1998 yahoo.com> writes:
Sean Kelly wrote:
 JohnC wrote:
 But I recall programming my Sega SC-3000 in Basic, and later at high 
 school commanding a "turtle" around the screen with the Logo language. 
 Those were the days! 

Ah, the Logo hokey-pokey:

ObD: fd 200 rt 90 fd 30 rt 90 pu fd 30 pd fd 70 arc 180 70 arc 180 100 fd 70 pu fd 30 rt 90 pd fd 30 rt 135 pu fd 20 setfloodcolor [255 0 0] fill (Note: a few of these commands aren't standard Logo, but MswLogo.) Stewart.
Jan 05 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
C++
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Serg Kovrov <kovrov no.spam> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

- C++ - PHP (not anymore) - Python -- serg.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Derek Parnell <derek nomail.afraid.org> writes:
On Tue, 02 Jan 2007 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright wrote:

 I just want to know the primary one.

Tough ;-) There is no simple 'primary' one. Current Primary: OpenEdge (last 10 years) ( http://www.progress.com/openedge/products/openedge_10_1b/index.ssp ) Almost primary: Euphoria, Visual Basic 6.0, C Past Primarys: Asm (IBM 370, x86, VAX, Motorola 68000 series) COBOL, PL/I, RPGII, Forth, C++, Pascal/Delphi, IBM 1440 Autocoder, BOSS COBOL, REXX, IBM U2 ( http://www-306.ibm.com/software/data/u2/ ), VAXTPU -- Derek (skype: derek.j.parnell) Melbourne, Australia "Down with mediocrity!" 3/01/2007 11:00:51 AM
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Johan Granberg <lijat.meREM OVE.gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

C++ (and java in school)
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Kirk McDonald <kirklin.mcdonald gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

Python. In fact, I'd still call Python my primary language. Before Python, I used C++ primarily. -- Kirk McDonald Pyd: Wrapping Python with D http://pyd.dsource.org
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "nobody_" <spam spam.spam> writes:
C 
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Tyler Knott <tywebmail mailcity.com> writes:
C.  I got a beginners book on it in 8th grade which really increased my 
interest in programming (before that I had played with VB6... but that 
was VB6).  Then, right around the time I first heard about D I learned 
about OOP and couldn't go back to straight C.  D is so far the cleanest 
and richest language I've played with that incorporated OOP; others have 
included Java and C#, which I disliked for requiring massive VMs and not 
having first-class functions, and C++, which I detested for its class 
definition syntax and header files.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Wolven <rma wolven.net> writes:
RPG III, RPG400, Visual RPG(Caviar)
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Stephen Waits <steve waits.net> writes:
Primary: C++

Others: Ruby, C, MIPS Assembly, and if I'm forced, Python and Perl
Inactive: BASIC, Turbo Pascal, Ada, x86 Assembly

--Steve
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Pablo Ripolles <in-call gmx.net> writes:
== Quote from Walter Bright (newshound digitalmars.com)'s article
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

little C but lots of Fortran 90/95 and Python, essentially for scientific computing and visualization (numerical simulation)
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Walter Bright <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
Pablo Ripolles wrote:
 little C but lots of Fortran 90/95 and Python, essentially for scientific
 computing and visualization (numerical simulation)

I'm glad to see Fortran represented here!
Jan 02 2007
next sibling parent reply "bls" <killing__Zoe web.de> writes:
Fortran rules, allways good to see a language without having any features
(difficult things like recursion. ..Allways good to keep this stuff away
from math !)
is able to survive.    Men I mean we are not working on a PDP11  anymore!

At least some hope for D     <vvbg>  .
Bjoern

"Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> schreef in bericht
news:enf3j2$2cst$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Pablo Ripolles wrote:
 little C but lots of Fortran 90/95 and Python, essentially for


 computing and visualization (numerical simulation)

I'm glad to see Fortran represented here!

Jan 02 2007
next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
bls wrote:
 Fortran rules, allways good to see a language without having any features
 (difficult things like recursion. ..Allways good to keep this stuff away
 from math !)
 is able to survive.    Men I mean we are not working on a PDP11  anymore!
 
 At least some hope for D     <vvbg>  .
 Bjoern

I used to do Fortran on an 11! Let's see. I started with BASIC on something called a "Business 6" computer, perhaps I got the name wrong. Programmed it with punch card decks. Wish I'd kept one of my old card decks! Upgraded to Basic on a PDP-10. Rapidly outgrew that, went on to FORTRAN-10, MACRO-10, then 6800 asm, 6502 asm, that crazy 10 bit byte CPU I forgot the name of in the Mattel Intellivision, Pascal, FORTRAN-11, MACRO-11, swore off computers, 8088 asm, C, C++, Java, Javascript, D. Notably absent is Lisp. I did some emacs lisp programming, but never liked it and never got the hang of it.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling parent Pablo Ripolles <in-call gmx.net> writes:
== Quote from bls (killing__Zoe web.de)'s article
 Fortran rules, allways good to see a language without having any features
 (difficult things like recursion. ..Allways good to keep this stuff away
 from math !)
 is able to survive.

Fortran 90/95 has recursion.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Waldemar <waldemar wa-ba.com> writes:
I'm a bottoms up guy:

ASM (various + microcode), C, C++, Python

D is not there yet, only for fast testers at the moment.

Na zdrowie!
Jan 02 2007
parent Xinok <xnknet gmail.com> writes:
Coming from C++. I don't really know any other language well.
Before C++, I used a program called Multimedia Fusion. While it doesn't use a
typed language, in a way it still is programming.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling parent Pablo Ripolles <in-call gmx.net> writes:
== Quote from Walter Bright (newshound digitalmars.com)'s article
 Pablo Ripolles wrote:
 little C but lots of Fortran 90/95 and Python, essentially for scientific
 computing and visualization (numerical simulation)


C was the first language I started with, I just played a bit with it. I must say that I am mainly into the research and development of "good" and "stable" designs for PDE solvers (Fluid Mechanics/CFD, Solid Mechanics/CSM,...). In this context performance is critical. It's so critical that the general tendency is to let design related goals (maintainability, extendability,...) completely aside. I am sick of the often seen, unbearable, inflexible and old fashioned "simulation codes" that sadly tend to become "legacy codes"... if ever producing some legacy I choose legacy design. Donald Knuth once stated "Premature optimization is the root of all evil". The classical expectation that at the lower levels (leafs) of the "calling tree" you barely need abstraction and therefore anything might be implemented (without twisting design) using elementary language constructs just fails. In this state of mind my journey has been: Fortran 77 -> Fortran 90/95 -> Fortran 2003? (still waiting for acceptable implementation) -> Python (Multiparadigm, abstract enough and brilliant ascetics but too slow) -> D (Multiparadigm, abstract enough and FAST!) PyD becomes crucial for the _late optimizations_ of my legacy Python designs. Why not C++? I was reluctantly about to stick my heat into it when I discovered :D
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

I'm coming from C (with 68K and PPC Asm in). Hoping for D instead of C++ and Objective-C, (or the Perl/Ruby and Java/.NET languages... But I don't consider D in the same "section" as those scripting and managed alternatives?) But my primary tool was (and it still is) C. --anders
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Ary Manzana <ary esperanto.org.ar> writes:
Walter Bright escribió:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

In order of time spent programming: Java PHP C# C++ ASM (just for a project in university)
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Mike Parker <aldacron71 yahoo.com> writes:
C and Java are both primaries for me, depending on the project. We go 
way back.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Mark Wrenn <mark binarytheory.com> writes:
On Tue, 02 Jan 2007 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright wrote:

 I just want to know the primary one.

C/C++
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Kazuhiro Inaba <kiki kmonos.net> writes:
C/C++ is the primary one for me.

-- 
k.inaba / $B0pMU0l9 (B (http://www.kmonos.net)
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent kmk <kmkozan hotmail.com> writes:
Java
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Witold Baryluk <baryluk mpi.int.pl> writes:
Current primary one: D

 I just want to know the primary one.

Primary before D:C IMHO about 1M LOC.
 I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages,

My history of favorite languages: Pascal -> C -> PHP(+sql) -> C -> Python -> C -> D And lots of another: Especially: Perl, Bash, Erlang, Nemerle, Java, C++, Fortran 77/90 depending on project, needs and coworkers. Sometimes (rarely, circa 400 lines totally): JavaScript, Basic (maybe even before pascal :D), LISP, Assembler x86, C#, Sather, OCaml, Haskell. That all :) (i don't count TeX, xhtml, makefiles, and other simple things ;D) -- Witold Baryluk
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Clay Smith <clayasaurus gmai.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

C++
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Chris Nicholson-Sauls <ibisbasenji gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Life took me along this twisty road: # ,-> D # ,-> C -> Python < # BASIC/1a -> C++ -> Java < `-> Ruby # `-> PHP Ack! (I left out some things...) I guess I'd claim C/C++, though. And I'm now perfectly happy with D and Ruby. (Now just to get the two of them playing along together...) -- Chris Nicholson-Sauls
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would 
 be  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are 
 handy with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary 
 one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Life took me along this twisty road: # ,-> D # ,-> C -> Python < # BASIC/1a -> C++ -> Java < `-> Ruby # `-> PHP Ack! (I left out some things...) I guess I'd claim C/C++, though. And I'm now perfectly happy with D and Ruby. (Now just to get the two of them playing along together...) -- Chris Nicholson-Sauls

Perhaps once PyD is rock solid, Kirk could take a crack at RuD? (Rudy?) (RubyD?) The problem is roughly equivalent, allowing for eccentricities in their respective C API's.
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Kirk McDonald <kirklin.mcdonald gmail.com> writes:
Kyle Furlong wrote:
 Perhaps once PyD is rock solid, Kirk could take a crack at RuD? (Rudy?) 
 (RubyD?) The problem is roughly equivalent, allowing for eccentricities 
 in their respective C API's.

I've looked at doing this, actually. Two things stand in my way, both surmountable: (1) I don't know Ruby or, by extension, the Ruby C API very well. The documentation for it isn't very good either. (Of course, the same could be said about parts of the Python/C API.) I am simply not as into Ruby as I am into Python. (2) There are no complete D bindings for the Ruby API, and I don't really have the patience to write them. Though much of the API can be automatically bound with htod or BCD (and I have an htod version around here somewhere), portions of it consist of macros or macro functions that can't be automatically converted. Deja Augustine and David Rushby had already written the Python/C bindings before I ever started Pyd, and my interest in writing a "Rudy"-type project would be greatly improved if I didn't have to do the drudge work of writing the bindings. -- Kirk McDonald Pyd: Wrapping Python with D http://pyd.dsource.org
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Chris Nicholson-Sauls <ibisbasenji gmail.com> writes:
Kirk McDonald wrote:
 Kyle Furlong wrote:
 Perhaps once PyD is rock solid, Kirk could take a crack at RuD? 
 (Rudy?) (RubyD?) The problem is roughly equivalent, allowing for 
 eccentricities in their respective C API's.

I've looked at doing this, actually. Two things stand in my way, both surmountable: (1) I don't know Ruby or, by extension, the Ruby C API very well. The documentation for it isn't very good either. (Of course, the same could be said about parts of the Python/C API.) I am simply not as into Ruby as I am into Python. (2) There are no complete D bindings for the Ruby API, and I don't really have the patience to write them. Though much of the API can be automatically bound with htod or BCD (and I have an htod version around here somewhere), portions of it consist of macros or macro functions that can't be automatically converted. Deja Augustine and David Rushby had already written the Python/C bindings before I ever started Pyd, and my interest in writing a "Rudy"-type project would be greatly improved if I didn't have to do the drudge work of writing the bindings.

Actually I think "Rudy" is a cute name for it. Although it might lead to "Rudolph" jokes... so be it. We'll just make its mascot a reindeer and be done with it. In all seriousness, perhaps a project could be started to this end? I'm sure there would be others (myself included) willing to donate a little time to writing bindings and working out how best to hook it up. Then with your experience from working on PyD, and general Ruby users' enthusiasm, we might just cook up something tasty. :) -- Chris Nicholson-Sauls
Jan 02 2007
next sibling parent reply Walter Bright <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Actually I think "Rudy" is a cute name for it.  Although it might lead 
 to "Rudolph" jokes... so be it.  We'll just make its mascot a reindeer 
 and be done with it.

"Rudy" is perfect.
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Don Clugston <dac nospam.com.au> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Actually I think "Rudy" is a cute name for it.  Although it might lead 
 to "Rudolph" jokes... so be it.  We'll just make its mascot a reindeer 
 and be done with it.

"Rudy" is perfect.

"Rubidium" was another one that comes to mind.
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Chris Nicholson-Sauls <ibisbasenji gmail.com> writes:
Don Clugston wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Actually I think "Rudy" is a cute name for it.  Although it might 
 lead to "Rudolph" jokes... so be it.  We'll just make its mascot a 
 reindeer and be done with it.

"Rudy" is perfect.

"Rubidium" was another one that comes to mind.

I thought of that, as it sticks with the gemstone idiom of Ruby at large (it even sounds like the words "Ruby" + "idiom", heh).. but just couldn't escape the novelty of "Rudy." Sounds like a case for a poll. -- Chris Nicholson-Sauls
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Don Clugston wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Actually I think "Rudy" is a cute name for it.  Although it might 
 lead to "Rudolph" jokes... so be it.  We'll just make its mascot a 
 reindeer and be done with it.

"Rudy" is perfect.

"Rubidium" was another one that comes to mind.

I thought of that, as it sticks with the gemstone idiom of Ruby at large (it even sounds like the words "Ruby" + "idiom", heh).. but just couldn't escape the novelty of "Rudy." Sounds like a case for a poll.

I read it as "Ruby Diem," which is kind of a nice play on words too :-) Sean
Jan 02 2007
parent Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Sean Kelly wrote:
 Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Don Clugston wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 Chris Nicholson-Sauls wrote:
 Actually I think "Rudy" is a cute name for it.  Although it might 
 lead to "Rudolph" jokes... so be it.  We'll just make its mascot a 
 reindeer and be done with it.

"Rudy" is perfect.

"Rubidium" was another one that comes to mind.

I thought of that, as it sticks with the gemstone idiom of Ruby at large (it even sounds like the words "Ruby" + "idiom", heh).. but just couldn't escape the novelty of "Rudy." Sounds like a case for a poll.

I read it as "Ruby Diem," which is kind of a nice play on words too :-) Sean

Either one is catchy, the product is more important though, i.e., *someone write the bindings*.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling parent Jeff M <jeff jeffrules.com> writes:
On 2007-01-02 21:34:41 -0800, Chris Nicholson-Sauls 
<ibisbasenji gmail.com> said:

 Kirk McDonald wrote:
 Kyle Furlong wrote:
 Perhaps once PyD is rock solid, Kirk could take a crack at RuD? (Rudy?) 
 (RubyD?) The problem is roughly equivalent, allowing for eccentricities 
 in their respective C API's.

I've looked at doing this, actually. Two things stand in my way, both surmountable: (1) I don't know Ruby or, by extension, the Ruby C API very well. The documentation for it isn't very good either. (Of course, the same could be said about parts of the Python/C API.) I am simply not as into Ruby as I am into Python. (2) There are no complete D bindings for the Ruby API, and I don't really have the patience to write them. Though much of the API can be automatically bound with htod or BCD (and I have an htod version around here somewhere), portions of it consist of macros or macro functions that can't be automatically converted. Deja Augustine and David Rushby had already written the Python/C bindings before I ever started Pyd, and my interest in writing a "Rudy"-type project would be greatly improved if I didn't have to do the drudge work of writing the bindings.

Actually I think "Rudy" is a cute name for it. Although it might lead to "Rudolph" jokes... so be it. We'll just make its mascot a reindeer and be done with it. In all seriousness, perhaps a project could be started to this end? I'm sure there would be others (myself included) willing to donate a little time to writing bindings and working out how best to hook it up. Then with your experience from working on PyD, and general Ruby users' enthusiasm, we might just cook up something tasty. :) -- Chris Nicholson-Sauls

Rudy is good. I think that "Ruddy" would be a better pronunciation, though :-) -- Jeff
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Chris Miller" <chris dprogramming.com> writes:
Mostly C.

VB -> C++ -> C -> D
with a mix of some of: asm, PHP, C# and others


VB was mostly a waste of time.
C++ was *cool* but it's pretty messed up.
C is still my favorite language but it's not always practical; it's  
showing its age. It encourages mistakes.
D is usually the best tradeoff. It's not perfect, but it's safe and fast  
(to code and execute) with no dependencies.

- Chris
www.dprogramming.com
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Carlos Santander <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright escribió:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Basic (GW-Basic, Q[uick]Basic, Visual Basic) -- Carlos Santander Bernal
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Frits van Bommel <fvbommel REMwOVExCAPSs.nl> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

I'm a recovered C++ programmer :). Before that, I mostly used Java with a side-trip into Python. Less important influences: I started out on Basic (QBasic, VB/Dos, VB/Win 3-5) but that's hardly relevant anymore. Used VB.NET for a school project last year (not my choice; we got an existing program written in VB6 & converted to .NET before adding features. I believe nightmare is the correct term, but that may have had a lot to do with the original code base as well). I've also used Pascal for a while (Turbo & Delphi) but not for anything big (mostly school work and a programming competition). I'm sure I forgot to mention some languages I tried out but didn't use for any length of time. [1]: Well technically it was on Windows 9x, but...
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Jeff M <jeff jeffrules.com> writes:
On 2007-01-02 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright <newshound digitalmars.com> said:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

My primary language is PHP, but I have a good knowledge of the following languages: * PHP (including PHP Internals) * C * C++ * C# * ECMAScript * SQL At one time I knew these languages: * Perl * Java I've been learning D for the past two weeks. It's like C++ except that it doesn't make me want to shove knitting needles into my eyes. -- Jeff
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Jeff M wrote:
 On 2007-01-02 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright <newshound digitalmars.com> 
 said:
 
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would 
 be   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are 
 handy with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary 
 one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

My primary language is PHP, but I have a good knowledge of the following languages: * PHP (including PHP Internals) * C * C++ * C# * ECMAScript * SQL At one time I knew these languages: * Perl * Java I've been learning D for the past two weeks. It's like C++ except that it doesn't make me want to shove knitting needles into my eyes. -- Jeff

I love these newcomer anecdotes. :D
Jan 02 2007
parent reply Bruno Medeiros <brunodomedeiros+spam com.gmail> writes:
Kyle Furlong wrote:
 Jeff M wrote:
 On 2007-01-02 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright 
 <newshound digitalmars.com> said:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would 
 be   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are 
 handy with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the 
 primary one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

My primary language is PHP, but I have a good knowledge of the following languages: * PHP (including PHP Internals) * C * C++ * C# * ECMAScript * SQL At one time I knew these languages: * Perl * Java I've been learning D for the past two weeks. It's like C++ except that it doesn't make me want to shove knitting needles into my eyes. -- Jeff

I love these newcomer anecdotes. :D

When commenting about C++ to coder friends I usually describe it as making me "want to dig inside my skull and scrape out the pain." (It's a phrase I took from an excellent noir story) -- Bruno Medeiros - MSc in CS/E student http://www.prowiki.org/wiki4d/wiki.cgi?BrunoMedeiros#D
Jan 05 2007
parent Don Clugston <dac nospam.com.au> writes:
Bruno Medeiros wrote:
 Kyle Furlong wrote:
 Jeff M wrote:
 On 2007-01-02 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright 
 <newshound digitalmars.com> said:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would 
 be   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was 
 your primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you 
 are handy with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the 
 primary one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

My primary language is PHP, but I have a good knowledge of the following languages: * PHP (including PHP Internals) * C * C++ * C# * ECMAScript * SQL At one time I knew these languages: * Perl * Java I've been learning D for the past two weeks. It's like C++ except that it doesn't make me want to shove knitting needles into my eyes. -- Jeff

I love these newcomer anecdotes. :D

When commenting about C++ to coder friends I usually describe it as making me "want to dig inside my skull and scrape out the pain." (It's a phrase I took from an excellent noir story)

I feel that way about VBA's bug-oriented programming -- any old garbage will compile without complaint. The way that compiler bugs can corrupt your *source code* is just brilliant.
Jan 09 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Java. But now, thanks to D (and lot of C coding as well), I hate Java. D and C are now my favorites. -- ~John Demme me teqdruid.com http://www.teqdruid.com/
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Jarrett Billingsley" <kb3ctd2 yahoo.com> writes:
"Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> wrote in message 
news:enepvj$20iq$1 digitaldaemon.com...

            -> Blitz3D
DarkBasic <
            -> C++ -> D

I wouldn't really say I got good at programming until D though.  I still use 
Blitz3D for fun things :) 
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Alan Knowles <alan akbkhome.com> writes:
PHP/JS - for paying the rent...
C/C++/C#/Java/Python/Lisp/Perl/Pike/6502Assembly - occasionally over the
years..

Regards
Alan

Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Rod Haper <rhaper houston.rr.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

My at work (i.e., pay the bills) usage is pretty evenly split between C and Python. D gives me an interesting blend of the two plus much more.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Bill Baxter <dnewsgroup billbaxter.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

I've been doing mostly C++ for about 10 years. --bb
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Miles <_______ _______.____> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 But still, it would be useful (in writing documentation) to know what
 language was your primary tool before coming to D.

I code in a lot of languages, from PIC assembly to JavaScript, but in the field that D fits in, my current primary tool is C/C++. I didn't switch to D yet, since D still lacks a good standard library, good debugger support and a GUI toolkit.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Brad Roberts <braddr puremagic.com> writes:
On Tue, 2 Jan 2007, Walter Bright wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
 useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your primary 
 tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy with 
 multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

c (and really C, not just a standard pat answer of c/c++), c++ primarily perl, bash secondarily java a tad pascal, asm, fortran (missing from your list) in professional capacities at one point or another though none in the last 10 years. Later, Brad
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent janderson <askme me.com> writes:
c++

Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Don Clugston <dac nospam.com.au> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

C++.
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent nazo <lovesyao gmail.com> writes:
VBA for Excel -> XUL + Javascript (ECMAScript 3 / prototype oriented) -> 
C# -> D

I think that documentation for Javascript programmers is necessary.


# Other novel languages that I'm interesting: Ada, Eiffel, Ruby and 
Javascript 2.0(Ecmascript 4)
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Tiberiu Gal" <galtiberiu.backspace gmail.com> writes:
On Wed, 03 Jan 2007 01:29:03 +0200, Walter Bright  
<newshound digitalmars.com> wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed  
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be  
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your  
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy  
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

PHP and VBA, in other words D is my first programming language -- Tiberiu Gal
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Ivan Senji <ivan.senji gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

C++
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent catrino <catrino cbs.cnrs.fr> writes:
Languages I use most of the time :
C - FORTRAN 77 - JAVA
FORTRAN 77 is for doing math. I like D because I'm tired of writing glue code
between FORTRAN or C and JAVA and because the object model is similar to JAVA's
one which I believe to be easier to use than C++ one and sufficient for most
purposes.

I use TCL and PYTHON as scripting languages. I often embed an interpreter
(Python
or TCL) in my programs to provide a macro language. It is useful for testing
too.

The only thing that prevents me form using D for everything is the lack of a
good
runtime library that covers most needs (like JAVA's one). I use D for fun and
for
small projects, I don't use it for my job now. I hope to be able to switch to D
in
the future.

Thanks a lot for 1.0 which works fine !

Vincent
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Jeff <jeffrparsons optusnet.com.au> writes:
C++.

I'm sorry, C++; I still love you, but I think we both know we've been 
drifting apart these last few years, and D really understands me...
Jan 02 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Kevin Bealer <kevinbealer gmail.com> writes:
 I just want to know the primary one.

I've mostly used C++, professionally and otherwise. Kevin
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Chad J <gamerChad _spamIsBad_gmail.com> writes:
EasyUO -> BlitzBasic -> C# -> D

Along the way I took side journeys into Java, Pascal, and C++.  I use D 
mostly nowadays, though I could probably slip back into C# if I had to.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply KlausO <oberhofer users.sourceforge.net> writes:
Walter Bright schrieb:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Primary language is C++.
Jan 03 2007
parent KlausO <oberhofer users.sourceforge.net> writes:
KlausO schrieb:
 
 
 Primary language is C++.

As most others include their history, here is mine: C128 basic/6502 ASM Turbo Pascal Delphi C++ at work (mostly COM like stuff), although C# is getting more D currently for private projects only :-(
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Manfred Hansen <m.hansen kielnet.net> writes:
Perl, Java

Manfred
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Aarti_pl <aarti interia.pl> writes:
Walter Bright napisał(a):
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 

I played a little bit with Basic (also VBA) and Pascal. Currently I professionally I work with C++ and in home with D :-) PS. Thanks a lot for D 1.0 ! Regards Marcin Kuszczak http://zapytaj.dlajezusa.pl
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent CyaNox <mark cyanox.nl> writes:
Primary:
PHP (work)
C++ (Home)

History:

gwbasic, quickbasic, VB, C, C++, PHP, D.

With sidesteps to other like perl, python, asm, etc.

I'm not long into D yet about a week or two but seriously ... couldn't D 
be invented like 30 years ago ... would have made several project of 
mine quite a bit more relaxed.

Greetings.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Gregor Kopp <gregor.kopp chello.at> writes:
Ruby


You just wanted to know only the primary one ;)
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent kenny <funisher gmail.com> writes:
My first language (and my favourite) was ASM. I started on the 68HC11, but then
I
moved to intel. I programmed in SpAsm (which is now called RosAsm). Work has
required me to write in PHP, but I don't like it. I'm full time D and php now.

I'll go back to asm when I get a chance. I really enjoyed the syntax of SpAsm
much
more than standard syntax of say FASM or NASM. I may program a patch to D to
support such syntax in the future if I start writing asm again.

kenny
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Serghei Darii" <serge_ds arcor.de> writes:
On Wed, 03 Jan 2007 00:29:03 +0100, Walter Bright  
<newshound digitalmars.com> wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed  
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be  
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your  
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy  
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

c/c++
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Jan Hanselaer" <jan.hanselaer gmail.com> writes:
 I just want to know the primary one.

Java (and for the moment that's still the primary one ... but it might change)
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Daniel Giddings" <daniel.giddings gmail.com> writes:
C++ & Python

D feels very natural coming from using those languages over the last few 
years.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Max Samukha <samukha voliacable.com> writes:
On Tue, 02 Jan 2007 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright
<newshound digitalmars.com> wrote:

I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

Asm?
C++?
C?
None (D's your first language)?
Java?
C#?
Python?
Lisp?
Ruby?
Delphi?
Perl?
Cobol? <g>

C# has been my primary language for 3 years (of pain). Hope i'll never have to use it after Tango (or whatever the D standard library will be) is released.
Jan 03 2007
parent Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Max Samukha wrote:
 On Tue, 02 Jan 2007 15:29:03 -0800, Walter Bright
 <newshound digitalmars.com> wrote:
 
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

C# has been my primary language for 3 years (of pain). Hope i'll never have to use it after Tango (or whatever the D standard library will be) is released.

I hear that.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Christian Kamm" <kamm nospam.de> writes:
 But still, it would be useful (in writing documentation) to know what 
 language was your primary tool before coming to D

C++ Christian
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Lars Ivar Igesund <larsivar igesund.net> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

It's fluctuating between Java and D. A couple of years back it was C/C++. -- Lars Ivar Igesund blog at http://larsivi.net DSource & #D: larsivi
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Tom <ihate spam.com> writes:
C/C++

Regards,
--
Tom;

== Quote from Walter Bright (newshound digitalmars.com)'s article
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Roberto Mariottini <rmariottini mail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 [...]  I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

Java (2003-today) but in the pat it was: C++ (1995-2002) C (1992-1994) Turbo Pascal (1985-1991) Ciao
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Wolfgang Draxinger <wdraxinger darkstargames.de> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special
 breed different from the vast majority of programmers. But
 still, it would be
   useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was
   your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you
 are handy with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know
 the primary one.

1989 BASIC on the C64 ;-) when I got that at the age of 7 Turbo Pascal on my mother's 286 (that was about 1991 IIRC) Oberon on the Amiga (never had an own Amiga though, I had always to ask my frieds to use theirs) ASM of course (x86, M68k, ARM, AVR) C/C++ (Borland C++ and MSVC++ *yuck*) Java - never used it seriously though. When I was seriously interested it was slow like a tombstone and nowadays I prefer for the Java-like Tasks Perl Python Ruby CLisp is a must to make your XEmacs purr. And Lua is my language of chioce when it comes to embedd scriptability into my programs. I have also looked into Erlang, OCaml, Clean and Haskell, but not compiled a single line of code written by me, though some software on my system is written in those. Wolfgang Draxinger -- E-Mail address works, Jabber: hexarith jabber.org, ICQ: 134682867
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Lucas Goss <lgoss007 gmail.com> writes:
All are primary depending on project:

C, C++, ObjC, PHP, EMCAScript, C#
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Glen Perkins <please dontEmail.com> writes:
"I also know that many of you are handy
with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one. "

I no more have a primary language than I have a primary hand tool in my toolbox,
but I get the sense that the real question is something along the lines of: what
language are you considering replacing with D?, or, what language are you
unsatisfied with and thinking of cheating on with D?

For me, D would replace C++, which I use as "a better C". D strikes me as a much
better C than C++. C++'s gotcha-oriented programming is my least favorite among
the major paradigms, and I'm always looking for alternatives.

Like many people, I started substituting Java for C++ when I could get away with
it. Then along came C#, which I substituted for Java when I could. With good GUI
libs, other libs, and an equivalent of C#'s LINQ, I might end up with C++ ->
Java
-> C# -> D, but those arrows have only meant partial replacement so far. I'd be
delighted if D became good enough to allow for full replacement of this chain.

With more functional paradigm support (and libs), I might even be persuaded to
leave Python for D, too, since Guido says he isn't interested in adding more
functional support to Python. Anders Hejlsberg (C#'s main designer) is much more
interested in adding functional support than Guido, so maybe I'll end up
dropping
Python and expanding my use of C#. If D > max(C#, Python), D could end up taking
it all. (Unless of course Paul Graham's Arc turns out to be real after all....)
Jan 03 2007
parent reply Frits van Bommel <fvbommel REMwOVExCAPSs.nl> writes:
Glen Perkins wrote:
 C++'s gotcha-oriented programming

Quite possibly the best description of C++ I've ever seen :).
Jan 03 2007
parent Georg Wrede <georg nospam.org> writes:
Frits van Bommel wrote:
 Glen Perkins wrote:
 
 C++'s gotcha-oriented programming

Quite possibly the best description of C++ I've ever seen :).

Probably, this ought to be chiseled in stone, and hung up above the door to Stroustrup's room. If there ever was a phrase that exactly described my problem with C++, this is it. -- And, while I previously voted "Java was my previous language", the real truth is that I always was dissatisfied with interpreted languages, and the only serious alternative seemed to be C(++), so finding D was like stumbling upon an oasis after 500 miles of biting sand.
Jan 06 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Steve Horne <stephenwantshornenospam100 aol.com> writes:
In recent years, primarily C++.

Previous primary languages (in rough order) have included...

Various Basics
Assembler (6502, 68000, 8086)
COBOL
Borland Turbo Pascal (mainly v4)
Modula 2
C
Ada

Python has had more use than most of these 'primary' languages, but
always as a secondary, occasional-use language - I've just kept on
using it longer than any other language (since version 1.4, which I
used back when my main language was Ada). Despite that, somehow, even
though I have no problems using it, I always seem to have areas of
confusion relating to its semantics.

In truth, D is still the third choice language at the moment. It has
no chance of shifting Python from second place, but it probably will
shift C++ from first place in time. Nothing much you can do to make
the transition go faster, though - I just have this huge library of
heavily used code. Converting takes time, and the interop between D
and C++ necessarily has limits because of the differing semantics.

C# has been significant third-place languages for me in recent years,
but D has already overtaken that.

-- 
Remove 'wants' and 'nospam' from e-mail.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Lionello Lunesu" <lionello lunesu.remove.com> writes:
In cronological order, more stars = more code:

*     Microsoft Basic on MSX 1
**   Microsoft Basic on Commodore 64
**   Asm on Commodore 64 (6510)
**   Turbo Pascal (DOS on an 80286)
*** Asm (DOS, all x86 CPUs)
*     C on PC (DOS)
*** C++ on PC (DOS,Windows)
*     D (Windows)

L. 
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Georg Wrede <georg nospam.org> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

Java. "But there had to be a better way!"
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent David Medlock <noone nowhere.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

I would say C++ was my workhorse language before D, although Delphi is preferred for GUI apps. D is just great Walter, thanks again for this. Even if your plans of world domination don't work out I will enjoy using D. It has its hairy edges but overall it has the right 'feel'. -DavidM
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Pragma <ericanderton yahoo.removeme.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

I cut my teeth on C64 Basic*, and then graduated to Pascal, C, C++ and x86 ASM in that order. My career, however, has taken me down a completely different path. In no particular order: ASP PHP Java C# VisualBasic ColdFusion Javascript Python D pretty much replaced all my other interests in terms of hobby languages starting over 2 years ago. So I'm more fluent in D than in most other languages at this point. Before that, I spent a lot of time hacking in PHP or C#. If I had to pick a primary language focus, I'd have to say D is #1, with Javascript being a solid #2 as of late thanks to the current "Web 2.0" revolution going on out there. (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built to train new coders) -- - EricAnderton at yahoo
Jan 03 2007
parent reply Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
Pragma wrote:
 
 I cut my teeth on C64 Basic*

 (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built to 
 train new coders)

I remember being so excited when the C64 magazines arrived in the mail--a friend and I would spend all day entering the printed code to play the new game they contained. It wasn't my first experience with programming, but it was certainly one of the most significant. Sean
Jan 03 2007
next sibling parent "JohnC" <johnch_atms hotmail.com> writes:
"Sean Kelly" <sean f4.ca> wrote in message 
news:enhbp2$1vpv$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Pragma wrote:
 I cut my teeth on C64 Basic*

 (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built to 
 train new coders)

I remember being so excited when the C64 magazines arrived in the mail--a friend and I would spend all day entering the printed code to play the new game they contained. It wasn't my first experience with programming, but it was certainly one of the most significant. Sean

Remember entering the code for sprites? I'd spend half the morning typing a screenful of 0s and 1s, only to run the thing and discover my sprites were missing a limb or two. But you doggedly persisted, and were so chuffed with the end result, even though none of it was of your own design. I'd love to recapture that feeling.
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Don Clugston <dac nospam.com.au> writes:
Sean Kelly wrote:
 Pragma wrote:
 I cut my teeth on C64 Basic*

 (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built to 
 train new coders)

I remember being so excited when the C64 magazines arrived in the mail--a friend and I would spend all day entering the printed code to play the new game they contained. It wasn't my first experience with programming, but it was certainly one of the most significant. Sean

POKE 53280,0: POKE 53281,0 Those were the days. A lot of my early programming was refactoring the code while typing it in because I was such a slow typist. I never used C64 BASIC much -- I switched to asm very quickly because it was higher level (!) I wrote my own editor/assembler, which let me have labels and variable names more than 2 characters long. It booted off a cassette drive in 15 seconds using a turboload routine (I was too poor to own a disk drive). It's still one of the programs I'm proudest of.
Jan 05 2007
next sibling parent reply Pragma <ericanderton yahoo.removeme.com> writes:
Don Clugston wrote:
 Sean Kelly wrote:
 Pragma wrote:
 I cut my teeth on C64 Basic*

 (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built 
 to train new coders)

I remember being so excited when the C64 magazines arrived in the mail--a friend and I would spend all day entering the printed code to play the new game they contained. It wasn't my first experience with programming, but it was certainly one of the most significant. Sean

POKE 53280,0: POKE 53281,0 Those were the days. A lot of my early programming was refactoring the code while typing it in because I was such a slow typist. I never used C64 BASIC much -- I switched to asm very quickly because it was higher level (!) I wrote my own editor/assembler, which let me have labels and variable names more than 2 characters long. It booted off a cassette drive in 15 seconds using a turboload routine (I was too poor to own a disk drive). It's still one of the programs I'm proudest of.

15 seconds? Now *that's* impressive. I recall waiting for some games to load via tape that took 2-3 *minutes*. -- - EricAnderton at yahoo
Jan 05 2007
parent reply Don Clugston <dac nospam.com.au> writes:
Pragma wrote:
 Don Clugston wrote:
 Sean Kelly wrote:
 Pragma wrote:
 I cut my teeth on C64 Basic*

 (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built 
 to train new coders)

I remember being so excited when the C64 magazines arrived in the mail--a friend and I would spend all day entering the printed code to play the new game they contained. It wasn't my first experience with programming, but it was certainly one of the most significant. Sean

POKE 53280,0: POKE 53281,0 Those were the days. A lot of my early programming was refactoring the code while typing it in because I was such a slow typist. I never used C64 BASIC much -- I switched to asm very quickly because it was higher level (!) I wrote my own editor/assembler, which let me have labels and variable names more than 2 characters long. It booted off a cassette drive in 15 seconds using a turboload routine (I was too poor to own a disk drive). It's still one of the programs I'm proudest of.

15 seconds? Now *that's* impressive. I recall waiting for some games to load via tape that took 2-3 *minutes*.

I had a special 'leaderless' cassette, which didn't have the clear bit at the start. When saving it, I tricked the C64 into beginning to save immediately. To get the 15 seconds timing, you had to press shift-run/stop and PLAY on tape as soon as you flicked the power-on switch; you never saw the power-on screen. The turbo loader was saved inside the filename (filenames could be up to 500 bytes long). The editor/assembler itself was about 3K long, and it used primitive compression. When saving a file, the code for saving was stored on the screen, which meant you could save from any part of RAM; but if you accidentally pressed {CLR/HOME} the C64 would crash once you hit RETURN, because you'd wiped out the code it was executing.
Jan 07 2007
parent Georg Wrede <georg nospam.org> writes:
Don Clugston wrote:
 Pragma wrote:
 
 Don Clugston wrote:

 Sean Kelly wrote:

 Pragma wrote:

 I cut my teeth on C64 Basic*

...
 (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built 
 to train new coders)

I remember being so excited when the C64 magazines arrived in the mail--a friend and I would spend all day entering the printed code to play the new game they contained. It wasn't my first experience with programming, but it was certainly one of the most significant. Sean

POKE 53280,0: POKE 53281,0 Those were the days. A lot of my early programming was refactoring the code while typing it in because I was such a slow typist. I never used C64 BASIC much -- I switched to asm very quickly because it was higher level (!) I wrote my own editor/assembler, which let me have labels and variable names more than 2 characters long. It booted off a cassette drive in 15 seconds using a turboload routine (I was too poor to own a disk drive). It's still one of the programs I'm proudest of.

15 seconds? Now *that's* impressive. I recall waiting for some games to load via tape that took 2-3 *minutes*.

I had a special 'leaderless' cassette, which didn't have the clear bit at the start. When saving it, I tricked the C64 into beginning to save immediately. To get the 15 seconds timing, you had to press shift-run/stop and PLAY on tape as soon as you flicked the power-on switch; you never saw the power-on screen. The turbo loader was saved inside the filename (filenames could be up to 500 bytes long). The editor/assembler itself was about 3K long, and it used primitive compression. When saving a file, the code for saving was stored on the screen, which meant you could save from any part of RAM; but if you accidentally pressed {CLR/HOME} the C64 would crash once you hit RETURN, because you'd wiped out the code it was executing.

Just awesome!
Jan 08 2007
prev sibling parent reply Steve Horne <stephenwantshornenospam100 aol.com> writes:
On Sat, 6 Jan 2007 03:01:51 +0000 (UTC), John Reimer
<terminal.node gmail.com> wrote:

I moved to 6510 assembler eventually and started having fun with raster
interrupts, setting the vic II to operate in different modes on different
scan lines. Those days were so fun! I never got extremely far into such
low-level things, but even the beginnings were full of wonder. :)

For me it was the SID chip and music stuff. At that time I was really ignorant of synthesizer principles, but it was a good way to learn a few basic principles. For my money, the best thing about C64 Basic was that it was so limited. If you wanted to do anything worthwhile, at least if you wanted it to run at a sensible speed, you had to learn assembler. I remember writing my first Brezenhams-algorithm line drawing routine in Commodore Basic and watching the pixels appear pretty much one-by-one! Since I couldn't afford a decent assembler, in my case I ended up with a freebie typed in from a book listing - which turned out to be a good thing, since I could update it myself. -- Remove 'wants' and 'nospam' from e-mail.
Jan 07 2007
parent Don Clugston <dac nospam.com.au> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 On Mon, 08 Jan 2007 00:05:14 +0000, Steve Horne wrote:
 
 On Sat, 6 Jan 2007 03:01:51 +0000 (UTC), John Reimer
 <terminal.node gmail.com> wrote:

 I moved to 6510 assembler eventually and started having fun with raster
 interrupts, setting the vic II to operate in different modes on different
 scan lines. Those days were so fun! I never got extremely far into such
 low-level things, but even the beginnings were full of wonder. :)



Oh yeah! The coolest thing was asking it to shrink the screen at the exact moment when it was drawing that part of the screen. The VIC-II would get confused, and keep displaying the contents of memory location $3FFF, and would let you display sprites in the border. If you did this in the middle of the screen, it used to display character $FF at the end of the line, but I never worked out exactly what was happenning. The unidentified opcodes were great too, trying to work out what was going on inside the CPU. A couple were actually useful.
 For me it was the SID chip and music stuff. At that time I was really
 ignorant of synthesizer principles, but it was a good way to learn a
 few basic principles.

I played with the SID chip a bit, but not very much. I remember a very little about fiddling with attack/decay/sustain/release values.
 For my money, the best thing about C64 Basic was that it was so
 limited. If you wanted to do anything worthwhile, at least if you
 wanted it to run at a sensible speed, you had to learn assembler. I
 remember writing my first Brezenhams-algorithm line drawing routine in
 Commodore Basic and watching the pixels appear pretty much one-by-one!

Yes, the C64 BASIC was quite limited. One had to resort to so many peeks and pokes to do anything substantial that one might as well have learned assembler. I thought I was such a wiz at 15 when I started learning it, although in retrospect I realize I wasn't even close :P.

The C64 BASIC manual explained that the command to do graphics was POKE. Must be one of the worst languages ever made.
 Bresenham in BASIC :), that must have been slow.  The
 bitmapped video had especially wierd memory layout, each location
 mapped to an 8 byte vertical zone much like a single character map, if I
 recall correctly.  This may not have been so unusual at the time, but I
 considered it weird... that is, until I learned about the VGA 16 colour
 modes of the PC :P.

The multicolour mode was definitely weird, though. The meaning of colour #1 depended on the settings in colour RAM.
 Since I couldn't afford a decent assembler, in my case I ended up with a
 freebie typed in from a book listing - which turned out to be a good
 thing, since I could update it myself.

I had purchased the two Compute's Gazette books on assembler. The first merely taught it, and the second guided you through implementing a complete assembler and editor (the red and blue books, I can't remember the names). I never understood the second book at the time, but I think I made use of the assembler/editor from it.

COMPUTE!'s First Book of Machine Code. COMPUTE!'s Second Book of Machine Code. Knew them well :-).
 Later I purchased the Super C system for C64.  That was my first
 introduction to C programming, about 15 years ago now.
 
 -JJR

Jan 07 2007
prev sibling parent Georg Wrede <georg nospam.org> writes:
Sean Kelly wrote:
 Pragma wrote:
 
 I cut my teeth on C64 Basic

 (*I see that I'm not alone here - it's like those things were built to 
 train new coders)

I remember being so excited when the C64 magazines arrived in the mail--a friend and I would spend all day entering the printed code to play the new game they contained. It wasn't my first experience with programming, but it was certainly one of the most significant.

Oh, the days! To date, my biggest computing mistake was to not buy the C64. I had bought the VIC-20, and the 64 came out about a month later. I was always waiting for the follower to the 64, which "never" came. (The 128, years later never proved to be a real successor.) At the time I had two worries: the (Microsoft!!!!) basic on the VIC was pretty arcane, no named subroutines with parameters, no proper renumbering of program lines, not to speak of switch statements and the like. The second worry was, I grew increasingly aware of the need of a formal, academic education in programming. For example, I had read several texts on programming where Recursion was mentioned. But, in all of them the only real example of recursion was the Fibonacci numbers. Not very real-world connected. Stuff like linked lists, priority queues, unrolling versus compiling, were not familiar despite vigorous efforts. My biggest personal feat (IMHO) was when I found an issue of the German CHIP magazine on the newsstand, and it boasted a "relocatable machine code monitor for the C64". They explicitly said it won't work on the VIC-24: too little memory, problems with address space, and of course a different CPU. Earlier I had bought a 16k extension RAM card, mail order from Germany, but the magazine declared I still couldn't use the program on my VIC. (OT: Heh, at the time, one couldn't buy a modem in Germany. They were considered "militarily dubious", or some such, so Germany became the last country in Europe to become "networked". Of course, 15 years later, the Internet simply flooded the continent.) I think I stood some 2 hours at the magazine shelf in the bookstore, and finally decided "it is doable". The program listing was some 8 spreads of tightly typed decimal bytecodes, with an error check code at the end of each line. I had to invent my own input routine because the logic of the C64 routine was dependent "on the length of the self-modifying-code input buffer" or some such (sorry, don't remember the exact details off-hand anymore). Having entered half of the program, I had to save it to cassette tape (I too was too poor to afford a Floppy Drive). Then I entered the other half, saved it on the cassette tape, then I figured out a way to load each half into the same session, and then save them both together on a separate tape cassette. Off hand I don't remeber too many times I've seriously been as proud of myself as when I got the machine code monitor to actually work on my VIC-24 when it really wasn't supposed to be possible. Man, if I could relive that feeling again!!
Jan 06 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Brad Anderson <brad dsource.org> writes:
Before D:
---------
Visual Basic 6 and below
Java

During D: *
---------
Python
Lisp
Javascript
Erlang

BA

* damn, sounds like I'm having an affair or two ;)
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Charlie <charlies nowhere.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Chronological: Perl C++ C PHP D Java Rebol Scheme Primarily: C++ I have been happily using D for systems programming for 4 years :D. Long Live D! Charlie
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Jason Mills <jmills cs.mun.ca> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

C++ and Java
Jan 03 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent EricH <Eric.Heaton.UK -AT-Removegmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Primary Delphi With a good portion of C/C++
Jan 04 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Martin d Anjou <point14 magma.ca> writes:
Asm was too high-level for me -> Verilog.

But after a decade, Verilog became boring -> Vera.

Both these languages excel at bit-level manipulations and at user space 
thread creation/manipulation with their built-in cooperative 
non-preemptive scheduler primitives.

 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Jan 04 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Fredrik Olsson <peylow gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright skrev:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

My hobby trail: Basic -> 68k asm -> Pascal -> D My earn-$-for-a-living trail: Pascal -> VB -> Objective-C -> C My university studies trail: C -> C++ -> Lisp -> Java What I always liked better with Pascal over C was that for the general case it made life much simpler, and code length shorter. And when needed inline asm is just so much better in Pascal. Two treats D give me now; less code, and raw power when I want to, not because I have to. // Fredrik Olsson
Jan 05 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Stewart Gordon <smjg_1998 yahoo.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D.

C++ for some purposes, Java for others. Stewart.
Jan 05 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Bruno Medeiros <brunodomedeiros+spam com.gmail> writes:
C/C++, Java and C#.

C/C++ is the one I'm wanting to be replaced by D.


-- 
Bruno Medeiros - MSc in CS/E student
http://www.prowiki.org/wiki4d/wiki.cgi?BrunoMedeiros#D
Jan 05 2007
parent Stewart Gordon <smjg_1998 yahoo.com> writes:
Bruno Medeiros wrote:
 C/C++, Java and C#.
 
 C/C++ is the one I'm wanting to be replaced by D.

The "one"? Don't C and C++ count as two languages? :-) Stewart.
Jan 05 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent John Reimer <terminal.node gmail.com> writes:
On Fri, 05 Jan 2007 14:00:03 +0100, Don Clugston wrote:

 
 POKE 53280,0: POKE 53281,0
 Those were the days.

Oh... making the background and border black. Those were indeed the days! I moved to 6510 assembler eventually and started having fun with raster interrupts, setting the vic II to operate in different modes on different scan lines. Those days were so fun! I never got extremely far into such low-level things, but even the beginnings were full of wonder. :) -JJR
Jan 05 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Deewiant <deewiant.doesnotlike.spam gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I just want to know the primary one.

Prior to D I would use (read: have used - I didn't do too much "serious" programming) C++ for bigger projects (not too many of those) and Ruby for quick scripts and the like. Nowadays I use D for both. It's the language I'm most proficient in. -- Remove ".doesnotlike.spam" from the mail address.
Jan 06 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent reply renoX <renosky free.fr> writes:
Walter Bright a écrit :
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed 
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be 
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your 
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy 
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.

My primary langage is C. From time to time, I also use shell and Perl (I despise Perl), I did one project in C++ too. If I had the choice, it would be D and Ruby. Scala looks interesting too. renoX
Jan 07 2007
parent Hengky <steelx7000 gmail.com> writes:
My favorite language is Visual Basic 6.0 for Desktop and PHP for Web
Now i still learn D to improve my basic in OOP.
I am interesting in C# for my next web programming with ASP.NET
Also i am interesting with Haxe for SWF Flash
JAVA, C# and D help me a lot in understanding OOP style.
Jan 07 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Lu=EDs_Marques?= <luismarques+spam gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
I just want to know the primary one.

Mostly C now, at work.

Past experiences also included C++, x86 assembly, VB, Java and Python.

Luís
Jan 07 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent John Reimer <terminal.node gmail.com> writes:
On Mon, 08 Jan 2007 00:05:14 +0000, Steve Horne wrote:

 On Sat, 6 Jan 2007 03:01:51 +0000 (UTC), John Reimer
 <terminal.node gmail.com> wrote:
 
I moved to 6510 assembler eventually and started having fun with raster
interrupts, setting the vic II to operate in different modes on different
scan lines. Those days were so fun! I never got extremely far into such
low-level things, but even the beginnings were full of wonder. :)

For me it was the SID chip and music stuff. At that time I was really ignorant of synthesizer principles, but it was a good way to learn a few basic principles.

I played with the SID chip a bit, but not very much. I remember a very little about fiddling with attack/decay/sustain/release values.
 For my money, the best thing about C64 Basic was that it was so
 limited. If you wanted to do anything worthwhile, at least if you
 wanted it to run at a sensible speed, you had to learn assembler. I
 remember writing my first Brezenhams-algorithm line drawing routine in
 Commodore Basic and watching the pixels appear pretty much one-by-one!

Yes, the C64 BASIC was quite limited. One had to resort to so many peeks and pokes to do anything substantial that one might as well have learned assembler. I thought I was such a wiz at 15 when I started learning it, although in retrospect I realize I wasn't even close :P. Bresenham in BASIC :), that must have been slow. The bitmapped video had especially wierd memory layout, each location mapped to an 8 byte vertical zone much like a single character map, if I recall correctly. This may not have been so unusual at the time, but I considered it weird... that is, until I learned about the VGA 16 colour modes of the PC :P.
 Since I couldn't afford a decent assembler, in my case I ended up with a
 freebie typed in from a book listing - which turned out to be a good
 thing, since I could update it myself.

I had purchased the two Compute's Gazette books on assembler. The first merely taught it, and the second guided you through implementing a complete assembler and editor (the red and blue books, I can't remember the names). I never understood the second book at the time, but I think I made use of the assembler/editor from it. Later I purchased the Super C system for C64. That was my first introduction to C programming, about 15 years ago now. -JJR
Jan 07 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Tomas Lindquist Olsen" <tomas famolsen.dk> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 I just want to know the primary one.

C++
Jan 08 2007
prev sibling parent rochus <rochus rochus.net> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 I know you all are early adopters of D, and that's a special breed
 different from the vast majority of programmers. But still, it would be
  useful (in writing documentation) to know what language was your
 primary tool before coming to D. I also know that many of you are handy
 with multiple diverse languages, I just want to know the primary one.
 
 Asm?
 C++?
 C?
 None (D's your first language)?
 Java?
 C#?
 Python?
 Lisp?
 Ruby?
 Delphi?
 Perl?
 Cobol? <g>

Hi, I'd say I'm comming from Delphi, though that's not fully correct because there are lot's of languages I had a look at and with few of them I code different projects. So here are the languges I used to use in order of time spent on them: Delphi - due to my apprenticeship and because I somehow like it. And because the IDE is simply the best! (though D2005 was somewhat slow...) PHP - because I was (am) young and didn't know better. I decline writing PHP these days. PHP is just a big security hole Python - The one and only scripting language. Best documentation, very fast, extensible, very good for agile software dev (e.g. eXtreme Programming) Java - I have to learn at university at the moment. It's nice because of it's platform independence, but this seems to be everything that's good about it. C - To be able to translate .h files to delphi headers ;) or: To understand the linux kernel source and to be able to "talk" to all those others using it... C++ - because I like it the object-oriented way ASM - for a project with some friends building a microkernel that based on asm+pascal There are some more I had an eye on, but those are the ones I used to use and am still using (except PHP)
Jan 09 2007