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digitalmars.D - Python : Pythonista / Ruby: Rubyist : / D : ?

reply Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
Hi list,

I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. If 
not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

Interested to know, just for fun ...

I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know if 
there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make for an 
interesting thread.

Cheers,
Vasudev
Site: https://vasudevram.github.io
Dlang posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/dlang
Python posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/python
Apr 21
next sibling parent reply ketmar <ketmar ketmar.no-ip.org> writes:
Vasudev Ram wrote:

 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. If not, it 
 means: what are D developers generally called (to indicate that they 
 develop in D)? The question occurred to me somehow while browsing some D 
 posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted terms like 
 this for all languages. For example, I don't know if there is such a term 
 for a C or C++ developer. Might make for an interesting thread.
we are usually called "programmers".
Apr 21
parent Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:29:37 UTC, ketmar wrote:
 Vasudev Ram wrote:

 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know 
 if there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make 
 for an interesting thread.
we are usually called "programmers".
That one was obvious, and same for C, C++ or any other language too. I meant if there was a nickname of some sort, like Pythonista or Rubyist, as said in subject.
Apr 21
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Meta <jared771 gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know if 
 there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make for 
 an interesting thread.

 Cheers,
 Vasudev
 Site: https://vasudevram.github.io
 Dlang posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/dlang
 Python posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/python
I prefer the term Deity.
Apr 21
parent reply Stanislav Blinov <stanislav.blinov gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 18:16:55 UTC, Meta wrote:


 I prefer the term Deity.
Talk about D'lusions of granD're ;)
Apr 21
parent Daniel N <no public.email> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 18:26:30 UTC, Stanislav Blinov wrote:
 On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 18:16:55 UTC, Meta wrote:


 I prefer the term Deity.
Talk about D'lusions of granD're ;)
Disciples
Apr 21
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Moritz Maxeiner <moritz ucworks.org> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know if 
 there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make for 
 an interesting thread.

 Cheers,
 Vasudev
 Site: https://vasudevram.github.io
 Dlang posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/dlang
 Python posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/python
Twixt the denizens of development dwell more than dastards and demons, not just disciples and deliverers: Dreamers!
Apr 21
parent reply Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 19:26:34 UTC, Moritz Maxeiner wrote:
 On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know 
 if there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make 
 for an interesting thread.

 Cheers,
 Vasudev
 Site: https://vasudevram.github.io
 Dlang posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/dlang
 Python posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/python
Twixt the denizens of development dwell more than dastards and demons, not just disciples and deliverers: Dreamers!
Duh. Deity. Disciples. Denizens. Dastards. Demons. Deliverers. Dreamers. Dis thread seems to be doing well, wonder what de devil it will be like in hell. <Walks back to terminal/> De D dev session seems to be doing dandy, danke, D team, cause dat's handy. Ctrl-D
Apr 21
parent evilrat <evilrat666 gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 21:33:59 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 19:26:34 UTC, Moritz Maxeiner wrote:

 Duh.

 Deity. Disciples. Denizens. Dastards. Demons. Deliverers. 
 Dreamers.

 Dis thread seems to be doing well, wonder what de devil it will 
 be like in hell.

 <Walks back to terminal/>

 De D dev session seems to be doing dandy, danke, D team, cause 
 dat's handy.

 Ctrl-D
Sorry guys, just to break up a pattern a bit - D'tards! (no offence)
Apr 21
prev sibling next sibling parent Adrian Matoga <dlang.spam matoga.info> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.
In just 2 weeks we'll get a chance to be called Drunkards.
Apr 21
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Namespace <rswhite4 gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know if 
 there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make for 
 an interesting thread.

 Cheers,
 Vasudev
 Site: https://vasudevram.github.io
 Dlang posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/dlang
 Python posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/python
nuDist - in D you can program as free as you want. ;)
Apr 21
parent Random D user <no email.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 22:11:19 UTC, Namespace wrote:
 nuDist - in D you can program as free as you want. ;)
void main() body { asm { naked; } }
Apr 22
prev sibling next sibling parent ix <adamsibson gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.
Divas.
Apr 21
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Jonathan M Davis via Digitalmars-d <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> writes:
On Friday, April 21, 2017 17:20:14 Vasudev Ram via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. If
 not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know if
 there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make for an
 interesting thread.
I've never heard of anyone doing anything like this in any language. Normally, you'd just say that someone is a D programmer or a C++ programmer or a Java Programmer, etc. But then again, I come from a C++ background, not a scripting language background, and the folks who primarily use scripting languages often tend to look at things differently. - Jonathan M Davis
Apr 21
parent Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 04:20:40 UTC, Jonathan M Davis 
wrote:
 On Friday, April 21, 2017 17:20:14 Vasudev Ram via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know 
 if there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make 
 for an interesting thread.
I've never heard of anyone doing anything like this in any language. Normally, you'd just say that someone is a D programmer or a C++ programmer or a Java Programmer, etc. But then again, I come from a C++ background, not a scripting language background, and the folks who primarily use scripting languages often tend to look at things differently. - Jonathan M Davis
I gave the examples of the terms Pythonista and Rubyist right in the message subject. You personally might not have heard of them or similar ones, as you say. But others have. Those terms are used somewhat widely [1] - "Pythonista" is often by Python programmers to refer to themselves (sometimes Pythoneer is used), and "Rubyist" is often used by Ruby programmers to refer to themselves (individually or collectively, as in, "I'm a Pythonista" (sometimes seen on blogs' About pages or Twitter or LinkedIn bios) or "(us/as) Pythonistas" and other variations of the same. Ditto for Rubyists. Another example I've seen used is Lisper (and Lisp is both a compiled and interpreted language - so it's not like such a term is restricted only to scripting or interpreted languages). [1] Using the word "widely" anecdotally, of course - obviously I've not done a survey on something as trivial as this - it's just that I've been in the field for quite a while, working, interacting with people, reading forums, etc. - and have noticed it used quite often. And I've used Ruby for a few years and Python for many years now, both of them in commercial projects, Python in commercial training that I give, as well as for my own personal projects (mainly Python only). Secondly, using those terms does not mean they are formal designations of any kind. They are just casual terms that someone must have initially made up and that others caught on to and started using, to describe themselves and their community - i.e. Python or Ruby _users_, not all of whom are necessarily users of those languages _alone. Plenty of Python and Ruby developers use other languages too, including compiled / statically typed ones, like C, C++, Java, etc. I am one of them, in fact - I've used both C (and on DOS, Windows and Unix, a lot) and Pascal (Turbo Pascal a lot, Delphi some) earlier, Java some too. (See my other reply upcoming after this one - to Russel Winder). In general, those terms are not meant to be either pejorative or the reverse of pejorative, although some people may of course use the terms disparagingly, self-glorifyingly or whatever.
But then again, I come from a C++ background, not a scripting
 language background, and the folks who primarily use scripting 
 languages often tend to look at things differently.
Yes, if a person comes from only (either) one of those backgrounds - then they are more likely to look at things differently. But there are lots of people who have backgrounds in both (scripting/interpreted and compiled), and some have a lot of background in both, too.
Apr 22
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Russel Winder via Digitalmars-d <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> writes:
On Fri, 2017-04-21 at 17:20 +0000, Vasudev Ram via Digitalmars-d wrote:
 Hi list,
=20
 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. If=C2=A0
 not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to=C2=A0
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me=C2=A0
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.
=20
 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)
=20
 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.
I would hope none of these, but as ketmar said "programmer". Terms such as Pythonista, Rubyist, Rustacean, Gopher, etc. are terms of tribalism and exclusion. They are attempts to ensure people claiming membership of the tribe reject being polyglot by pressuring them to eschew all other languages. A good programmer can work professionally with a number of languages, the psychology of programming people have data supporting this theory =E2= =80=93 if the languages have different computational models. Thus I would claim to be a programmer currently working with D for the project I am working on just now, with SCons/Python for the build system. In a while it will be C++ on another project with CMake. Later still it will be C and Meson on a different project. Further on it will be Kotlin and Frege using Gradle for yet another project. --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Apr 22
next sibling parent reply Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 08:30:03 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Fri, 2017-04-21 at 17:20 +0000, Vasudev Ram via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 Hi list,
 
 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.
 
 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)
 
 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.
I would hope none of these, but as ketmar said "programmer".
See my reply to Jonathan M Davis, above.
 Terms such as Pythonista, Rubyist, Rustacean, Gopher, etc. are 
 terms of tribalism and exclusion. They are attempts to ensure 
 people claiming membership of the tribe reject being polyglot 
 by pressuring them to eschew all other languages.
I think you are over-generalizing, and don't fully agree. Definitely, some people may use those terms in that manner and for that reason. Boo to them :) I'm never in favor of such pressuring, exclusion or whatever. And BTW I know what I am talking about, having seen some of it in real life, one example being in the Ruby world. I did Ruby commercially for a while, learned it even before Rails was created or became popular. And I frequented the Ruby message boards and blogs for a while, and participated in them. Saw a lot of what you describe, others have written about it too. A good amount ofjuvenile and one-up-manship behavior. That is one reason why I moved to Python (apart from liking it after using it some). The community tended to me more mature and engineering-oriented, rather than like the Ruby people, many of whom were hackish and gloated over having done some cool stuff with Ruby "magic" or monkey-patching (which often results in hard-to-find bugs - cool for experimenting, bad for production use). As far as being polyglot is concerned, I'm quite in favor of that too, and would never dream of even suggesting, let alone pressuring, people to "eschew all other languages", as you put it (this is the point about which I don't agree and think you are over-generalizing). In fact, I do training too, and once, a student who was taking a Python course from me, was talking about his goals (he works in another field and is trying to get into development). As part of that, he mentioned wanting "to become a good programmer (Python)" - at which point I immediately replied to him, that his goal should not be to become a good _Python_ programmer, per se, but to become a good _programmer_, period, because there is much more to programming than one or even many languages - databases, use of libraries, software design, testing, debugging, use of source control and other tools, naming conventions, other programming conventions and style, etc. Mentioned books like Code Complete to him - as a great resource on those lines. And I'm a polyglot programmer myself, having worked on BASIC (learnt on home computers), Pascal, C, Java, Informix 4GL. Done real commercial work in all of those, apart from the same in both Ruby and Python. And even keep dabbling in new languages now and then. That's how I came across D, for example, which I like a lot - IIRC it was by reading some article in a computer magazine, could have been Dr. Dobbs.
 A good programmer can work professionally with a number of 
 languages, the psychology of programming people have data 
 supporting this theory – if the languages have different 
 computational models.
Totally agreed.
 Thus I would claim to be a programmer currently working with D 
 for the project I am working on just now, with SCons/Python for 
 the build system. In a while it will be C++ on another project 
 with CMake. Later still it will be C and Meson on a different 
 project. Further on it will be Kotlin and Frege using Gradle 
 for yet another project.
Same here. Language agnostic. It's the best way. Another anecdote - once, in a company where I worked and was managing a product team, I had a need to write a small reminder utility for my own use. The project was in C++ and Java (I worked on the Java side), but since I knew Python and it was a good fit for the tool, I did it in Python - in a few minutes. One of my team members wanted to do it too, so, since he only knew Java, when I told him I was doing it in Python and it would be done very fast, he smiled and said "I'll do it in Java" - and proceeded take more time than I did for the same functionality. Nor was there any performance or other requirement that necessitated Java - he did it because it was the only language he knew. "Use the right tool for the job" and all that ...
Apr 22
parent Joakim <dlang joakim.fea.st> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 17:17:46 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 08:30:03 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Fri, 2017-04-21 at 17:20 +0000, Vasudev Ram via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 Hi list,
 
 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.
 
 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)
 
 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.
I would hope none of these, but as ketmar said "programmer".
There is none, probably just D programmer. Maybe the D community isn't big enough yet.
 Terms such as Pythonista, Rubyist, Rustacean, Gopher, etc. are 
 terms of tribalism and exclusion. They are attempts to ensure 
 people claiming membership of the tribe reject being polyglot 
 by pressuring them to eschew all other languages.
I think you are over-generalizing, and don't fully agree. Definitely, some people may use those terms in that manner and for that reason. Boo to them :)
By definition, you are creating such a term to include some people and exclude others. Often it creates tribes full of groupthink, like Russel says, but it doesn't have to, like you say.
 I'm never in favor of such pressuring, exclusion or whatever. 
 And BTW I know what I am talking about, having seen some of it 
 in real life, one example being in the Ruby world. I did Ruby 
 commercially for a while, learned it even before Rails was 
 created or became popular. And I frequented the Ruby message 
 boards and blogs for a while, and participated in them. Saw a 
 lot of what you describe, others have written about it too. A 
 good amount ofjuvenile and one-up-manship behavior. That is one 
 reason why I moved to Python (apart from liking it after using 
 it some). The community tended to me more mature and 
 engineering-oriented, rather than like the Ruby people, many of 
 whom were hackish and gloated over having done some cool stuff 
 with Ruby "magic" or monkey-patching (which often results in 
 hard-to-find bugs - cool for experimenting, bad for production 
 use). As far as being polyglot is concerned, I'm quite in favor 
 of that too, and would never dream of even suggesting, let 
 alone pressuring, people to "eschew all other languages", as 
 you put it (this is the point about which I don't agree and 
 think you are over-generalizing). In fact, I do training too, 
 and once, a student who was taking a Python course from me, was 
 talking about his goals (he works in another field and is 
 trying to get into development). As part of that, he mentioned 
 wanting "to become a good programmer (Python)" - at which point 
 I immediately replied to him, that his goal should not be to 
 become a good _Python_ programmer, per se, but to become a good 
 _programmer_, period, because there is much more to programming 
 than one or even many languages - databases, use of libraries, 
 software design, testing, debugging, use of source control and 
 other tools, naming conventions, other programming conventions 
 and style, etc.  Mentioned books like Code Complete to him - as 
 a great resource on those lines.

 And I'm a polyglot programmer myself, having worked on BASIC 
 (learnt on home computers), Pascal, C, Java, Informix 4GL. Done 
 real commercial work in all of those, apart from the same in 
 both Ruby and Python. And even keep dabbling in new languages 
 now and then. That's how I came across D, for example, which I 
 like a lot - IIRC it was by reading some article in a computer 
 magazine, could have been Dr. Dobbs.

 A good programmer can work professionally with a number of 
 languages, the psychology of programming people have data 
 supporting this theory – if the languages have different 
 computational models.
Totally agreed.
 Thus I would claim to be a programmer currently working with D 
 for the project I am working on just now, with SCons/Python 
 for the build system. In a while it will be C++ on another 
 project with CMake. Later still it will be C and Meson on a 
 different project. Further on it will be Kotlin and Frege 
 using Gradle for yet another project.
Same here. Language agnostic. It's the best way. Another anecdote - once, in a company where I worked and was managing a product team, I had a need to write a small reminder utility for my own use. The project was in C++ and Java (I worked on the Java side), but since I knew Python and it was a good fit for the tool, I did it in Python - in a few minutes. One of my team members wanted to do it too, so, since he only knew Java, when I told him I was doing it in Python and it would be done very fast, he smiled and said "I'll do it in Java" - and proceeded take more time than I did for the same functionality. Nor was there any performance or other requirement that necessitated Java - he did it because it was the only language he knew. "Use the right tool for the job" and all that ...
You're rambling here. :) We don't have a name for ourselves, it's not a bad question if we should. It's tough to form anything from D alone, another reason the short name sucks for a new language. Of course, C, C# and C++ have the same problem. ;) Maybe we should wait till the community gets larger and see what evolves, if anything.
Apr 24
prev sibling next sibling parent Idan Arye <GenericNPC gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 08:30:03 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 Terms such as Pythonista, Rubyist, Rustacean, Gopher, etc. are 
 terms of tribalism and exclusion. They are attempts to ensure 
 people claiming membership of the tribe reject being polyglot 
 by pressuring them to eschew all other languages.

 A good programmer can work professionally with a number of 
 languages, the psychology of programming people have data 
 supporting this theory – if the languages have different 
 computational models.
Agreed. No need to praise your own group while ridiculing others. These are programming languages, not text editors.
Apr 23
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Guillaume Piolat <first.last gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 08:30:03 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 Terms such as Pythonista, Rubyist, Rustacean, Gopher, etc. are 
 terms of tribalism and exclusion. They are attempts to ensure 
 people claiming membership of the tribe reject being polyglot 
 by pressuring them to eschew all other languages.
+1 When reading such a term I tend to mentally replace it by "beginner" :)
Apr 23
parent "Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa)" <SeeWebsiteToContactMe semitwist.com> writes:
On 04/23/2017 07:55 AM, Guillaume Piolat wrote:
 On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 08:30:03 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 Terms such as Pythonista, Rubyist, Rustacean, Gopher, etc. are terms
 of tribalism and exclusion. They are attempts to ensure people
 claiming membership of the tribe reject being polyglot by pressuring
 them to eschew all other languages.
+1 When reading such a term I tend to mentally replace it by "beginner" :)
I usually read those those terms as "hipster". Similar. :)
Apr 23
prev sibling parent timmyjose <zoltan.jose gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 08:30:03 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 Terms such as Pythonista, Rubyist, Rustacean, Gopher, etc. are 
 terms of tribalism and exclusion. They are attempts to ensure 
 people claiming membership of the tribe reject being polyglot 
 by pressuring them to eschew all other languages.

 A good programmer can work professionally with a number of 
 languages, the psychology of programming people have data 
 supporting this theory – if the languages have different 
 computational models.
Spot on!
Apr 23
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Russel Winder via Digitalmars-d <digitalmars-d puremagic.com> writes:
On Fri, 2017-04-21 at 21:20 -0700, Jonathan M Davis via Digitalmars-d
wrote:
=20
[=E2=80=A6]
 I've never heard of anyone doing anything like this in any language.
 Normally, you'd just say that someone is a D programmer or a C++
 programmer
 or a Java Programmer, etc. But then again, I come from a C++
 background, not
 a scripting language background, and the folks who primarily use
 scripting
 languages often tend to look at things differently.
=20
I guess most people using scripting languages are just Bashing things together. ;-) --=20 Russel. =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D= =3D=3D Dr Russel Winder t: +44 20 7585 2200 voip: sip:russel.winder ekiga.n= et 41 Buckmaster Road m: +44 7770 465 077 xmpp: russel winder.org.uk London SW11 1EN, UK w: www.russel.org.uk skype: russel_winder
Apr 22
parent reply Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 08:33:04 UTC, Russel Winder wrote:
 On Fri, 2017-04-21 at 21:20 -0700, Jonathan M Davis via 
 Digitalmars-d wrote:
 
[…]
 I've never heard of anyone doing anything like this in any 
 language.
 Normally, you'd just say that someone is a D programmer or a 
 C++
 programmer
 or a Java Programmer, etc. But then again, I come from a C++
 background, not
 a scripting language background, and the folks who primarily 
 use
 scripting
 languages often tend to look at things differently.
 
I guess most people using scripting languages are just Bashing things together. ;-)
Awk! What you sed? ;)
just Bashing things together
Nice joke, but not necessarily true in reality. There could be people writing good solid code in scripting languages and the reverse in compiled ones too - in fact I've seen code of some very poor (in quality and knowledge) C developers, who know very little of the ins and outs of the language (pointers and memory management in particular, but other areas too). That's one of the reasons why we have so many buffer overflows and exploits, though of course, I acknowledge, it's not easy to write perfect C code that does not have those issues. I actually worked years ago, for a while, on a legacy banking software product written in C - in maintenance mode - after almost all the original developer team had left the company. Saw some really bad code. Variables like zzy123 were the least of it ... Not a reflection on the language at all, only on those developers.
Apr 22
parent Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
On Saturday, 22 April 2017 at 17:37:13 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:

I actually worked years ago, for a while, on a legacy banking 
software product written in C
In fact, that one was in Microsoft C for DOS 3.0 ... !!! :) I actually also worked some years later on another product in C, which had some similar issues (but turned out quite well in the end, after I got involved with it as the team leader), but that was on Windows, and is another story, maybe will tell it some time later ...
Apr 22
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa)" <SeeWebsiteToContactMe semitwist.com> writes:
On 04/21/2017 01:20 PM, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. If not, it
 means: what are D developers generally called (to indicate that they
 develop in D)?
"Suave, awesome, ultra-attractive programmer with an impeccably fine taste in languages." It's a bit long and doesn't include the letter D, but that just highlights the extreme level of refined, attractive sophistication. (Did I mention attractive?)
Apr 23
parent reply Steven Schveighoffer <schveiguy yahoo.com> writes:
On 4/24/17 1:43 AM, Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa) wrote:

 "Dashing, awesome, ultra-attractive programmer with an impeccably fine
 taste in languages."

 It's a bit long and doesn't include the letter D
FIFY -Steve
Apr 27
parent reply Chris <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Thursday, 27 April 2017 at 12:29:48 UTC, Steven Schveighoffer 
wrote:
 On 4/24/17 1:43 AM, Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa) wrote:

 "Dashing, awesome, ultra-attractive programmer with an 
 impeccably fine
 taste in languages."

 It's a bit long and doesn't include the letter D
FIFY -Steve
D-veloper.
Apr 28
parent Dominikus Dittes Scherkl <Dominikus.Scherkl continental-corporation.com> writes:
On Friday, 28 April 2017 at 13:19:47 UTC, Chris wrote:
 On Thursday, 27 April 2017 at 12:29:48 UTC, Steven 
 Schveighoffer wrote:
 On 4/24/17 1:43 AM, Nick Sabalausky (Abscissa) wrote:

 "Dashing, awesome, ultra-attractive programmer with an 
 impeccably fine
 taste in languages."

 It's a bit long and doesn't include the letter D
FIFY -Steve
D-veloper.
Yeah, I suggested that 4 days ago, but got no responses. So it seems nobody is pleased with this term :-(
Apr 28
prev sibling next sibling parent Dominikus Dittes Scherkl <Dominikus.Scherkl continental-corporation.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)
I would prefer D'veloper.
Apr 24
prev sibling next sibling parent Chris <wendlec tcd.ie> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.
You do know what "langer" means in County Cork, Ireland? ;) [1] [1] https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/langer#Noun
Apr 24
prev sibling next sibling parent Vasudev Ram <vasudevram gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know if 
 there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make for 
 an interesting thread.

 Cheers,
 Vasudev
 Site: https://vasudevram.github.io
 Dlang posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/dlang
 Python posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/python
I was reading some of the replies over the last few days, have replied to a couple of them, and saw some more. Enjoyed reading some of the responses that were in the same fun and innocuous spirit in which I wrote the post. (The D-series of terms, I mean - cool and creative, guys :) Was surprised by some of the other reactions, many of which are probably due to misinterpretation of what I wrote. Will be replying to some more comments, as I think is needed, in a couple of days, but meanwhile, some of those commenters may find something to think about (w.r.t. to claims or "deductions" they have made about (their) perceived meaning of my original post), in this article, an interview of me from over a year ago: https://www.blog.pythonlibrary.org/2015/05/18/pydev-of-the-week-vasudev-ram/ In particular, pay specific attention to my replies to the interviewer about favorite programming languages, and see how well (not!) that correlates with claims or "deductions" that you made here.
Apr 24
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Brad Anderson <eco gnuk.net> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 [snip]

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)
Martian.
Apr 26
parent Martin Tschierschke <mt smartdolphin.de> writes:
On Wednesday, 26 April 2017 at 15:38:16 UTC, Brad Anderson wrote:
 On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 [snip]

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)
Martian.
These seem to be all Dlighted programmers :D
Apr 26
prev sibling next sibling parent Jordan Wilson <wilsonjord gmail.com> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...

 I do realize that there may not be commonly known or accepted 
 terms like this for all languages. For example, I don't know if 
 there is such a term for a C or C++ developer. Might make for 
 an interesting thread.

 Cheers,
 Vasudev
 Site: https://vasudevram.github.io
 Dlang posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/dlang
 Python posts: https://jugad2.blogspot.com/search/label/python
Deviants
Apr 26
prev sibling parent Bienlein <jeti789 web.de> writes:
On Friday, 21 April 2017 at 17:20:14 UTC, Vasudev Ram wrote:
 Hi list,

 I hope the question is self-evident from the message subject. 
 If not, it means: what are D developers generally called (to 
 indicate that they develop in D)? The question occurred to me 
 somehow while browsing some D posts on the forums just now.

 DLanger? DLangist? D'er? Doer? :)

 I tend to favor DLanger, FWIW.

 Interested to know, just for fun ...
Here is one for the fun : Dentists 😂
May 08