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digitalmars.D - Neat: UFCS for integer dot operator suffix

reply "monarch_dodra" <monarchdodra gmail.com> writes:
I tried this, and found it neat that it works:

----
import std.traits;

 property  safe pure nothrow
{
     T Mile(T)(T i)
         if (isNumeric!T)
     {
         return i*1609.44;
     }

     T Ki(T)(T i)
         if (isNumeric!T)
     {
         return i*1024;
     }

     T m(T)(T i)
         if (isNumeric!T)
     {
         return i/1000;
     }
}

void main()
{
     auto medication = 60.m;
     int[32.Ki] buffer;
     auto parisToBerlib = 544.93.Mile;
}

----

It is not homogenous (eg, Km vs Kg vs Kv), but it makes writing 
unit-less sizes pretty easy.

This has probably been discovered before, but it is new to me.

Of course, nothing that can't be done with a simple multiply, but 
I found there is something more... "special"... to doing it with 
dot.
Sep 24 2012
next sibling parent reply "bearophile" <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
monarch_dodra:

 I tried this, and found it neat that it works:

Lately I was thinking about this topic (because of a program that mixes many doubles that are instead different types). // F# let gravityOnEarth = 9.81<m/s^2> let heightOfMyOfficeWindow = 3.5<m> let speedOfImpact = sqrt(2.0 * gravityOnEarth * heightOfMyOfficeWindow) So is this a good syntax for an hypothetical Phobos library? Acceleration gravityOnEarth = Units!"m/s^2"(9.81); alias Units U; auto heightOfMyOfficeWindow = U!`m`(3.5); alias U!"g" grams; // a property auto sugarAmount1 = Grams(10.5); auto sugarAmount2 = 10.5.Grams; Length dist1 = 3.U!"cm"; auto dist2 = 2.U!q{cm^1}; alias U!"cm^2" cm2; assert(dist1 * dist2 == 6.cm2); mixin NewUnit!"degrees"; auto myAngularSpeed = 90.U!"degrees/s"; Bye, bearophile
Sep 24 2012
parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
On 9/24/12 9:36 AM, Philippe Sigaud wrote:
 On Mon, Sep 24, 2012 at 2:28 PM, bearophile<bearophileHUGS lycos.com>  wrote:
 monarch_dodra:


 I tried this, and found it neat that it works:


I used this in a small unit library (partially accessible on github), to obtain code like: auto distance = 100.km; auto speed = 130.km/h; // division works, too. auto timeToDestination = (distance/speed).hour; // distance/speed gives seconds => transformed in hours. It was a nice exercise in using UFCS and mixins to create your own unit library (not only IS, but ay kind of unit library). And, you know what? I *never* used it after coding it. These examples are cute, they make for nice blog posts for F#, but the real-world usage is dubious to me (I know they were space-programs crashes) I quite like the implicit message in units: use the type system to help you catch errors are compile-time. Add to that a nice syntax and a showcase for D's generational capabilities and it's quite nice. But, to my eyes, it's but a toy.

I wouldn't read too much into it. You're a library author, not (I assume) a scientific computing guy. So beyond playing with a few examples, your work on this library is done - you wouldn't be a client of it for the simple reason you don't intensively work with kilometers, speeds, dollars, and such. It's possible that a good and usable library of units could add value to a category of users. Andrei
Sep 24 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent Philippe Sigaud <philippe.sigaud gmail.com> writes:
On Mon, Sep 24, 2012 at 2:28 PM, bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> wrote:
 monarch_dodra:


 I tried this, and found it neat that it works:


I used this in a small unit library (partially accessible on github), to obtain code like: auto distance = 100.km; auto speed = 130.km/h; // division works, too. auto timeToDestination = (distance/speed).hour; // distance/speed gives seconds => transformed in hours. It was a nice exercise in using UFCS and mixins to create your own unit library (not only IS, but ay kind of unit library). And, you know what? I *never* used it after coding it. These examples are cute, they make for nice blog posts for F#, but the real-world usage is dubious to me (I know they were space-programs crashes) I quite like the implicit message in units: use the type system to help you catch errors are compile-time. Add to that a nice syntax and a showcase for D's generational capabilities and it's quite nice. But, to my eyes, it's but a toy.
Sep 24 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "bearophile" <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Philippe Sigaud:

 But, to my eyes, it's but a toy.

There are features (like tuples) that I use all the time in other languages (and in D too), so I know they are useful for me. I have not used units in normal languages (only a little in Frink: http://futureboy.us/frinkdocs/ ), so I don't know for sure they are useful for me :-) On the other hand both in D and other languages I feel the need for strongly typing single values (like typedef in D1). For me telling apart differently typed double values or array types is handy for documentation and improve code readability (and for this a D alias is enough), and the type system enforcement makes me more relaxed while I write code, because I know the compiler catches more mistakes. Bye, bearophile
Sep 24 2012
prev sibling next sibling parent "David Piepgrass" <qwertie256 gmail.com> writes:
 I used this in a small unit library (partially accessible on 
 github),
 to obtain code like:

 auto distance = 100.km;
 auto speed = 130.km/h; // division works, too.

 auto timeToDestination = (distance/speed).hour; // 
 distance/speed
 gives seconds =>  transformed in hours.

 It was a nice exercise in using UFCS and mixins to create your 
 own
 unit library (not only IS, but ay kind of unit library).

 And, you know what? I *never* used it after coding it. These 
 examples
 are cute, they make for nice blog posts for F#, but the 
 real-world
 usage is dubious to me (I know they were space-programs 
 crashes)

 I quite like the implicit message in units: use the type 
 system to
 help you catch errors are compile-time. Add to that a nice 
 syntax and
 a showcase for D's generational capabilities and it's quite 
 nice.

 But, to my eyes, it's but a toy.

I wouldn't read too much into it. You're a library author, not (I assume) a scientific computing guy. So beyond playing with a few examples, your work on this library is done - you wouldn't be a client of it for the simple reason you don't intensively work with kilometers, speeds, dollars, and such. It's possible that a good and usable library of units could add value to a category of users.

IMO, you don't need to be a scientific computing guy to find unit checking useful, since almost any number conceptually has a unit on it. I would ask any programmer, how often do you accidentally use a measurement of 'bytes' where 'dwords' were expected, or use a variable as an array index when it was actually something totally different? However, unit checking cannot be done satisfactorially in a library; it has two main problems when provided that way: 1. It's too bulky (too much syntax required, as units have to be spelled out constantly) 2. Values with traditionally-typed units don't interoperate with existing libraries, including very simple functions such as int abs(int x) { return x > 0 ? x : -x; } int square(int x) { return x*x; } You can define an inplicit conversion from e.g. 'Unit!"pixels"' to 'int' but then you'll need to manually cast it back, and the compiler can't check your cast to make sure it's correct. IMO, solving these two problems requires a parallel type system to infer unit relationships automatically, either with direct language support, or a separate analysis tool that uses the compiler as a service (currently not possible with D).
Sep 24 2012
prev sibling parent "Peter Alexander" <peter.alexander.au gmail.com> writes:
On Monday, 24 September 2012 at 17:47:33 UTC, David Piepgrass 
wrote:
 However, unit checking cannot be done satisfactorially in a 
 library; it has two main problems when provided that way:
 1. It's too bulky (too much syntax required, as units have to 
 be spelled out constantly)
 2. Values with traditionally-typed units don't interoperate 
 with existing libraries, including very simple functions such as

 int abs(int x) { return x > 0 ? x : -x; }
 int square(int x) { return x*x; }

 You can define an inplicit conversion from e.g. 'Unit!"pixels"' 
 to 'int' but then you'll need to manually cast it back, and the 
 compiler can't check your cast to make sure it's correct.

 IMO, solving these two problems requires a parallel type system 
 to infer unit relationships automatically, either with direct 
 language support, or a separate analysis tool that uses the 
 compiler as a service (currently not possible with D).

+1 You can partially solve the function arg/return value problem by making those functions templates but: (a) This doesn't help you with existing functions (e.g. trig function in std.math) (b) It stops those functions from being virtual. (c) Generally makes the functions more difficult to work with (no common type, horrible compilation errors)
Sep 24 2012