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digitalmars.D - Library Development: What to finish/flesh out?

reply dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and weekend
hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of completion.
Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos, though some belong
as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to finish/flesh out all of
them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the community what to prioritize.
Below is a summary of everything I've been working on, with its current level
of completion.  Please let me know the following:

1.  A relative ordering of how useful you think these libraries would be to
the community.

2.  In absolute terms, would you find this useful?

3.  For the Phobos candidates, whether they're general enough to belong in the
**standard** library.

List in order from most to least finished:

1.  Rational:  A library for handling rational numbers exactly.  Templated on
integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or fixed-width integers
for more speed where the denominator and numerator will be small.  Completion
state:  Mostly finished.  Just need to fix a litte bit rot and submit for
review.  (Phobos candidate)

2.  RandAA:  A hash table implementation with deterministic memory management,
based on randomized probing.  Main advantage over builtin AAs is that it plays
much nicer with the GC and multithreaded programs.  Lookup times are also
expected O(1) no matter how many collisions exist in modulus hash space, as
long as there are few collisions in full 32- or 64-bit hash space.  Completion
state:  Mostly finished.  Just needs a little doc improvement, a few
benchmarks and submission for review.  (Phobos candidate)

3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented stack,
useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics code.
Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for this
allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation are that
it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers to
TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented, meaning
you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its main weakness
is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't store the
only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here.  However, in practice
large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in dstats and
Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make it easy
for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state:  Working and
used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

4.  Streaming CSV Parser:  Parses CSV files as they're read in, a few
convenience functions for extracting columns into structs.  If Phobos every
gets SQLite support I'll probably add sugar for turning a CSV file into an
SQLite database, too.  Completion state:  Prototype working, needs testing,
cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

5.  Matrix operations:  SciD improvements that allow you to write matrix
operations that look like normal math/MATLAB and optimizes them via expression
templates so that a minimal number of temporary matrices are created.
Uses/will use BLAS for multiplication.  Completion state:  Addition
implemented.  Multiplication not.

6.  Machine learning:  Decision trees, KNN, Random Forest, Logistic
Regression, SVM, Naive Bayes, etc.  This would be a dstats module.  Completion
state:  Decision trees prototyped, logistic regression working.

7.  std.mixins:  Mixins for commonly needed boilerplate code.  I stopped
working on this when Andrei suggested that making a collection of mixins into
a module is a bad idea.  I've thought about it some more and I respectfully
disagree.  std.mixins would be a one-stop shop for pretty much any boilerplate
you need to inject, and most of this code doesn't fit in any other obvious
place.  Completion state:  A few things (struct comparison, simple class
constructors, Singleton pattern) prototyped.  (Phobos candidate)

8.  GZip support in std.file:  I'll leave the stream stuff for someone else,
but just simple stuff like read(), write(), append() IMHO belongs in std.file.
 Completion state:  Not started, but this is the easiest of the bunch to
implement.  (Phobos candidate)
Mar 17 2011
next sibling parent Tomek =?ISO-8859-2?B?U293afFza2k=?= <just ask.me> writes:
dsimcha napisa=B3:

 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and week=

 hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of completio=

 Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos, though some bel=

 as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to finish/flesh out al=

 them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the community what to prioritiz=

 Below is a summary of everything I've been working on, with its current l=

 of completion.  Please let me know the following:
=20
 1.  A relative ordering of how useful you think these libraries would be =

 the community.
=20
 2.  In absolute terms, would you find this useful?
=20
 3.  For the Phobos candidates, whether they're general enough to belong i=

 **standard** library.
=20
 List in order from most to least finished:
=20
 1.  Rational:  A library for handling rational numbers exactly.  Template=

 integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or fixed-width int=

 for more speed where the denominator and numerator will be small.  Comple=

 state:  Mostly finished.  Just need to fix a litte bit rot and submit for
 review.  (Phobos candidate)

I'd find it useful. As for its presence in Phobos, I'm uncertain if it's in= enough demand.
 2.  RandAA:  A hash table implementation with deterministic memory manage=

 based on randomized probing.  Main advantage over builtin AAs is that it =

 much nicer with the GC and multithreaded programs.  Lookup times are also
 expected O(1) no matter how many collisions exist in modulus hash space, =

 long as there are few collisions in full 32- or 64-bit hash space.  Compl=

 state:  Mostly finished.  Just needs a little doc improvement, a few
 benchmarks and submission for review.  (Phobos candidate)

Useful for me and in Phobos.
 3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented stac=

 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics cod=

 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for this
 allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation are th=

 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers to
 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented, mea=

 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its main weakn=

 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't store=

 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here.  However, in pract=

 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in dstats=

 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make it e=

 for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state:  Working=

 used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

Useful for me, don't know if for everyone else.
 4.  Streaming CSV Parser:  Parses CSV files as they're read in, a few
 convenience functions for extracting columns into structs.  If Phobos eve=

 gets SQLite support I'll probably add sugar for turning a CSV file into an
 SQLite database, too.  Completion state:  Prototype working, needs testin=

 cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

You mean a lazy slurp? It'd be useful for everyone.
 5.  Matrix operations:  SciD improvements that allow you to write matrix
 operations that look like normal math/MATLAB and optimizes them via expre=

 templates so that a minimal number of temporary matrices are created.
 Uses/will use BLAS for multiplication.  Completion state:  Addition
 implemented.  Multiplication not.

It is worth considering standardizing at least matrix expressions in Phobos= . The motivation is analogous to ranges -- to run an algorithm from lib A o= n a matrix container from lib B. C++ would be green with envy. I'd be glad to be part of the effort once I'm done with xml.
 6.  Machine learning:  Decision trees, KNN, Random Forest, Logistic
 Regression, SVM, Naive Bayes, etc.  This would be a dstats module.  Compl=

 state:  Decision trees prototyped, logistic regression working.

I'd find it useful, I think anyone who's into this would too.
 7.  std.mixins:  Mixins for commonly needed boilerplate code.  I stopped
 working on this when Andrei suggested that making a collection of mixins =

 a module is a bad idea.  I've thought about it some more and I respectful=

 disagree.  std.mixins would be a one-stop shop for pretty much any boiler=

 you need to inject, and most of this code doesn't fit in any other obvious
 place.  Completion state:  A few things (struct comparison, simple class
 constructors, Singleton pattern) prototyped.  (Phobos candidate)

I'm afraid I also think functionality should be categorized by the purpose = it serves rather than implementation technique.
 8.  GZip support in std.file:  I'll leave the stream stuff for someone el=

 but just simple stuff like read(), write(), append() IMHO belongs in std.=

  Completion state:  Not started, but this is the easiest of the bunch to
 implement.  (Phobos candidate)

I don't know really... --=20 Tomek
Mar 17 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent "Jason E. Aten" <j.e.aten gmail.com> writes:
On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 15:33:10 +0000, dsimcha wrote:
 5.  Matrix operations:  SciD improvements that allow you to write matrix
 operations that look like normal math/MATLAB and optimizes them via
 expression templates so that a minimal number of temporary matrices are
 created. Uses/will use BLAS for multiplication.  Completion state: 
 Addition implemented.  Multiplication not.

Nice matrix ops get my vote for what I would find most useful. Having matrices with m.rownames and m.colnames (similar to R's rownames(m) and colnames(m) for a matrix m), would be great too.
Mar 17 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply spir <denis.spir gmail.com> writes:
I'd have much use for both below.

On 03/17/2011 04:33 PM, dsimcha wrote:
 1.  Rational:  A library for handling rational numbers exactly.  Templated on
 integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or fixed-width integers
 for more speed where the denominator and numerator will be small.  Completion
 state:  Mostly finished.  Just need to fix a litte bit rot and submit for
 review.  (Phobos candidate)

For decimal exactitude, what about plain fixed point (with decimal factor and binary mantissa)?
 2.  RandAA:  A hash table implementation with deterministic memory management,
 based on randomized probing.  Main advantage over builtin AAs is that it plays
 much nicer with the GC and multithreaded programs.  Lookup times are also
 expected O(1) no matter how many collisions exist in modulus hash space, as
 long as there are few collisions in full 32- or 64-bit hash space.  Completion
 state:  Mostly finished.  Just needs a little doc improvement, a few
 benchmarks and submission for review.  (Phobos candidate)

How complicated would it be to add (optional) support for keeping insertion order (for iteration only)? Thought at a // array with pointers to the cells holding key/value pairs. Denis -- _________________ vita es estrany spir.wikidot.com
Mar 17 2011
next sibling parent dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
On 3/17/2011 6:18 PM, spir wrote:
 I'd have much use for both below.

 On 03/17/2011 04:33 PM, dsimcha wrote:
 1. Rational: A library for handling rational numbers exactly.
 Templated on
 integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or fixed-width
 integers
 for more speed where the denominator and numerator will be small.
 Completion
 state: Mostly finished. Just need to fix a litte bit rot and submit for
 review. (Phobos candidate)

For decimal exactitude, what about plain fixed point (with decimal factor and binary mantissa)?

I wouldn't mind having this, but I see it as completely orthogonal to rational numbers and don't have any near-term intentions of implementing it.
 2. RandAA: A hash table implementation with deterministic memory
 management,
 based on randomized probing. Main advantage over builtin AAs is that
 it plays
 much nicer with the GC and multithreaded programs. Lookup times are also
 expected O(1) no matter how many collisions exist in modulus hash
 space, as
 long as there are few collisions in full 32- or 64-bit hash space.
 Completion
 state: Mostly finished. Just needs a little doc improvement, a few
 benchmarks and submission for review. (Phobos candidate)

How complicated would it be to add (optional) support for keeping insertion order (for iteration only)? Thought at a // array with pointers to the cells holding key/value pairs.

It's a good idea, but IMHO something like this should be templated on the type of the associative array and work with builtin AAs, etc., too. It should be a decorator or something: /** Wraps any type that conforms to the duck interface of an associative array to preserve ordering for iteration. */ struct OrderedAA(AA) { alias typeof(AA.init.keys.front) K; alias typeof(AA.init.values.front) V; K[] order; AA aa; void opIndexAssign(V val, K key) { if(!(key in aa)) { order ~= key; } aa[key] = val; } // opApply, etc. }
Mar 17 2011
prev sibling parent spir <denis.spir gmail.com> writes:
On 03/17/2011 11:25 PM, dsimcha wrote:
 On 3/17/2011 6:18 PM, spir wrote:
 I'd have much use for both below.

 On 03/17/2011 04:33 PM, dsimcha wrote:
 1. Rational: A library for handling rational numbers exactly.
 Templated on
 integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or fixed-width
 integers
 for more speed where the denominator and numerator will be small.
 Completion
 state: Mostly finished. Just need to fix a litte bit rot and submit for
 review. (Phobos candidate)

For decimal exactitude, what about plain fixed point (with decimal factor and binary mantissa)?

I wouldn't mind having this, but I see it as completely orthogonal to rational numbers and don't have any near-term intentions of implementing it.

Right.
 2. RandAA: A hash table implementation with deterministic memory
 management,
 based on randomized probing. Main advantage over builtin AAs is that
 it plays
 much nicer with the GC and multithreaded programs. Lookup times are also
 expected O(1) no matter how many collisions exist in modulus hash
 space, as
 long as there are few collisions in full 32- or 64-bit hash space.
 Completion
 state: Mostly finished. Just needs a little doc improvement, a few
 benchmarks and submission for review. (Phobos candidate)

How complicated would it be to add (optional) support for keeping insertion order (for iteration only)? Thought at a // array with pointers to the cells holding key/value pairs.

It's a good idea, but IMHO something like this should be templated on the type of the associative array and work with builtin AAs, etc., too. It should be a decorator or something: /** Wraps any type that conforms to the duck interface of an associative array to preserve ordering for iteration. */ struct OrderedAA(AA) { alias typeof(AA.init.keys.front) K; alias typeof(AA.init.values.front) V; K[] order; AA aa; void opIndexAssign(V val, K key) { if(!(key in aa)) { order ~= key; } aa[key] = val; } // opApply, etc. }

Right too. But the reason I have not implemented it yet is I don't want to keep a // array of keys, which require AA lookup for each key. Instead, I thought at an array of pointers to where the (key:value) cells are stored (cell "buckets"), to avoid AA key lookups. This, I guess, requires tweaking the implementation of the actual data structure. Reason why I asked you as you are dfevelopping a new one (so, you may have such a use case in mind before design is frozen). I have not yet had a look at the implementation of builtin AAs to see whether this would be easy. I guess not: it just require catching the very moment where a new pair is placed into a given bucket corresponding to its hash value. (And possibly the same thing at re-hash time.) Denis -- _________________ vita es estrany spir.wikidot.com
Mar 18 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 3/17/2011 8:33 AM, dsimcha wrote:
 8.  GZip support in std.file:  I'll leave the stream stuff for someone else,
 but just simple stuff like read(), write(), append() IMHO belongs in std.file.
   Completion state:  Not started, but this is the easiest of the bunch to
 implement.  (Phobos candidate)

I'd definitely like to see gzip support in Phobos. But it shouldn't be in std.file, as there are many compression schemes in use besides gzip, and such should be composable with the file interface using ranges. In fact, gzip has nothing necessarily to do with files. It compresses/decompresses a stream (a range in D). Whether that is a file or something else is quite irrelevant to gzip. DMD, for example, uses a simple compressor for long symbol names. I suggest making a package for compressors, and then have gzip be a module within that, as in: std.compressor.gzip
Mar 17 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Don <nospam nospam.com> writes:
dsimcha wrote:
 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and weekend
 hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of completion.
 Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos, though some belong
 as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to finish/flesh out all of
 them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the community what to prioritize.
 Below is a summary of everything I've been working on, with its current level
 of completion.  Please let me know the following:

 3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented stack,
 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics code.
 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for this
 allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation are that
 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers to
 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented, meaning
 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its main weakness
 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't store the
 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here.  However, in practice
 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in dstats and
 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make it easy
 for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state:  Working and
 used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

This is #1. Far and away. Belongs in druntime. I would use it instantly in BigInt.
Mar 17 2011
next sibling parent reply Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
On Mar 17, 2011, at 11:56 PM, Don wrote:

 dsimcha wrote:
 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and =


 hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of =


 Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos, though some =


 as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to finish/flesh =


 them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the community what to =


 Below is a summary of everything I've been working on, with its =


 of completion.  Please let me know the following:

 3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented =


 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics =


 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for =


 allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation =


 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers =


 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented, =


 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its main =


 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't =


 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here.  However, in =


 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in =


 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make =


 for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state:  =


 used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

This is #1. Far and away. Belongs in druntime.

Stuff like this is why core.memory isn't called core.gc.=
Mar 24 2011
next sibling parent dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
== Quote from Sean Kelly (sean invisibleduck.org)'s article
 On Mar 17, 2011, at 11:56 PM, Don wrote:
 dsimcha wrote:
 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and


 hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of


 Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos, though some


 as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to finish/flesh


 them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the community what to


 Below is a summary of everything I've been working on, with its


 of completion.  Please let me know the following:

 3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented


 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics


 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for


 allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation


 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers


 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented,


 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its main


 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't


 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here.  However, in


 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in


 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make


 for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state:


 used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

This is #1. Far and away. Belongs in druntime.


Ok, this seems like a popular choice. I should have time after my )#*#$ thesis proposal and after std.parallelism is done to clean this up and submit for review. I'm sure the documentation will need to be improved, but as with std.parallelism I'm not sure **how** it will be judged deficient by people not as intimately familiar with the library as I am.
Mar 24 2011
prev sibling parent reply dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
== Quote from Sean Kelly (sean invisibleduck.org)'s article
 On Mar 17, 2011, at 11:56 PM, Don wrote:
 dsimcha wrote:
 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and


 hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of


 Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos, though some


 as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to finish/flesh


 them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the community what to


 Below is a summary of everything I've been working on, with its


 of completion.  Please let me know the following:

 3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented


 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics


 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for


 allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation


 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers


 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented,


 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its main


 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't


 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here.  However, in


 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in


 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make


 for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state:


 used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

This is #1. Far and away. Belongs in druntime.


BTW, the TempAlloc module also includes a hash table, hash set and AVL tree that are specifically optimized for TempAlloc. Should these be included in the submission? The disadvantages I see here is that they are less generally useful (possibly too high level for druntime) and that they will make the review take a heck of a lot longer.
Mar 24 2011
parent reply dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
On 3/25/2011 3:50 PM, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Mar 24, 2011, at 1:00 PM, dsimcha wrote:
 BTW, the TempAlloc module also includes a hash table, hash set and AVL tree
that
 are specifically optimized for TempAlloc.  Should these be included in the
 submission?  The disadvantages I see here is that they are less generally
useful
 (possibly too high level for druntime) and that they will make the review take
a
 heck of a lot longer.

Are they necessary for TempAlloc to function? If so, I'd add them but hidden, as I imagine there's more code than you'd want to simply drop in a private block in core.memory. It may be time for core to get a core.internal package for this kind of stuff.

No, they are just data structures built on top of TempAlloc and optimized for it.
Mar 25 2011
parent dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
On 3/25/2011 5:59 PM, Denis Koroskin wrote:
 On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 00:26:40 +0300, dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> wrote:

 On 3/25/2011 3:50 PM, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Mar 24, 2011, at 1:00 PM, dsimcha wrote:
 BTW, the TempAlloc module also includes a hash table, hash set and
 AVL tree that
 are specifically optimized for TempAlloc. Should these be included
 in the
 submission? The disadvantages I see here is that they are less
 generally useful
 (possibly too high level for druntime) and that they will make the
 review take a
 heck of a lot longer.

Are they necessary for TempAlloc to function? If so, I'd add them but hidden, as I imagine there's more code than you'd want to simply drop in a private block in core.memory. It may be time for core to get a core.internal package for this kind of stuff.

No, they are just data structures built on top of TempAlloc and optimized for it.

I'd love to see them, in a separate module probably.

This suggests two separate proposals. The more I think about it, the more I think this is the way to go. TempAlloc per se is much more self-evidently useful than the extra data structures and doesn't need the extra data structures to work. The extras shouldn't hold up its inclusion. The extra data structures only use (or only should use; I don't remember whether I bend this rule) TempAlloc's public API. Furthermore, I'm not sure they're generally useful enough to belong in Phobos. I'd like feedback from others when/if TempAlloc is in Phobos and more people are familiar with it.
Mar 25 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
On Mar 24, 2011, at 1:00 PM, dsimcha wrote:
=20
 BTW, the TempAlloc module also includes a hash table, hash set and AVL =

 are specifically optimized for TempAlloc.  Should these be included in =

 submission?  The disadvantages I see here is that they are less =

 (possibly too high level for druntime) and that they will make the =

 heck of a lot longer.

Are they necessary for TempAlloc to function? If so, I'd add them but = hidden, as I imagine there's more code than you'd want to simply drop in = a private block in core.memory. It may be time for core to get a = core.internal package for this kind of stuff.=
Mar 25 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent "Denis Koroskin" <2korden gmail.com> writes:
On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 00:26:40 +0300, dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> wrote:

 On 3/25/2011 3:50 PM, Sean Kelly wrote:
 On Mar 24, 2011, at 1:00 PM, dsimcha wrote:
 BTW, the TempAlloc module also includes a hash table, hash set and AVL  
 tree that
 are specifically optimized for TempAlloc.  Should these be included in  
 the
 submission?  The disadvantages I see here is that they are less  
 generally useful
 (possibly too high level for druntime) and that they will make the  
 review take a
 heck of a lot longer.

Are they necessary for TempAlloc to function? If so, I'd add them but hidden, as I imagine there's more code than you'd want to simply drop in a private block in core.memory. It may be time for core to get a core.internal package for this kind of stuff.

No, they are just data structures built on top of TempAlloc and optimized for it.

I'd love to see them, in a separate module probably.
Mar 25 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
On 3/18/2011 2:56 AM, Don wrote:
 3. TempAlloc: A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented stack,
 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics
 code.
 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for this
 allocation scheme. The advantages over plain old stack allocation are
 that
 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers to
 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented,
 meaning
 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow. Its main
 weakness
 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't
 store the
 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here. However, in
 practice
 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code. I find this module immensely useful in
 dstats and
 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD. Getting it into Phobos would make it
 easy
 for other scientific/numerics code to use it. Completion state:
 Working and
 used. Needs a litte cleanup and documentation. (Phobos candidate)

This is #1. Far and away. Belongs in druntime. I would use it instantly in BigInt.

This is not up for "official" review yet because std.net.isemail and std.parallelism (and possibly more stuff depending on how we manage the review queue) are ahead of it. If you want a sneak preview: Code: https://github.com/dsimcha/TempAlloc Docs: http://cis.jhu.edu/~dsimcha/d/phobos/core_tempalloc.html I put in a few small, tangentially related memory allocation functions that I've wanted in druntime/Phobos for awhile in this proposal, too. alignedMalloc() and alignedFree() are used by TempAlloc but can be made private if people don't like them. newVoid() is not used by TempAlloc and might fit better in std.array, but I think it belongs somewhere in Phobos or druntime.
Mar 26 2011
parent dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
On 3/28/2011 7:38 PM, Masahiro Nakagawa wrote:
 On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 12:09:03 +0900, dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> wrote:
 
 On 3/18/2011 2:56 AM, Don wrote:
 3. TempAlloc: A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented 
 stack,
 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics
 code.
 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for this
 allocation scheme. The advantages over plain old stack allocation are
 that
 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers to
 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented,
 meaning
 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow. Its main
 weakness
 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't
 store the
 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here. However, in
 practice
 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code. I find this module immensely useful in
 dstats and
 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD. Getting it into Phobos would make it
 easy
 for other scientific/numerics code to use it. Completion state:
 Working and
 used. Needs a litte cleanup and documentation. (Phobos candidate)

This is #1. Far and away. Belongs in druntime. I would use it instantly in BigInt.

This is not up for "official" review yet because std.net.isemail and std.parallelism (and possibly more stuff depending on how we manage the review queue) are ahead of it. If you want a sneak preview: Code: https://github.com/dsimcha/TempAlloc Docs: http://cis.jhu.edu/~dsimcha/d/phobos/core_tempalloc.html I put in a few small, tangentially related memory allocation functions that I've wanted in druntime/Phobos for awhile in this proposal, too. alignedMalloc() and alignedFree() are used by TempAlloc but can be made private if people don't like them. newVoid() is not used by TempAlloc and might fit better in std.array, but I think it belongs somewhere in Phobos or druntime.

Now, I am thinking of light-weight process for concurrency. Your TempAlloc(segmented stack) seems to be a good parts for implementing such feature :) Masahiro

I'm not sure what you're suggesting. I'd definitely need more details to help you in any way. If it involves fibers, remember that thread-local storage only works with OS threads. TempAlloc stores its state in thread-local storage. Other than that, I'm interested in hearing about this. If there are any enhancements I can add to make what you want to do easier, let me know.
Mar 28 2011
prev sibling parent "Masahiro Nakagawa" <repeatedly gmail.com> writes:
On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 12:09:03 +0900, dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> wrote:

 On 3/18/2011 2:56 AM, Don wrote:
 3. TempAlloc: A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented  
 stack,
 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics
 code.
 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for this
 allocation scheme. The advantages over plain old stack allocation are
 that
 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers to
 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented,
 meaning
 you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow. Its main
 weakness
 is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that you can't
 store the
 only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here. However, in
 practice
 large arrays of primitives are an extremely common case in
 performance-critical code. I find this module immensely useful in
 dstats and
 Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD. Getting it into Phobos would make it
 easy
 for other scientific/numerics code to use it. Completion state:
 Working and
 used. Needs a litte cleanup and documentation. (Phobos candidate)

This is #1. Far and away. Belongs in druntime. I would use it instantly in BigInt.

This is not up for "official" review yet because std.net.isemail and std.parallelism (and possibly more stuff depending on how we manage the review queue) are ahead of it. If you want a sneak preview: Code: https://github.com/dsimcha/TempAlloc Docs: http://cis.jhu.edu/~dsimcha/d/phobos/core_tempalloc.html I put in a few small, tangentially related memory allocation functions that I've wanted in druntime/Phobos for awhile in this proposal, too. alignedMalloc() and alignedFree() are used by TempAlloc but can be made private if people don't like them. newVoid() is not used by TempAlloc and might fit better in std.array, but I think it belongs somewhere in Phobos or druntime.

Now, I am thinking of light-weight process for concurrency. Your TempAlloc(segmented stack) seems to be a good parts for implementing such feature :) Masahiro
Mar 28 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Lars T. Kyllingstad" <public kyllingen.NOSPAMnet> writes:
On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 15:33:10 +0000, dsimcha wrote:

 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and
 weekend hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of
 completion. Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos,
 though some belong as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to
 finish/flesh out all of them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the
 community what to prioritize. Below is a summary of everything I've been
 working on, with its current level of completion.  Please let me know
 the following:
 
 1.  A relative ordering of how useful you think these libraries would be
 to the community.

In order: 1. TempAlloc 2. Matrix ops (I'm biased here, of course...) 3. RandAA 4. CSV parser 5. Rational That said, it does make sense to start with the things which require the least amount of work. If it would take you half an hour to complete the rationals lib, for instance, that may be a good starting point. Regarding std.mixins, I have to agree with Andrei and the others that code should be organised by functionality and not implementation method. Having thought some more about it, I also think std.file is not the right place for GZip support. Phobos needs an std.compression package/module, and a method for bulk reading/writing of gzip files may well be a good start. Finally, I know next to nothing about machine learning, so I won't express any opinion about it.
 2.  In absolute terms, would you find this useful?

Absolutely!
 3.  For the Phobos candidates, whether they're general enough to belong
 in the **standard** library.

I agree with Don that TempAlloc is a candidate for druntime. Other than that, yes. I note that others have suggested that the matrix stuff go into Phobos. As long as it depends on BLAS, I would say that's out of the question. -Lars
Mar 18 2011
next sibling parent filgood <filgood somewhere.net> writes:
Hi Lars,

I agree on your order....but would like to see Matrix ops in Phobos over 
time (my understanding was that it can work without BLAS (just slower), 
people can always in BLAS when they need to extra performance, no?).

David, thanks a lot for your hard work...



On 18/03/2011 09:26, Lars T. Kyllingstad wrote:
 On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 15:33:10 +0000, dsimcha wrote:

 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and
 weekend hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of
 completion. Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos,
 though some belong as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to
 finish/flesh out all of them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the
 community what to prioritize. Below is a summary of everything I've been
 working on, with its current level of completion.  Please let me know
 the following:

 1.  A relative ordering of how useful you think these libraries would be
 to the community.

In order: 1. TempAlloc 2. Matrix ops (I'm biased here, of course...) 3. RandAA 4. CSV parser 5. Rational That said, it does make sense to start with the things which require the least amount of work. If it would take you half an hour to complete the rationals lib, for instance, that may be a good starting point. Regarding std.mixins, I have to agree with Andrei and the others that code should be organised by functionality and not implementation method. Having thought some more about it, I also think std.file is not the right place for GZip support. Phobos needs an std.compression package/module, and a method for bulk reading/writing of gzip files may well be a good start. Finally, I know next to nothing about machine learning, so I won't express any opinion about it.
 2.  In absolute terms, would you find this useful?

Absolutely!
 3.  For the Phobos candidates, whether they're general enough to belong
 in the **standard** library.

I agree with Don that TempAlloc is a candidate for druntime. Other than that, yes. I note that others have suggested that the matrix stuff go into Phobos. As long as it depends on BLAS, I would say that's out of the question. -Lars

Mar 18 2011
prev sibling parent Caligo <iteronvexor gmail.com> writes:
--20cf307d02cad651d3049ecdbc97
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

On Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 2:19 PM, filgood <filgood somewhere.net> wrote:

 Hi Lars,

 I agree on your order....but would like to see Matrix ops in Phobos over
 time (my understanding was that it can work without BLAS (just slower),
 people can always in BLAS when they need to extra performance, no?).

 David, thanks a lot for your hard work...

How about Eigen? http://eigen.tuxfamily.org/index.php?title=Benchmark Those benchmarks are old, but still. Eigen v3 performs even better and they've added multi-threading and tons of other features and enhancements. --20cf307d02cad651d3049ecdbc97 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable <br><br><div class=3D"gmail_quote">On Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 2:19 PM, filgood= <span dir=3D"ltr">&lt;<a href=3D"mailto:filgood somewhere.net">filgood som= ewhere.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class=3D"gmail_quote" style= =3D"margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); p= adding-left: 1ex;"> Hi Lars,<br> <br> I agree on your order....but would like to see Matrix ops in Phobos over ti= me (my understanding was that it can work without BLAS (just slower), peopl= e can always in BLAS when they need to extra performance, no?).<br> <br> David, thanks a lot for your hard work...<div><div></div><div class=3D"h5">= <br> <br></div></div></blockquote></div><br><br>How about Eigen?=A0 <br><br><a h= ref=3D"http://eigen.tuxfamily.org/index.php?title=3DBenchmark">http://eigen= .tuxfamily.org/index.php?title=3DBenchmark</a><br><br>Those benchmarks are = old, but still.=A0 Eigen v3 performs even better and they&#39;ve added mult= i-threading and tons of other features and enhancements.<br> --20cf307d02cad651d3049ecdbc97--
Mar 18 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Jonathan M Davis <jmdavisProg gmx.com> writes:
On 2011-03-17 08:33, dsimcha wrote:
 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and
 weekend hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of
 completion. Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos,
 though some belong as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to
 finish/flesh out all of them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the
 community what to prioritize. Below is a summary of everything I've been
 working on, with its current level of completion.  Please let me know the
 following:
 
 1.  A relative ordering of how useful you think these libraries would be to
 the community.
 
 2.  In absolute terms, would you find this useful?
 
 3.  For the Phobos candidates, whether they're general enough to belong in
 the **standard** library.

I find the responses to this list to be rather interesting. Most of it, I find to be of mild interest at best (certainly for the sort of stuff that _I_ do anyway), but others find some of them to be very desirable.
 List in order from most to least finished:
 
 1.  Rational:  A library for handling rational numbers exactly.  Templated
 on integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or fixed-width
 integers for more speed where the denominator and numerator will be small.
  Completion state:  Mostly finished.  Just need to fix a litte bit rot and
 submit for review.  (Phobos candidate)

Potentially interesting, but I don't know if I'd ever use it.
 2.  RandAA:  A hash table implementation with deterministic memory
 management, based on randomized probing.  Main advantage over builtin AAs
 is that it plays much nicer with the GC and multithreaded programs. 
 Lookup times are also expected O(1) no matter how many collisions exist in
 modulus hash space, as long as there are few collisions in full 32- or
 64-bit hash space.  Completion state:  Mostly finished.  Just needs a
 little doc improvement, a few benchmarks and submission for review. 
 (Phobos candidate)

I'm afraid that I don't understand how this is better than the current hash table, and if it really is better, perhaps it should replace implementation of the built in one?
 3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented stack,
 useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like numerics code.
 Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree optimized for this
 allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation are that
 it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers to
 TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented,
 meaning you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its
 main weakness is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that
 you can't store the only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory here.
  However, in practice large arrays of primitives are an extremely common
 case in
 performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in dstats
 and Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make
 it easy for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state: 
 Working and used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos
 candidate)

Personally, I see zero use for this in my stuff, but obviously others find it very compelling.
 4.  Streaming CSV Parser:  Parses CSV files as they're read in, a few
 convenience functions for extracting columns into structs.  If Phobos every
 gets SQLite support I'll probably add sugar for turning a CSV file into an
 SQLite database, too.  Completion state:  Prototype working, needs testing,
 cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

This definitely sounds useful. I've had to deal with CSV parsing in Java before, and I'd love to see a solid CSV parser in Phobos, but I don't know how much I'd actually end up using it. In the few cases where I'd be looking to deal with CSV files though, it could be invaluable.
 5.  Matrix operations:  SciD improvements that allow you to write matrix
 operations that look like normal math/MATLAB and optimizes them via
 expression templates so that a minimal number of temporary matrices are
 created. Uses/will use BLAS for multiplication.  Completion state: 
 Addition implemented.  Multiplication not.

I don't expect that I'd _ever_ need this, but I'd fully expect that some folks would love it.
 6.  Machine learning:  Decision trees, KNN, Random Forest, Logistic
 Regression, SVM, Naive Bayes, etc.  This would be a dstats module. 
 Completion state:  Decision trees prototyped, logistic regression working.

I'd have to see the actual library to know whether I'd find much use in it. Probably not though.
 7.  std.mixins:  Mixins for commonly needed boilerplate code.  I stopped
 working on this when Andrei suggested that making a collection of mixins
 into a module is a bad idea.  I've thought about it some more and I
 respectfully disagree.  std.mixins would be a one-stop shop for pretty
 much any boilerplate you need to inject, and most of this code doesn't fit
 in any other obvious place.  Completion state:  A few things (struct
 comparison, simple class constructors, Singleton pattern) prototyped. 
 (Phobos candidate)

This, I very much like. I'd _love_ to have standard mixins for stuff like opEquals and opCmp. I can kind of understand why Andrei might not like a module that's just mixins, but this just seems so useful that I think that it's a definite loss that we _don't_ have it right now. D has done a lot for reducing boiler plate code (the new overloaded operators in particular are quite good at that), but there's still plenty of stuff which is pretty boilerplate and could use solid, standard string mixins to solve it.
 8.  GZip support in std.file:  I'll leave the stream stuff for someone
 else, but just simple stuff like read(), write(), append() IMHO belongs in
 std.file. Completion state:  Not started, but this is the easiest of the
 bunch to implement.  (Phobos candidate)

I don't know about this. std.stream should be able to handle gzip files, but I'm not quite sure what you'd do with std.file to support gzip. It would have to be done in a way that would work with other file types generically (decorator pattern kind of solution). This very much feels to me like the kind of thing that you'd want to do with streams rather than std.file or std.stdio. If all you want to do is compress and uncompress a file, then perhaps we should have some set of modules for dealing with different types of compression (we already have std.zip). I don't see what std.file would be doing though. So, overall, the stuff that you have is mostly not stuff that I'd find useful at all, but I can see how someone else might (obviously you did). For the most part, I wouldn't have a problem with this sort of stuff being in Phobos. It's just not something that I'd be using, personally. - Jonathan M Davis
Mar 25 2011
parent reply Johan Granberg <lijat.meREM OVEgmail.com> writes:
Jonathan M Davis wrote:

 On 2011-03-17 08:33, dsimcha wrote:
 I've accumulated a bunch of little libraries via various evening and
 weekend hacking projects over the past year or so, in various states of
 completion. Most are things I'm at least half-considering for Phobos,
 though some belong as third-party libs.  I definitely don't have time to
 finish/flesh out all of them anytime soon, so I've decided to ask the
 community what to prioritize. Below is a summary of everything I've been
 working on, with its current level of completion.  Please let me know the
 following:
 
 1.  A relative ordering of how useful you think these libraries would be
 to the community.
 
 2.  In absolute terms, would you find this useful?
 
 3.  For the Phobos candidates, whether they're general enough to belong
 in the **standard** library.

I find the responses to this list to be rather interesting. Most of it, I find to be of mild interest at best (certainly for the sort of stuff that _I_ do anyway), but others find some of them to be very desirable.
 List in order from most to least finished:
 
 1.  Rational:  A library for handling rational numbers exactly. 
 Templated on integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or
 fixed-width integers for more speed where the denominator and numerator
 will be small.
  Completion state:  Mostly finished.  Just need to fix a litte bit rot
  and
 submit for review.  (Phobos candidate)

Potentially interesting, but I don't know if I'd ever use it.
 2.  RandAA:  A hash table implementation with deterministic memory
 management, based on randomized probing.  Main advantage over builtin AAs
 is that it plays much nicer with the GC and multithreaded programs.
 Lookup times are also expected O(1) no matter how many collisions exist
 in modulus hash space, as long as there are few collisions in full 32- or
 64-bit hash space.  Completion state:  Mostly finished.  Just needs a
 little doc improvement, a few benchmarks and submission for review.
 (Phobos candidate)

I'm afraid that I don't understand how this is better than the current hash table, and if it really is better, perhaps it should replace implementation of the built in one?
 3.  TempAlloc:  A memory allocator based on a thread-local segmented
 stack, useful for allocating large temporary buffers in things like
 numerics code. Also comes with a hash table, hash set and AVL tree
 optimized for this
 allocation scheme.  The advantages over plain old stack allocation are
 that it's independent of function calls (meaning you can return pointers
 to TempAlloc-allocated memory from a function, etc.) and it's segmented,
 meaning you can allocate huge buffers w/o risking stack overflow.  Its
 main weakness is that this stack is not scanned by the GC, meaning that
 you can't store the only reference to a GC-allocated piece of memory
 here.
  However, in practice large arrays of primitives are an extremely common
 case in
 performance-critical code.  I find this module immensely useful in dstats
 and Lars Kyllingstad uses it in SciD.  Getting it into Phobos would make
 it easy for other scientific/numerics code to use it.  Completion state:
 Working and used.  Needs a litte cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos
 candidate)

Personally, I see zero use for this in my stuff, but obviously others find it very compelling.
 4.  Streaming CSV Parser:  Parses CSV files as they're read in, a few
 convenience functions for extracting columns into structs.  If Phobos
 every gets SQLite support I'll probably add sugar for turning a CSV file
 into an
 SQLite database, too.  Completion state:  Prototype working, needs
 testing,
 cleanup and documentation.  (Phobos candidate)

This definitely sounds useful. I've had to deal with CSV parsing in Java before, and I'd love to see a solid CSV parser in Phobos, but I don't know how much I'd actually end up using it. In the few cases where I'd be looking to deal with CSV files though, it could be invaluable.
 5.  Matrix operations:  SciD improvements that allow you to write matrix
 operations that look like normal math/MATLAB and optimizes them via
 expression templates so that a minimal number of temporary matrices are
 created. Uses/will use BLAS for multiplication.  Completion state:
 Addition implemented.  Multiplication not.

I don't expect that I'd _ever_ need this, but I'd fully expect that some folks would love it.

Definitely some would love it, me among them. This to me feels like the most useful. Does your (dsimcha) implementation support spare matrices as well, and if not are the api general engough to support them if someone has time to implement them. When you say looks like normal matlab does that include b=A\x? Regardless any standardization of linear algebra libraries would improve on the current state in most languages.
 6.  Machine learning:  Decision trees, KNN, Random Forest, Logistic
 Regression, SVM, Naive Bayes, etc.  This would be a dstats module.
 Completion state:  Decision trees prototyped, logistic regression
 working.

I'd have to see the actual library to know whether I'd find much use in it. Probably not though.
 7.  std.mixins:  Mixins for commonly needed boilerplate code.  I stopped
 working on this when Andrei suggested that making a collection of mixins
 into a module is a bad idea.  I've thought about it some more and I
 respectfully disagree.  std.mixins would be a one-stop shop for pretty
 much any boilerplate you need to inject, and most of this code doesn't
 fit
 in any other obvious place.  Completion state:  A few things (struct
 comparison, simple class constructors, Singleton pattern) prototyped.
 (Phobos candidate)

This, I very much like. I'd _love_ to have standard mixins for stuff like opEquals and opCmp. I can kind of understand why Andrei might not like a module that's just mixins, but this just seems so useful that I think that it's a definite loss that we _don't_ have it right now. D has done a lot for reducing boiler plate code (the new overloaded operators in particular are quite good at that), but there's still plenty of stuff which is pretty boilerplate and could use solid, standard string mixins to solve it.
 8.  GZip support in std.file:  I'll leave the stream stuff for someone
 else, but just simple stuff like read(), write(), append() IMHO belongs
 in
 std.file. Completion state:  Not started, but this is the easiest of the
 bunch to implement.  (Phobos candidate)

I don't know about this. std.stream should be able to handle gzip files, but I'm not quite sure what you'd do with std.file to support gzip. It would have to be done in a way that would work with other file types generically (decorator pattern kind of solution). This very much feels to me like the kind of thing that you'd want to do with streams rather than std.file or std.stdio. If all you want to do is compress and uncompress a file, then perhaps we should have some set of modules for dealing with different types of compression (we already have std.zip). I don't see what std.file would be doing though. So, overall, the stuff that you have is mostly not stuff that I'd find useful at all, but I can see how someone else might (obviously you did). For the most part, I wouldn't have a problem with this sort of stuff being in Phobos. It's just not something that I'd be using, personally. - Jonathan M Davis

Mar 26 2011
parent dsimcha <dsimcha yahoo.com> writes:
On 3/26/2011 4:25 AM, Johan Granberg wrote:
 Definitely some would love it, me among them. This to me feels like the most
 useful. Does your (dsimcha) implementation support spare matrices as well,
 and if not are the api general engough to support them if someone has time
 to implement them. When you say looks like normal matlab does that include
 b=A\x? Regardless any standardization of linear algebra libraries would
 improve on the current state in most languages.

No support for sparse matrices, but the API should have no problem supporting them eventually. It's all templates. I'd like to support b=A\x, but D doesn't have a \ operator. At any rate, it's not much more verbose to do b = solve(A, x).
Mar 26 2011
prev sibling parent spir <denis.spir gmail.com> writes:
On 03/26/2011 04:43 AM, Jonathan M Davis wrote:
 I find the responses to this list to be rather interesting. Most of it, I find
 to be of mild interest at best (certainly for the sort of stuff that _I_ do
 anyway), but others find some of them to be very desirable.

  List in order from most to least finished:

  1.  Rational:  A library for handling rational numbers exactly.  Templated
  on integer type, can use BigInts for guaranteed accuracy, or fixed-width
  integers for more speed where the denominator and numerator will be small.
    Completion state:  Mostly finished.  Just need to fix a litte bit rot and
  submit for review.  (Phobos candidate)



That's it: never ever listen to people to know what they /really/ need, really find useful, really appreciate. Many are able to push like crazy for thingies that just look cool (esp at design time), but none of them will actually use for three years. (experienced ;-) Denis -- _________________ vita es estrany spir.wikidot.com
Mar 26 2011