www.digitalmars.com         C & C++   DMDScript  

digitalmars.D - Google Chrome and process-based design

reply "Denis Koroskin" <2korden gmail.com> writes:
You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome  
browser.
Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,  
Windows only for now).

It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window,  
each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, nothing  
bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing changes. It even  
has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com and killing a  
flash player plugin.

You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what  
D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.
Sep 03 2008
next sibling parent bearophile <bearophileHUGS lycos.com> writes:
Denis Koroskin:

Beware that it installs some kind of resident shit, that you have to hunt down
using spyware-removal programs, in three different directories, that runs at
the startup and pings home, and doesn't get removed after the uninstall. So
beside having a really fast JavaScript interpreter (about 20 times faster than
the one of Firefox 2) it's a kind of virus.

Bye,
bearophile
Sep 03 2008
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Alexander Panek <alexander.panek brainsware.org> writes:
Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome 
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/, 
 Windows only for now).
 
 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, 
 each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, 
 nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing 
 changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com 
 and killing a flash player plugin.
 
 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
 
 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what 
 D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads.. I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The website-application feature is also a very handy thing. Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would love having a D port. :P
Sep 03 2008
next sibling parent reply davidl <davidl 126.com> writes:
在 Wed, 03 Sep 2008 22:08:27 +0800,Alexander Panek  
<alexander.panek brainsware.org> 写道:

 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome  
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,  
 Windows only for now).
  It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each  
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin  
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if  
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening  
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
  You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
  This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is  
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads.. I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The website-application feature is also a very handy thing. Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would love having a D port. :P

Who will ever want to port a such big project? 437MB Source tarball(WTF, a browser bigger than OS source base) Google goes the wrong way. It just extends the current web crap not reinvent something smarter. -- 使用 Opera 革命性的电子邮件客户程序: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Sep 03 2008
parent reply Alexander Panek <alexander.panek brainsware.org> writes:
davidl wrote:
 在 Wed, 03 Sep 2008 22:08:27 +0800,Alexander Panek 
 <alexander.panek brainsware.org> 写道:
 
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome 
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/, 
 Windows only for now).
  It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each 
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin 
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if 
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening 
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
  You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
  This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is 
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads.. I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The website-application feature is also a very handy thing. Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would love having a D port. :P

Who will ever want to port a such big project? 437MB Source tarball(WTF, a browser bigger than OS source base)

I suppose you noticed the emoticon (":P") at the end of that sentence.
 Google goes the wrong way. It just extends the current web crap not 
 reinvent something smarter.

Wrong or right, it doesn't extend anything. Google just happened to release a new, blazingly fast browser. I don't know in what way this can be attributed as "web crap" or similar. Do you have any better idea?
Sep 03 2008
parent reply "Chris R. Miller" <lordSaurontheGreat gmail.com> writes:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Alexander Panek wrote:
 davidl wrote:
 =E5=9C=A8 Wed, 03 Sep 2008 22:08:27 +0800=EF=BC=8CAlexander Panek
 <alexander.panek brainsware.org> =E5=86=99=E9=81=93:
 Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would
 love having a D port. :P

Who will ever want to port a such big project? 437MB Source tarball(WTF, a browser bigger than OS source base)

I suppose you noticed the emoticon (":P") at the end of that sentence.

437MB? I gotta go check that out (as in verify, not load my poor disk with even more stuff).
 Google goes the wrong way. It just extends the current web crap not
 reinvent something smarter.

Wrong or right, it doesn't extend anything. Google just happened to release a new, blazingly fast browser. I don't know in what way this ca=

 be attributed as "web crap" or similar. Do you have any better idea?

It's great for Google! Now Mozilla can use the lessons learned from Chrome to make Firefox better! Chrome is Google saying "we want a better browser. So we made a proof of concept for you to both copy and improve upon." I don't think Google is fixated upon webkit at all. They just wanted something quick and easy that they could pop into Chrome, which is mainly about the simplified interface, more survivable process-based design, and the much-faster JavaScript engine. Because Chrome is Open-Source, I see no reason why the Mozilla team and the Chrome team cannot benefit from a little synergy as they learn from each other to build better browsers. True, it's competition, but it's /Open-Source/ competition, the kind where everyone wins.
Sep 03 2008
parent reply "Chris R. Miller" <lordSaurontheGreat gmail.com> writes:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Chris R. Miller wrote:
 Alexander Panek wrote:
 davidl wrote:
 =E5=9C=A8 Wed, 03 Sep 2008 22:08:27 +0800=EF=BC=8CAlexander Panek
 <alexander.panek brainsware.org> =E5=86=99=E9=81=93:
 Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would=




 love having a D port. :P

tarball(WTF, a browser bigger than OS source base)



=20
 437MB?  I gotta go check that out (as in verify, not load my poor disk
 with even more stuff).

I ran, I checked, I became intrigued, so I downloaded and decompressed. Firstly, it's 1.682 GB of raw sources. Secondly, I ran an HDGraph scan of the tree to see where everything is. 199.16 MB of hunspell dictionaries 147.46 MB of Chrome test data 228.31 MB of Chrome tools test data marked as a "reference build" 147.87 MB of webkit layout test results data =3D 722.8 MB of non-code data Therefore 1.682 GB - 722.8 MB =3D 959.2 MB total of source code The Chrome source itself, minus the data and tools data, etc. is only 57.75 MB of source code for the browser itself. The rest is third party libraries, such as Cygwin libraries and what looks to be the better part of 77 MB of a Perl interpreter and attached libraries, 158 MB of "icu38" library sources, etc. It's really no wonder it's such a large download, since all you need to build the browser is MSVC 2005 and the Windows SDK. Otherwise you don't need to go download any of the other things yourself. So on closer inspection is does seem like a more appropriate level of data for a browser. Looking at a few of the source files individually, it does appear that much of the code is reasonable, and that most of the data is just tools for unit tests, etc. Just thought I'd share.
Sep 03 2008
parent renoX <renosky free.fr> writes:
Chris R. Miller a écrit :
 Chris R. Miller wrote:
 Alexander Panek wrote:
 davidl wrote:
 在 Wed, 03 Sep 2008 22:08:27 +0800,Alexander Panek
 <alexander.panek brainsware.org> 写道:
 Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would
 love having a D port. :P

tarball(WTF, a browser bigger than OS source base)


with even more stuff).

I ran, I checked, I became intrigued, so I downloaded and decompressed. Firstly, it's 1.682 GB of raw sources. Secondly, I ran an HDGraph scan of the tree to see where everything is. 199.16 MB of hunspell dictionaries 147.46 MB of Chrome test data 228.31 MB of Chrome tools test data marked as a "reference build" 147.87 MB of webkit layout test results data = 722.8 MB of non-code data Therefore 1.682 GB - 722.8 MB = 959.2 MB total of source code The Chrome source itself, minus the data and tools data, etc. is only 57.75 MB of source code for the browser itself. The rest is third party libraries, such as Cygwin libraries and what looks to be the better part of 77 MB of a Perl interpreter and attached libraries, 158 MB of "icu38" library sources, etc. It's really no wonder it's such a large download, since all you need to build the browser is MSVC 2005 and the Windows SDK. Otherwise you don't need to go download any of the other things yourself. So on closer inspection is does seem like a more appropriate level of data for a browser. Looking at a few of the source files individually, it does appear that much of the code is reasonable, and that most of the data is just tools for unit tests, etc. Just thought I'd share.

Thanks a lot for this detailed explanation. BR, renoX
Sep 19 2008
prev sibling next sibling parent "Chris R. Miller" <lordSaurontheGreat gmail.com> writes:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Alexander Panek wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
 Windows only for now).

 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads.. =20 I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The=

 website-application feature is also a very handy thing.

I'd like it better if it had the Safari-like progress meter in the location bar. IE/FF/Chrome just have a spinning device... so does that mean I can expect it to take an infinitely long time to load and render? Safari at least shows how close to completion it is with the finite progress bar. For some pages it's really nice to see how far it gets before hanging up. It helps in diagnostics, too.
Sep 03 2008
prev sibling parent "Bruce Adams" <tortoise_74 yeah.who.co.uk> writes:
On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 16:46:57 +0100, davidl <davidl 126.com> wrote:

 在 Wed, 03 Sep 2008 22:08:27 +0800,Alexander Panek  
 <alexander.panek brainsware.org> 写道:

 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome  
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,  
 Windows only for now).
  It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each  
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin  
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if  
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening  
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.
  You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
  This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is  
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's funny, just a week ago or so Bartosz Milewski published a blog entry about how processes scale better than threads.. I tried Chrome and I'm really impressed by how responsive it is. Also, the UI is kept very minimalistic, yet it doesn't lack any features. The website-application feature is also a very handy thing. Overall, I'd say Google Chrome is quite an impressive product. Would love having a D port. :P

Who will ever want to port a such big project? 437MB Source tarball(WTF, a browser bigger than OS source base) Google goes the wrong way. It just extends the current web crap not reinvent something smarter.

assumes you have a good design and a good reason to port. Assuming the design is adequate the reason to port would be to demonstrate why D was a better langage than whatever its written in. They don't seem keen to advertise it but it looks like C++ from a quick google.
Sep 06 2008
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome 
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/, 
 Windows only for now).
 
 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each window, 
 each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin crashes, 
 nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if nothing 
 changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening youtube.com 
 and killing a flash player plugin.
 
 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/
 
 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is what 
 D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's probably worth mentioning that IE has offered an option to make each window its own process for as long as I can remember. That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway. Sean
Sep 03 2008
parent reply "Chris R. Miller" <lordSaurontheGreat gmail.com> writes:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Sean Kelly wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
 Windows only for now).

 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

It's probably worth mentioning that IE has offered an option to make each window its own process for as long as I can remember. That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway.

Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only, not Internet Explorer. I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old Explorer). Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been doing anything special along those lines.
Sep 03 2008
next sibling parent reply Robert Fraser <fraserofthenight gmail.com> writes:
Chris R. Miller wrote:
 Sean Kelly wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
 Windows only for now).

 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

each window its own process for as long as I can remember. That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway.

Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only, not Internet Explorer. I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old Explorer). Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been doing anything special along those lines.

Internet Explorer 8 has tabs-as-processes and windows as processes. 7- work like traditional browsers.
Sep 03 2008
parent "Chris R. Miller" <lordSaurontheGreat gmail.com> writes:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Robert Fraser wrote:
 Chris R. Miller wrote:
 Sean Kelly wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/=




 Windows only for now).

 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening=




 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

each window its own process for as long as I can remember. That said=



 the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as =



 platform" is ever going to make headway.

Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only=


 not Internet Explorer.  I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and
 didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old
 Explorer).  Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't be=


 doing anything special along those lines.

Internet Explorer 8 has tabs-as-processes and windows as processes. 7- work like traditional browsers.

Interesting. I hope they kept the memory use down. I warmed up IE7 from a five-month period of inactivity and used Chrome to monitor its memory use. I opened up the same pages as I had in Chrome (with the exception of the memory window) and found IE to use less memory by almost 15 MB. Then again, I had been using Chrome for a while, and it was a fresh instance of IE. But a 15MB disparity I didn't think I could resolve by restarting Chrome.
Sep 03 2008
prev sibling parent reply Sean Kelly <sean invisibleduck.org> writes:
Chris R. Miller wrote:
 Sean Kelly wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
 Windows only for now).

 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

each window its own process for as long as I can remember. That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway.

Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only, not Internet Explorer. I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old Explorer). Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been doing anything special along those lines.

Huh... I could have sworn there was an IE setting for this. Ah well. Sean
Sep 03 2008
parent Bruno Medeiros <brunodomedeiros+spam com.gmail> writes:
Sean Kelly wrote:
 Chris R. Miller wrote:
 Sean Kelly wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 You already know that Google is making a buzz with their new Chrome
 browser.
 Go download and test it if you didn't do yet (www.google.com/chrome/,
 Windows only for now).

 It is heavily multi-threaded and uses separate process for each
 window, each tab, each plugin etc. When one tab hags or a plugin
 crashes, nothing bad happens. The browser continues working as if
 nothing changes. It even has a built-in process manager, try opening
 youtube.com and killing a flash player plugin.

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

 This is an example of process-based designs implementation which is
 what D2 aims at, and it is clearly a success.

each window its own process for as long as I can remember. That said, the idea of rethinking browsers in general is a good one, if "web as a platform" is ever going to make headway.

Ehrm, I think that the Window as a Process feature is in Explorer only, not Internet Explorer. I quickly checked my Internet Explorer and didn't find that feature (though I know it's there for just plain-old Explorer). Explorer isn't a web browser AFAIK, so IE really hasn't been doing anything special along those lines.

Huh... I could have sworn there was an IE setting for this. Ah well. Sean

Nope, but you can control it somewhat: in IE6 (and IE7 too I think) if you open a new browser from an existing one (Open in New Window) it will use the same process. But if you run the iexplorer.exe executable it will launch a new process. -- Bruno Medeiros - Software Developer, MSc. in CS/E graduate http://www.prowiki.org/wiki4d/wiki.cgi?BrunoMedeiros#D
Sep 19 2008
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Manfred_Nowak" <svv1999 hotmail.com> writes:
Denis Koroskin wrote:

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

On page 16 they mention "precise GC". -manfred -- If life is going to exist in this Universe, then the one thing it cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion. (Douglas Adams)
Sep 04 2008
parent reply Tomas Lindquist Olsen <tomas famolsen.dk> writes:
Manfred_Nowak wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 
 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

On page 16 they mention "precise GC". -manfred

Are you suggesting we should start talking about how this could be done in D ? -Tomas
Sep 04 2008
next sibling parent Christopher Wright <dhasenan gmail.com> writes:
Tomas Lindquist Olsen wrote:
 Manfred_Nowak wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

On page 16 they mention "precise GC". -manfred

Are you suggesting we should start talking about how this could be done in D ? -Tomas

It would require compiler support. It would require emitting pointer maps for each stack frame and each object. It's relatively straightforward. If you align pointers on word boundaries, you only have to store one bit per word; else, one bit per byte; so this is not a terribly large overhead (no more than a couple bytes for a typical function, probably). It wouldn't be terribly fast, but it probably wouldn't be an extreme slowdown either, most likely.
Sep 04 2008
prev sibling parent reply Christopher Wright <dhasenan gmail.com> writes:
Tomas Lindquist Olsen wrote:
 Manfred_Nowak wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:

 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

On page 16 they mention "precise GC". -manfred

Are you suggesting we should start talking about how this could be done in D ? -Tomas

A major benefit of a precise GC is that you can turn it into a moving GC. Without a precise GC, you might change some random sequences of bytes to something else because it looks like a pointer to something you moved; not so with a precise GC.
Sep 04 2008
parent reply Fawzi Mohamed <fmohamed mac.com> writes:
On 2008-09-05 03:06:24 +0200, Christopher Wright <dhasenan gmail.com> said:

 Tomas Lindquist Olsen wrote:
 Manfred_Nowak wrote:
 Denis Koroskin wrote:
 
 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

On page 16 they mention "precise GC". -manfred

Are you suggesting we should start talking about how this could be done in D ? -Tomas

A major benefit of a precise GC is that you can turn it into a moving GC. Without a precise GC, you might change some random sequences of bytes to something else because it looks like a pointer to something you moved; not so with a precise GC.

well as long as you have unions, then you have to be *very* careful about not moving them. In safe D this is not an issue. Fawzi
Sep 05 2008
parent Christopher Wright <dhasenan gmail.com> writes:
Fawzi Mohamed wrote:
 On 2008-09-05 03:06:24 +0200, Christopher Wright <dhasenan gmail.com> said:
 A major benefit of a precise GC is that you can turn it into a moving 
 GC. Without a precise GC, you might change some random sequences of 
 bytes to something else because it looks like a pointer to something 
 you moved; not so with a precise GC.

well as long as you have unions, then you have to be *very* careful about not moving them. In safe D this is not an issue. Fawzi

Ach, bugger the unions. Now you need two bits per word: one for whether it contains pointers and one for whether it pins anything it points to, assuming it's a pointer. Unions containing pointers (punions) would be pinning pointers, and you could probably use some sort of pragma to indicate that a pointer should pin whatever it points to. In the presence of a punion, a garbage collector would be conservative. Otherwise it could be precise.
Sep 05 2008
prev sibling parent reply "Steven Schveighoffer" <schveiguy yahoo.com> writes:
"Denis Koroskin" wrote
 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

Hey, this comic is really awesome for explaining things! The author did a great job. Any artists out there that can explain the D benefits this way? I think that might go a long way for newb's. -Steve
Sep 04 2008
next sibling parent Alexander Panek <alexander.panek brainsware.org> writes:
Steven Schveighoffer wrote:
 Hey, this comic is really awesome for explaining things!  The author did a 
 great job.  Any artists out there that can explain the D benefits this way? 
 I think that might go a long way for newb's.

That's certainly true! Though, they should've kept it a tad shorter. It was kind of getting boring at some point.
Sep 04 2008
prev sibling parent reply "Bill Baxter" <wbaxter gmail.com> writes:
On Thu, Sep 4, 2008 at 10:14 PM, Steven Schveighoffer
<schveiguy yahoo.com> wrote:
 "Denis Koroskin" wrote
 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

Hey, this comic is really awesome for explaining things! The author did a great job. Any artists out there that can explain the D benefits this way? I think that might go a long way for newb's. -Steve

I was reading that comic thinking man this guy *must* have really studied those "understanding comics" books because he's using all the techniques just like they're described in that book. Turns out the comic was done by Scott McCloud, who *is* the Understanding Comics books guy. So looks like all we have to do is pay Scott McCloud large sums of cash and he will make us a nice comic for D too! --bb
Sep 04 2008
parent Bruno Medeiros <brunodomedeiros+spam com.gmail> writes:
Bill Baxter wrote:
 On Thu, Sep 4, 2008 at 10:14 PM, Steven Schveighoffer
 <schveiguy yahoo.com> wrote:
 "Denis Koroskin" wrote
 You can read the whole story at www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/

great job. Any artists out there that can explain the D benefits this way? I think that might go a long way for newb's. -Steve

I was reading that comic thinking man this guy *must* have really studied those "understanding comics" books because he's using all the techniques just like they're described in that book. Turns out the comic was done by Scott McCloud, who *is* the Understanding Comics books guy. So looks like all we have to do is pay Scott McCloud large sums of cash and he will make us a nice comic for D too! --bb

Let's have him do a comic explaining Walter why C-legacy is bad, and why Java style is (usually) good. -- Bruno Medeiros - Software Developer, MSc. in CS/E graduate http://www.prowiki.org/wiki4d/wiki.cgi?BrunoMedeiros#D
Sep 19 2008