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digitalmars.D - Future of D on alternate platforms

reply "Frustrated" <c1514843 drdrb.com> writes:
How difficult is it to port D code to future projects on
alternate platforms(mainly coming from win) and, if needed be, a
compiler for those platforms?

At this point, I'm wondering how difficult code I'm writing for
windows will be to port to, say, the iOS, mac, arm, and more
likely, embedded systems such as the tigerSharc, etc.

I've heard many times the LLVM compiler mentioned in the forums
and it seems to be able to compile D code to any platform the
compiler supports(but somehow independent of D... maybe it
compiles it to an intermediate language?).

My goal at this point is to use D on windows to create some
algorithmic software and then potentially port it to some
embedded system with minimal rewrite of the core code. e.g., I
don't want to have to rewrite the algorithms in C and use the
compiler tools for that system. If that was the case there is
little reason to use D in the first place.

Obviously there is no magic compiler that will do it all. I'm
curious though as to the possibility. In 2 years could one expect
D to be more widely used on other systems? I see people already
getting D started on ARM and iOS so it seems feasible that in the
near future it would be relatively easy to port the
code(obviously there are functional differences due to the OS but
I'm talking about the cpu issues at this point).
Feb 21 2014
next sibling parent "Joakim" <joakim airpost.net> writes:
On Friday, 21 February 2014 at 20:55:58 UTC, Frustrated wrote:
 How difficult is it to port D code to future projects on
 alternate platforms(mainly coming from win) and, if needed be, a
 compiler for those platforms?

 At this point, I'm wondering how difficult code I'm writing for
 windows will be to port to, say, the iOS, mac, arm, and more
 likely, embedded systems such as the tigerSharc, etc.

As for the rest, they're being actively developed, but certainly not ready yet.
 I've heard many times the LLVM compiler mentioned in the forums
 and it seems to be able to compile D code to any platform the
 compiler supports(but somehow independent of D... maybe it
 compiles it to an intermediate language?).

that's only the base of platform support. There are many other integration issues. But that hasn't stopped the LDC developers from providing decent support for linux/PowerPC, for example: http://wiki.dlang.org/LDC
 My goal at this point is to use D on windows to create some
 algorithmic software and then potentially port it to some
 embedded system with minimal rewrite of the core code. e.g., I
 don't want to have to rewrite the algorithms in C and use the
 compiler tools for that system. If that was the case there is
 little reason to use D in the first place.

support anywhere near the number of platforms as C/C++, at least not yet.
 Obviously there is no magic compiler that will do it all. I'm
 curious though as to the possibility. In 2 years could one 
 expect
 D to be more widely used on other systems? I see people already
 getting D started on ARM and iOS so it seems feasible that in 
 the
 near future it would be relatively easy to port the
 code(obviously there are functional differences due to the OS 
 but
 I'm talking about the cpu issues at this point).

being made, but no promises can be made. Given the amount of architectures that llvm supports, I don't think code generation for different CPUs will be the problem, more likely OS integration issues. Depending on the platform, you may have to roll your sleeves up and pitch in.
Feb 22 2014
prev sibling parent "Kai Nacke" <kai redstar.de> writes:
On Friday, 21 February 2014 at 20:55:58 UTC, Frustrated wrote:
 How difficult is it to port D code to future projects on
 alternate platforms(mainly coming from win) and, if needed be, a
 compiler for those platforms?

 At this point, I'm wondering how difficult code I'm writing for
 windows will be to port to, say, the iOS, mac, arm, and more
 likely, embedded systems such as the tigerSharc, etc.

 I've heard many times the LLVM compiler mentioned in the forums
 and it seems to be able to compile D code to any platform the
 compiler supports(but somehow independent of D... maybe it
 compiles it to an intermediate language?).

 My goal at this point is to use D on windows to create some
 algorithmic software and then potentially port it to some
 embedded system with minimal rewrite of the core code. e.g., I
 don't want to have to rewrite the algorithms in C and use the
 compiler tools for that system. If that was the case there is
 little reason to use D in the first place.

 Obviously there is no magic compiler that will do it all. I'm
 curious though as to the possibility. In 2 years could one 
 expect
 D to be more widely used on other systems? I see people already
 getting D started on ARM and iOS so it seems feasible that in 
 the
 near future it would be relatively easy to port the
 code(obviously there are functional differences due to the OS 
 but
 I'm talking about the cpu issues at this point).

Hi Frustrated! With LDC, you can potential target all platforms supported by LLVM. The big problem is the runtime support. Some of the modules are very low-level and you have to implement them for every platform (e.g. core.thread, the vararg interface or exception handling). This is not always easy. On ARM, there is a bug in the exception handling code. PPC64 has good support (there are still bugs, too!) but PPC32 requires more work. I currently evaluate if I can add support for MIPS64, too. LDC has still a cross-compiling issue with floating points but I already have a fix for this (which requires more testing before commit). If the CPU of your device is already supported by the runtime, then you can reach your goal. At Phobos level, the biggest difference between devices is accuracy of real data type (may be different!). BTW: Which is your target platform? Regards, Kai
Feb 26 2014