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digitalmars.D - D on GDC announced on reddit

reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/l3tk5/merging_in_the_gnu_d_language_compiler_to_gcc/

Andrei
Oct 06 2011
next sibling parent Iain Buclaw <ibuclaw ubuntu.com> writes:
== Quote from Andrei Alexandrescu (SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org)'s article

 Andrei

Cool beans. Iain
Oct 07 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Walter Bright <newshound2 digitalmars.com> writes:
On 10/6/2011 9:39 PM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/l3tk5/merging_in_the_gnu_d_language_compiler_to_gcc/

On Hacker News too: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3083125
Oct 07 2011
next sibling parent reply Trass3r <un known.com> writes:
Am 07.10.2011, 11:27 Uhr, schrieb Walter Bright  
<newshound2 digitalmars.com>:

 On 10/6/2011 9:39 PM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/l3tk5/merging_in_the_gnu_d_language_compiler_to_gcc/

On Hacker News too: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3083125

And again they immediately start with the Go vs. D discussions.
Oct 07 2011
parent reply "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp progtools.org> writes:
That will always happen.

My self I think that Go is a better C and D a better C++. It remains to be 
seen how much they
will be able to take from C and C++.

Personaly I have been spending most of the time with Go, because of its 
similarity with Oberon. It
brings back some good memories.

Now D is also quite cool, I would just like for the language compilers to be 
a bit more stable.

Currently I do have more sucess proposing C++11 based solutions as Go or D 
based ones, on the
type of corporate environment I work in.

Anyway, nice work!

"Trass3r" <un known.com> wrote in message news:op.v2zd1eb43ncmek enigma...
 Am 07.10.2011, 11:27 Uhr, schrieb Walter Bright 
 <newshound2 digitalmars.com>:

 On 10/6/2011 9:39 PM, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/l3tk5/merging_in_the_gnu_d_language_compiler_to_gcc/

On Hacker News too: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3083125

And again they immediately start with the Go vs. D discussions.

Oct 07 2011
parent reply "Nick Sabalausky" <a a.a> writes:
"Trass3r" <un known.com> wrote in message news:op.v2ze74ma3ncmek enigma...
 Now D is also quite cool, I would just like for the language compilers 
 to be a bit more stable.

They have been vastly improving, really.
 Currently I do have more sucess proposing C++11 based solutions as Go or 
 D based ones, on the type of corporate environment I work in.

That's not D's or Go's fault. Most guys especially in bigger corporations are plain ignorant and wear blinders. Strangely that even applies to universities.

Not real surprising. Universities can be *enormously* ignorant and conceited. (Community colleges too...my god, some of the flaming egos and politics around there are mind-boggling, especially considering it's *just* a CC...)
 Hell, they didn't even know  about clang even though they were progressive 
 enough to use C++0x.

I once had a university professor who openly admitted C was the only language he knew - and yet he didn't even understand how C's null-terminated strings work. So he didn't really even know that one language.
Oct 07 2011
next sibling parent deadalnix <deadalnix gmail.com> writes:
Le 07/10/2011 17:49, Trass3r a écrit :
 Hell, they didn't even know about clang even though they were
 progressive enough to use C++0x.

I once had a university professor who openly admitted C was the only language he knew - and yet he didn't even understand how C's null-terminated strings work. So he didn't really even know that one language.

Had a workmate who apparently was real good at using C for microprocessor programming. But he didn't have the slightest clue about how C++ works and what OOP overhead really means. And when I used Lua to create a small conversion script (which was only needed cause the legacy code was crap, hardcoded paths and the like) that even turned into some kind of running gag. I don't need to say that nobody had ever heard of it nor was anyone willing to try it out before judging.

You can do function pointer in C and thus, do OOP manually. He probably already did that without really knowing this is OOP.
Oct 10 2011
prev sibling parent simendsjo <simendsjo gmail.com> writes:
On 10.10.2011 22:35, Simen Kjaeraas wrote:
 On Fri, 07 Oct 2011 17:11:45 +0200, Nick Sabalausky <a a.a> wrote:

 "Trass3r" <un known.com> wrote in message
 news:op.v2ze74ma3ncmek enigma...
 Now D is also quite cool, I would just like for the language compilers
 to be a bit more stable.

They have been vastly improving, really.
 Currently I do have more sucess proposing C++11 based solutions as
 Go or
 D based ones, on the type of corporate environment I work in.

That's not D's or Go's fault. Most guys especially in bigger corporations are plain ignorant and wear blinders. Strangely that even applies to universities.

Not real surprising. Universities can be *enormously* ignorant and conceited. (Community colleges too...my god, some of the flaming egos and politics around there are mind-boggling, especially considering it's *just* a CC...)
 Hell, they didn't even know about clang even though they were
 progressive
 enough to use C++0x.

I once had a university professor who openly admitted C was the only language he knew - and yet he didn't even understand how C's null-terminated strings work. So he didn't really even know that one language.

I helped a friend with some assignments from a professor who wrote absolutely unreadable code, and who taught students to use int[101] to allocate 100 ints, because he couldn't grasp indexing from 0 to 99. I also really liked the assignment where we were told of a mythical processor that would multiply 2 NxN matrices in O(N^4) time.

Wow.. Looking forward to start my CS degree next year... :)
Oct 10 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Trass3r <un known.com> writes:
 Now D is also quite cool, I would just like for the language compilers  
 to be a bit more stable.

They have been vastly improving, really.
 Currently I do have more sucess proposing C++11 based solutions as Go or  
 D based ones, on the type of corporate environment I work in.

That's not D's or Go's fault. Most guys especially in bigger corporations are plain ignorant and wear blinders. Strangely that even applies to universities. Hell, they didn't even know about clang even though they were progressive enough to use C++0x.
Oct 07 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent Trass3r <un known.com> writes:
 Hell, they didn't even know  about clang even though they were  
 progressive enough to use C++0x.

I once had a university professor who openly admitted C was the only language he knew - and yet he didn't even understand how C's null-terminated strings work. So he didn't really even know that one language.

Had a workmate who apparently was real good at using C for microprocessor programming. But he didn't have the slightest clue about how C++ works and what OOP overhead really means. And when I used Lua to create a small conversion script (which was only needed cause the legacy code was crap, hardcoded paths and the like) that even turned into some kind of running gag. I don't need to say that nobody had ever heard of it nor was anyone willing to try it out before judging.
Oct 07 2011
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Simen Kjaeraas" <simen.kjaras gmail.com> writes:
On Fri, 07 Oct 2011 17:11:45 +0200, Nick Sabalausky <a a.a> wrote:

 "Trass3r" <un known.com> wrote in message  
 news:op.v2ze74ma3ncmek enigma...
 Now D is also quite cool, I would just like for the language compilers
 to be a bit more stable.

They have been vastly improving, really.
 Currently I do have more sucess proposing C++11 based solutions as Go  
 or
 D based ones, on the type of corporate environment I work in.

That's not D's or Go's fault. Most guys especially in bigger corporations are plain ignorant and wear blinders. Strangely that even applies to universities.

Not real surprising. Universities can be *enormously* ignorant and conceited. (Community colleges too...my god, some of the flaming egos and politics around there are mind-boggling, especially considering it's *just* a CC...)
 Hell, they didn't even know  about clang even though they were  
 progressive
 enough to use C++0x.

I once had a university professor who openly admitted C was the only language he knew - and yet he didn't even understand how C's null-terminated strings work. So he didn't really even know that one language.

I helped a friend with some assignments from a professor who wrote absolutely unreadable code, and who taught students to use int[101] to allocate 100 ints, because he couldn't grasp indexing from 0 to 99. I also really liked the assignment where we were told of a mythical processor that would multiply 2 NxN matrices in O(N^4) time. -- Simen
Oct 10 2011
parent Bane <branimir.milosavljevic gmail.com> writes:
Simen Kjaeraas Wrote:

 On Fri, 07 Oct 2011 17:11:45 +0200, Nick Sabalausky <a a.a> wrote:
 
 "Trass3r" <un known.com> wrote in message  
 news:op.v2ze74ma3ncmek enigma...
 Now D is also quite cool, I would just like for the language compilers
 to be a bit more stable.

They have been vastly improving, really.
 Currently I do have more sucess proposing C++11 based solutions as Go  
 or
 D based ones, on the type of corporate environment I work in.

That's not D's or Go's fault. Most guys especially in bigger corporations are plain ignorant and wear blinders. Strangely that even applies to universities.

Not real surprising. Universities can be *enormously* ignorant and conceited. (Community colleges too...my god, some of the flaming egos and politics around there are mind-boggling, especially considering it's *just* a CC...)
 Hell, they didn't even know  about clang even though they were  
 progressive
 enough to use C++0x.

I once had a university professor who openly admitted C was the only language he knew - and yet he didn't even understand how C's null-terminated strings work. So he didn't really even know that one language.

I helped a friend with some assignments from a professor who wrote absolutely unreadable code, and who taught students to use int[101] to allocate 100 ints, because he couldn't grasp indexing from 0 to 99. I also really liked the assignment where we were told of a mythical processor that would multiply 2 NxN matrices in O(N^4) time. -- Simen

Those who know, work with it. Those who don't know, teach it.
Oct 10 2011
prev sibling parent Andrew Wiley <wiley.andrew.j gmail.com> writes:
On Mon, Oct 10, 2011 at 4:04 PM, Bane <branimir.milosavljevic gmail.com> wr=
ote:
 Simen Kjaeraas Wrote:

 On Fri, 07 Oct 2011 17:11:45 +0200, Nick Sabalausky <a a.a> wrote:

 "Trass3r" <un known.com> wrote in message
 news:op.v2ze74ma3ncmek enigma...
 Now D is also quite cool, I would just like for the language compile=





 to be a bit more stable.

They have been vastly improving, really.
 Currently I do have more sucess proposing C++11 based solutions as G=





 or
 D based ones, on the type of corporate environment I work in.

That's not D's or Go's fault. Most guys especially in bigger corporations are plain ignorant and wear blinders. Strangely that even applies to universities.

Not real surprising. Universities can be *enormously* ignorant and conceited. (Community colleges too...my god, some of the flaming egos =



 politics around there are mind-boggling, especially considering it's
 *just*
 a CC...)

 Hell, they didn't even know =A0about clang even though they were
 progressive
 enough to use C++0x.

I once had a university professor who openly admitted C was the only language he knew - and yet he didn't even understand how C's null-terminated strings work. So he didn't really even know that one language.

I helped a friend with some assignments from a professor who wrote absolutely unreadable code, and who taught students to use int[101] to allocate 100 ints, because he couldn't grasp indexing from 0 to 99. I also really liked the assignment where we were told of a mythical processor that would multiply 2 NxN matrices in O(N^4) time. -- =A0 =A0Simen

Those who know, work with it. Those who don't know, teach it.

I'm at a research university, and I haven't really had this problem at all. I've had a professor teach us his commandments of multithreaded programming who admitted he used to be a bit of a hypocrite according to his own rules, but that's about it. I even have one professor who just came back from a one year sabbatical in which he worked at a startup.
Oct 10 2011
prev sibling parent reply Jesse Phillips <jessekphillips+D gmail.com> writes:
Andrei Alexandrescu Wrote:

 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/l3tk5/merging_in_the_gnu_d_language_compiler_to_gcc/
 
 Andrei

I like your comment about being in 1981. If I'm not mistaken, what he describes in this http://youtu.be/HxaD_trXwRE?t=7m55s is that toString is a Unique addition to Go.
Oct 07 2011
parent "Paulo Pinto" <pjmlp progtools.org> writes:
I like Go's simplicity and somehow I am attracted to it due to the some of 
its Oberon influences.

Now, everyone with a proper computer science background will immediatly see 
that all the
features that are sold as Go unique features, are already available for long 
time in other languages,
only not in C or to a certain extent C++.

Go might eventually become a nice C sucessor, but it will never be able to 
replace C++, Java, D,
or any other current languages that offer much better programming 
abstractions.

--
Paulo

"Jesse Phillips" <jessekphillips+D gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:j6nh24$2deh$1 digitalmars.com...
 Andrei Alexandrescu Wrote:

 http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/l3tk5/merging_in_the_gnu_d_language_compiler_to_gcc/

 Andrei

I like your comment about being in 1981. If I'm not mistaken, what he describes in this http://youtu.be/HxaD_trXwRE?t=7m55s is that toString is a Unique addition to Go.

Oct 08 2011