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digitalmars.D - Adam Ruppe donates Windows cycles to dmd/phobos

reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
I wanted to thank Adam Ruppe for kindly donating a ssh-accessible 
Windows machine for testing Phobos on Windows. After a fight with 
various '/' vs. '\' and other issues, I finally got the build and 
unittest process automated. Thanks, Adam!

Andrei

P.S. A few details for those interested in getting similar setups 
working - Phobos' makefile, although it runs on a Linux machine, 
connects to Windows via ssh for each compilation by running "ssh 
machinename dmd ..." instead of "dmd ...". The socket is reused such 
that only the first connection negotiates the keys (a fairly recent ssh 
feature, see e.g. 
http://www.tipcache.com/tip/Reuse_an_existing_ssh_connection_9.html), 
and the mapping of remote directories to local directories is done by 
using fuse (http://fuse.sourceforge.net/sshfs.html).

P.P.S. If anyone could offer ssh access to other systems aside from 
Windows and Ubuntu (namely, other Linux distros and OSX) that would be 
great - let Walter or me know. The account should only be able to run 
dmd and won't be heavily used.
Jul 11 2009
parent reply Tim Matthews <tim.matthews7 gmail.com> writes:
Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 I wanted to thank Adam Ruppe for kindly donating a ssh-accessible 
 Windows machine for testing Phobos on Windows. After a fight with 
 various '/' vs. '\' and other issues, I finally got the build and 
 unittest process automated. Thanks, Adam!
 
 Andrei
 
 P.S. A few details for those interested in getting similar setups 
 working - Phobos' makefile, although it runs on a Linux machine, 
 connects to Windows via ssh for each compilation by running "ssh 
 machinename dmd ..." instead of "dmd ...". The socket is reused such 
 that only the first connection negotiates the keys (a fairly recent ssh 
 feature, see e.g. 
 http://www.tipcache.com/tip/Reuse_an_existing_ssh_connection_9.html), 
 and the mapping of remote directories to local directories is done by 
 using fuse (http://fuse.sourceforge.net/sshfs.html).
 
 P.P.S. If anyone could offer ssh access to other systems aside from 
 Windows and Ubuntu (namely, other Linux distros and OSX) that would be 
 great - let Walter or me know. The account should only be able to run 
 dmd and won't be heavily used.

If someone has the money, bandwidth and other resources to give 247 access to a machine then why don't they have a vm with all the os you require? Setting up vm's is trivial and can be done using free software too.
Jul 12 2009
next sibling parent reply Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
Tim Matthews wrote:
 Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 I wanted to thank Adam Ruppe for kindly donating a ssh-accessible 
 Windows machine for testing Phobos on Windows. After a fight with 
 various '/' vs. '\' and other issues, I finally got the build and 
 unittest process automated. Thanks, Adam!

 Andrei

 P.S. A few details for those interested in getting similar setups 
 working - Phobos' makefile, although it runs on a Linux machine, 
 connects to Windows via ssh for each compilation by running "ssh 
 machinename dmd ..." instead of "dmd ...". The socket is reused such 
 that only the first connection negotiates the keys (a fairly recent 
 ssh feature, see e.g. 
 http://www.tipcache.com/tip/Reuse_an_existing_ssh_connection_9.html), 
 and the mapping of remote directories to local directories is done by 
 using fuse (http://fuse.sourceforge.net/sshfs.html).

 P.P.S. If anyone could offer ssh access to other systems aside from 
 Windows and Ubuntu (namely, other Linux distros and OSX) that would be 
 great - let Walter or me know. The account should only be able to run 
 dmd and won't be heavily used.

If someone has the money, bandwidth and other resources to give 247 access to a machine then why don't they have a vm with all the os you require? Setting up vm's is trivial and can be done using free software too.

It's trivial for those who knows how to do it. For someone like me, setting up several VMs for various OSs would be a time-consuming undertaking. I wouldn't know even which are the most important distros to cater for. I'm thinking of a simpler scenario in which someone already owns some Linux distro or OSX on an almost-always-on machine. Then it should be easy to create a restricted account. Andrei
Jul 12 2009
parent Andrei Alexandrescu <SeeWebsiteForEmail erdani.org> writes:
Adam D. Ruppe wrote:
 I'll look into it and let you know at some point later in the week.

Wow! That would be too awesome! Andrei P.S. By the way, things got hung on the Windows machine so I issued a kill -9 -1. I thought that would be restricted enough to only kill my processes, but apparently sshd went down too. So now I can't ssh anymore. Any chance you could restart sshd? It might be dawning on you as well as myself that offering server access is not as trouble-free as it seems, so be careful what other OSs you want to make available :o).
Jul 12 2009
prev sibling parent "Adam D. Ruppe" <destructionator gmail.com> writes:
On Sun, Jul 12, 2009 at 08:14:23PM -0500, Andrei Alexandrescu wrote:
 I wouldn't know even which are the most important distros 
 to cater for.

My guess would be CentOS or Fedora in addition to your Ubuntu, and then maybe Slackware. Ubuntu should basically cover the Debian branch of Linux, and adding CentOS or Fedora would cover the Red Hat branch. Then Slackware covers the actual good linux :P Trying to go much more than this would be futile. There are just too many distros out there, and too many versions of each distro to try and cover them all. But these three would hopefully cover a good chunk of them due to evolutionary heritage. It would be the best bang for the buck. If you want to branch out the test suite into other Unixes, hitting FreeBSD and Open Solaris would be the next two on the top of the list that I'd suggest. I've seen mention of them in the D changelog too, so I think Walter is leaning that way as well, for D1 anyway. I can probably provide ssh access for you to each of these systems (though my slackware box is my home computer, which is a bit of a Frankenstein's monster, so maybe not an ideal testbed...) The only thing I definitely can't help with is OS X. I'll look into it and let you know at some point later in the week. -- Adam D. Ruppe http://arsdnet.net
Jul 12 2009