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digitalmars.D - Posting code from the web interface

reply Ant <Ant_member pathlink.com> writes:
I think I remember that if the indented code start with a "."
the indentation is preserved.
(Now that I write this I also remember that that was changed)

let's try it:

".    printf("four spaces before this");" results in:

    printf("four spaces before this");

".	printf("one tab before this");" results in:

	printf("one tab before this");

			Ant
Jun 21 2004
next sibling parent reply Ant <Ant_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cb87k2$aq1$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Ant says...
I think I remember that if the indented code start with a "."
the indentation is preserved.
(Now that I write this I also remember that that was changed)

let's try it:

".    printf("four spaces before this");" results in:

    printf("four spaces before this");

".	printf("one tab before this");" results in:

	printf("one tab before this");

			Ant

see!, it works! so instead of "#" or "|" or any other char "." (dot) is the way to go :) Ant
Jun 21 2004
parent reply Arcane Jill <Arcane_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cb88d4$bq6$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Ant says...

see!, it works!

so instead of "#" or "|" or any other char "." (dot) is the way to go :)

Ant

Let's do another experiment then. The following line will consist of a single dot and nothing else. There will be some more text after that...
Jun 22 2004
parent reply Arcane Jill <Arcane_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cb95h3$1o6q$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Arcane Jill says...
Let's do another experiment then. The following line will consist of a single
dot and nothing else. There will be some more text after that...

So where did it go? It would seem that something went wrong there. Dot appears NOT to be a good character to use if your text-to-indent contains blank lines. Everything after such a line will be truncated. I'm going to stick to using > Arcane Jill
Jun 22 2004
next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Julio_C=E9sar_Carrascal_Urquijo?= writes:
Arcane Jill wrote:

 I'm going to stick to using >
 
 Arcane Jill

May I suggest you don't. Your code examples always seems like quoted text from the previous message (Specially in Thunderbird. Maybe you could use "|" or ":". -- Julio CÚsar Carrascal Urquijo http://jcesar.f2o.org/
Jun 22 2004
prev sibling next sibling parent Derek <derek psyc.ward> writes:
On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 11:40:41 +0000 (UTC), Arcane Jill wrote:

 In article <cb95h3$1o6q$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Arcane Jill says...
Let's do another experiment then. The following line will consist of a single
dot and nothing else. There will be some more text after that...

So where did it go? It would seem that something went wrong there. Dot appears NOT to be a good character to use if your text-to-indent contains blank lines. Everything after such a line will be truncated. I'm going to stick to using > Arcane Jill

If is okay by you, could you use something other than '>'? Every time I see your code examples, it looks like you are quoting somebody else's code from previous posting. A bit confusing. Most news clients use '>' as the default 'quoting' indicator. -- Derek Melbourne, Australia
Jun 22 2004
prev sibling parent reply Hauke Duden <H.NS.Duden gmx.net> writes:
Arcane Jill wrote:
 In article <cb95h3$1o6q$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Arcane Jill says...
 
Let's do another experiment then. The following line will consist of a single
dot and nothing else. There will be some more text after that...

So where did it go? It would seem that something went wrong there. Dot appears NOT to be a good character to use if your text-to-indent contains blank lines. Everything after such a line will be truncated.

This is probably a bug (or rather a missing feature) in your email client. The SMTP protocol uses a line that consists of only a single dot as the end-of-message marker. So if the email client doesn't do some magic (like automatically inserting some whitespace, for example) the receiving server will cut the message off there. Hauke
Jun 22 2004
parent reply Arcane Jill <Arcane_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cb9g6b$29iq$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Hauke Duden says...
This is probably a bug (or rather a missing feature) in your email 
client.

What email client? Posting to this forum is via a web interface. I'm using a browser, not an email client.
The SMTP protocol uses a line that consists of only a single dot 
as the end-of-message marker. So if the email client doesn't do some 
magic (like automatically inserting some whitespace, for example) the 
receiving server will cut the message off there.

Hauke

Yeah, I know, which is why it occurred to me to do that particular experiment. But - surely - the protocol used ought to be HTTP, not SMTP - this being a web interface. Anyway, there have been enough persuasive arguments on this thread to convince me that # is the most sensible choice. Use of # means that people can just cut and paste the text fragment into a text editor, and then use search and replace to replace # with nothing, and bingo, valid source code. (Okay, so there COULD be # characters in strings, but for most code fragments this will be fine). Arcane Jill
Jun 22 2004
parent Hauke Duden <H.NS.Duden gmx.net> writes:
Arcane Jill wrote:
This is probably a bug (or rather a missing feature) in your email 
client.

What email client? Posting to this forum is via a web interface. I'm using a browser, not an email client.

Ah, so you use that HTML forum interface on the website. I tried that once but quickly got lost :). I assumed you accessed this newsgroup directly. So the bug/missing feature seems to be in the HTML layer that sits on top of the newsgroup. Hauke
Jun 22 2004
prev sibling parent Ivan Senji <ivan.senji public.srce.hr> writes:
Ant wrote:
 I think I remember that if the indented code start with a "."
 the indentation is preserved.
 (Now that I write this I also remember that that was changed)
 
 let's try it:
 
 ".    printf("four spaces before this");" results in:
 
     printf("four spaces before this");
 
 ".	printf("one tab before this");" results in:
 
 	printf("one tab before this");
 
 			Ant
 
 

I think # is better because it cannot appear in code, if i wanted to copy your code and try it out, i have to remove the . in each line, and i can't just ReplaceAll . with " " because that will mess up the code. Replacing all # with " " wouldn't do anything bad.
Jun 22 2004