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digitalmars.D - Bug or Feature?

reply leoandru gmail.com writes:
I started coding in D a few days now but I ran into a few problems, I wasn't
sure if these were bugs so I didnt make a bug report. the problem is with
interface inheritance and method signatures It doesn't ssem to work as expected
and I don't see any documentation saying otherwise.

interface A
{
void method();
}


interface B : A
{
void method(int a);
}


class Foo : B
{
}


B ref = new Foo();
ref.method();   //doesnt compile, requires an argument.

This works if the method name in interface B is different from A, Im able to
call method from interface. Am I doing something wrong? I expected this to work.
I'm using dmd 0.160 compile on winxp. Thanks for any help/replies!
Jun 13 2006
next sibling parent reply Frits van Bommel <fvbommel REMwOVExCAPSs.nl> writes:
leoandru gmail.com wrote:
 I started coding in D a few days now but I ran into a few problems, I wasn't
 sure if these were bugs so I didnt make a bug report. the problem is with
 interface inheritance and method signatures It doesn't ssem to work as expected
 and I don't see any documentation saying otherwise.
 
 interface A
 {
 void method();
 }
 
 
 interface B : A
 {

alias A.method method;
 void method(int a);
 }
 
 
 class Foo : B
 {

void method() { writefln("method()"); } void method(int a) { writefln("method(", a, ")"); }
 }
 
 

void main() { B ref = new Foo(); ref.method(); ref.method(1); } /*
 B ref = new Foo();
 ref.method();   //doesnt compile, requires an argument.

 
 This works if the method name in interface B is different from A, Im able to
 call method from interface. Am I doing something wrong? I expected this to
work.
 I'm using dmd 0.160 compile on winxp. Thanks for any help/replies!

The new method in B hides the one in A. With the above modifications it should compile and work. The use of 'alias' here and why it's necessary is explained in (among other places) http://www.digitalmars.com/d/function.html, under "Function Inheritance and Overriding": <quote> However, when doing overload resolution, the functions in the base class are not considered: [...] To consider the base class's functions in the overload resolution process, use an /AliasDeclaration/: [...] </quote>
Jun 13 2006
next sibling parent leoandru <leoandru_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <e6n4rl$kkm$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Frits van Bommel says...
leoandru gmail.com wrote:
 I started coding in D a few days now but I ran into a few problems, I wasn't
 sure if these were bugs so I didnt make a bug report. the problem is with
 interface inheritance and method signatures It doesn't ssem to work as expected
 and I don't see any documentation saying otherwise.
 
 interface A
 {
 void method();
 }
 
 
 interface B : A
 {

alias A.method method;
 void method(int a);
 }
 
 
 class Foo : B
 {

void method() { writefln("method()"); } void method(int a) { writefln("method(", a, ")"); }
 }
 
 

void main() { B ref = new Foo(); ref.method(); ref.method(1); } /*
 B ref = new Foo();
 ref.method();   //doesnt compile, requires an argument.

 
 This works if the method name in interface B is different from A, Im able to
 call method from interface. Am I doing something wrong? I expected this to
work.
 I'm using dmd 0.160 compile on winxp. Thanks for any help/replies!

The new method in B hides the one in A. With the above modifications it should compile and work. The use of 'alias' here and why it's necessary is explained in (among other places) http://www.digitalmars.com/d/function.html, under "Function Inheritance and Overriding": <quote> However, when doing overload resolution, the functions in the base class are not considered: [...] To consider the base class's functions in the overload resolution process, use an /AliasDeclaration/: [...] </quote>

Ok I see then that is just like writing the method signature of Interface A into B. Is that really necessary? at least I expected interfaces to behave the way they do in java or C#. hrm not what I expected, after all interface B is not an override but rather and overloaded version. I wonder what was the reason behind that design decision? Also here is another problem I ran into when using interfaces <code> interface Foo { Object clone(); } class Bar : Foo { Bar clone() { return this; } } void main() { Bar b = new Bar(); Bar c = b.clone(); //works fine Foo f = b; Foo g = f.clone(); //access violation } </code> that one looks like a bug not able to explain whats wrong here, pardon me if im missing something I'm still new to this language. thanks for the replies so far.
Jun 13 2006
prev sibling parent reply leoandru <leoandru_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <e6n4rl$kkm$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Frits van Bommel says...
leoandru gmail.com wrote:
 I started coding in D a few days now but I ran into a few problems, I wasn't
 sure if these were bugs so I didnt make a bug report. the problem is with
 interface inheritance and method signatures It doesn't ssem to work as expected
 and I don't see any documentation saying otherwise.
 
 interface A
 {
 void method();
 }
 
 
 interface B : A
 {

alias A.method method;
 void method(int a);
 }
 
 
 class Foo : B
 {

void method() { writefln("method()"); } void method(int a) { writefln("method(", a, ")"); }
 }
 
 

void main() { B ref = new Foo(); ref.method(); ref.method(1); } /*
 B ref = new Foo();
 ref.method();   //doesnt compile, requires an argument.

 
 This works if the method name in interface B is different from A, Im able to
 call method from interface. Am I doing something wrong? I expected this to
work.
 I'm using dmd 0.160 compile on winxp. Thanks for any help/replies!

The new method in B hides the one in A. With the above modifications it should compile and work. The use of 'alias' here and why it's necessary is explained in (among other places) http://www.digitalmars.com/d/function.html, under "Function Inheritance and Overriding": <quote> However, when doing overload resolution, the functions in the base class are not considered: [...] To consider the base class's functions in the overload resolution process, use an /AliasDeclaration/: [...] </quote>

Ok I see then that is just like writing the method signature of Interface A into B. Is that really necessary? at least I expected interfaces to behave the way they do in java or C#. hrm not what I expected, after all interface B is not an override but rather and overloaded version. I wonder what was the reason behind that design decision? Also here is another problem I ran into when using interfaces <code> interface Foo { Object clone(); } class Bar : Foo { Bar clone() { return this; } } void main() { Bar b = new Bar(); Bar c = b.clone(); //works fine Foo f = b; Foo g = f.clone(); //access violation } </code> that one looks like a bug not able to explain whats wrong here, pardon me if im missing something I'm still new to this language. thanks for the replies so far.
Jun 13 2006
parent reply Max Samuha <maxter i.com.ua_spamless> writes:
On Tue, 13 Jun 2006 21:56:40 +0000 (UTC), leoandru
<leoandru_member pathlink.com> wrote:

<code>
interface Foo
{
Object clone();
}

class Bar : Foo
{
Bar clone()
{
return this; 
}

}

void main()
{
Bar b = new Bar();
Bar c = b.clone(); //works fine

Foo f = b;
Foo g = f.clone(); //access violation

Threre should be a cast to Foo: Foo g = cast(Foo)f.clone(). The code works well for me (WinXP, D 0.160).
}
</code>

Do you get access violation or AssertError? If it's AssertError, you might forget to put 'return' in a function that requirs a value to be returned (int main(...){return 0;}?). D doesn't warn about missing returns at compile time.
Jun 13 2006
parent reply leoandru <leoandru_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <3gav82l5bdkt0logigc3vokptkk35nrkvn 4ax.com>, Max Samuha says...
On Tue, 13 Jun 2006 21:56:40 +0000 (UTC), leoandru
<leoandru_member pathlink.com> wrote:

<code>
interface Foo
{
Object clone();
}

class Bar : Foo
{
Bar clone()
{
return this; 
}

}

void main()
{
Bar b = new Bar();
Bar c = b.clone(); //works fine

Foo f = b;
Foo g = f.clone(); //access violation

Threre should be a cast to Foo: Foo g = cast(Foo)f.clone(). The code works well for me (WinXP, D 0.160).
}
</code>

Do you get access violation or AssertError? If it's AssertError, you might forget to put 'return' in a function that requirs a value to be returned (int main(...){return 0;}?). D doesn't warn about missing returns at compile time.

Yeah I had a return in the affected code in that example I returned a reference to the object itself. gessh! didn't know I had to cast ok thanks! I'll try that then.
Jun 14 2006
parent Max Samuha <maxter i.com.ua_spamless> writes:
On Wed, 14 Jun 2006 15:07:20 +0000 (UTC), leoandru
<leoandru_member pathlink.com> wrote:

In article <3gav82l5bdkt0logigc3vokptkk35nrkvn 4ax.com>, Max Samuha says...
On Tue, 13 Jun 2006 21:56:40 +0000 (UTC), leoandru
<leoandru_member pathlink.com> wrote:

<code>
interface Foo
{
Object clone();
}

class Bar : Foo
{
Bar clone()
{
return this; 
}

}

void main()
{
Bar b = new Bar();
Bar c = b.clone(); //works fine

Foo f = b;
Foo g = f.clone(); //access violation

Threre should be a cast to Foo: Foo g = cast(Foo)f.clone(). The code works well for me (WinXP, D 0.160).
}
</code>

Do you get access violation or AssertError? If it's AssertError, you might forget to put 'return' in a function that requirs a value to be returned (int main(...){return 0;}?). D doesn't warn about missing returns at compile time.

Yeah I had a return in the affected code in that example I returned a reference to the object itself. gessh! didn't know I had to cast ok thanks! I'll try that then.

Sorry, I didn't notice that Bar implements Object clone() as Bar clone(). The return types of the interface method and the method's implementation differ. This seems to be illigal (At least, this is illegal in C#). Anybody knows, why this compiles and works?
Jun 14 2006
prev sibling parent Sjoerd van Leent <svanleent gmail.com> writes:
leoandru gmail.com schreef:
 I started coding in D a few days now but I ran into a few problems, I wasn't
 sure if these were bugs so I didnt make a bug report. the problem is with
 interface inheritance and method signatures It doesn't ssem to work as expected
 and I don't see any documentation saying otherwise.
 
 interface A
 {
 void method();
 }
 
 
 interface B : A
 {
 void method(int a);
 }
 
 
 class Foo : B
 {
 }
 
 
 B ref = new Foo();
 ref.method();   //doesnt compile, requires an argument.
 
 This works if the method name in interface B is different from A, Im able to
 call method from interface. Am I doing something wrong? I expected this to
work.
 I'm using dmd 0.160 compile on winxp. Thanks for any help/replies!
 
 

Well it isn't suppose to compile, this file, since the interface methods need to be implemented anyway. Let's see the problem: module test; interface A { void method(); } interface B : A { void method(int a); } class Foo : B { } void main() { Foo foo = new Foo(); foo.method(); } This generates the problem you where talking about. Let's first implement the contract of interface A: class Foo : B { void method() { int i = 5 + 8; } } Now another error is going to pop up, which is yielding that the method from interface B is not implemented. Exchange it with the contract of interface B, not implementing interface A: class Foo : B { void method(int a) { int i = 5 + a; } } void main() { Foo foo = new Foo(); foo.method(8); } And now we get again that function B.method is not implemented. This is correct behaviour, since interfaces only know about contracts. So interface B, by inheriting interface A makes function A.method also one of the function B.method items. The complete new source: module test; interface A { void method(); } interface B : A{ void method(int a); } class Foo : B { void method() { int i = 5 + 8; } void method(int a) { int i = 5 + a; } } void main() { Foo foo = new Foo(); foo.method(8); foo.method(); } The compiler warning in the beginning has just to do with compile order. Anyway, both methods should be implemented, so that's good. How the compiler implements the order of testing I can't say, this is for Walter to come up with. Regards, Sjoerd
Jun 13 2006