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digitalmars.D - Slogan/catchphrase for D?

reply "Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?

http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

Some particularly bad ones:

1) Write once, debug everywhere
2) Tastes great, less filling.
3) Choosy programmers choose D.
4) C's dead, Jim.
5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
6) Resistance is useless.

Some marginally better ones:

1) Power, Performance, Productivity
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent reply "Lionello Lunesu" <lio remove.lunesu.com> writes:
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

Is it too late to change the name to "P programming language"? L.
Mar 22 2006
parent reply "Rioshin an'Harthen" <rharth75 hotmail.com> writes:
"Lionello Lunesu" <lio remove.lunesu.com> wrote in message 
news:dvr53k$5fq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

Is it too late to change the name to "P programming language"?

Which, by the way, would be the next letter of the "BCPL" language... BCPL -> B -> C
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent reply John Reimer <terminal.node gmail.com> writes:
Rioshin an'Harthen wrote:
 "Lionello Lunesu" <lio remove.lunesu.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvr53k$5fq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity


Which, by the way, would be the next letter of the "BCPL" language... BCPL -> B -> C

And what is L, then? Lisp? We've gone full circle! ;)
Mar 22 2006
parent reply Fredrik Olsson <peylow treyst.se> writes:
John Reimer skrev:
 Rioshin an'Harthen wrote:
 "Lionello Lunesu" <lio remove.lunesu.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvr53k$5fq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity


Which, by the way, would be the next letter of the "BCPL" language... BCPL -> B -> C

And what is L, then? Lisp? We've gone full circle! ;)

Probably, I saw a talk by Alan Kay, he seems bitter, and talk about how the C-family is a dead end that have hindered development for decades. No good ideas here but lets crank out some bad ones that could serve as seeds for good ones. 1. Performance without the price. 2. The simple is simple, the complex is possible. 3. Readable code for computers and humans. 4. Everything useful but sets.
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Julio_C=E9sar_Carrascal_Urquijo?= writes:
Fredrik Olsson wrote:
 4. Everything useful but sets.

ROFL!!!!
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling parent reply Tydr Schnubbis <fake address.dude> writes:
Fredrik Olsson wrote:
 
 1. Performance without the price.

Or how about: 'Speed with Ease' Which should be taken to mean the "speed" of C++ with the "ease" of Java. Or "Have it Both Ways (tm)" ?
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent reply kris <foo bar.com> writes:
Tydr Schnubbis wrote:
 Fredrik Olsson wrote:
 
 1. Performance without the price.

I like that one. Or how about: 'Speed with Ease' Which should be taken to mean the "speed" of C++ with the "ease" of Java. Or "Have it Both Ways (tm)" ?

You mean, like AC-DC?
Mar 22 2006
parent pragma <pragma_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <dvsu5k$2beo$1 digitaldaemon.com>, kris says...
Tydr Schnubbis wrote:
 Fredrik Olsson wrote:
 
 1. Performance without the price.

I like that one. Or how about: 'Speed with Ease' Which should be taken to mean the "speed" of C++ with the "ease" of Java. Or "Have it Both Ways (tm)" ?

You mean, like AC-DC?

Dirty D: Done Dirt Cheap? (Oh, *that* AC-DC... erm.. nevermind) - EricAnderton at yahoo
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling parent =?windows-1252?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Tydr Schnubbis wrote:

 Or how about:
 
 'Speed with Ease'
 
 Which should be taken to mean the "speed" of C++ with the "ease" of Java.

I like this one, if you substitute the C++ for plain old C: The Speed of C with the Ease of Java™. Think I need to do some more complete tests with GCC/GDC/GCJ, to see how far from the real world that statement really is... --anders
Mar 23 2006
prev sibling parent reply kris <foo bar.com> writes:
Rioshin an'Harthen wrote:
 "Lionello Lunesu" <lio remove.lunesu.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvr53k$5fq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
1) Power, Performance, Productivity

Is it too late to change the name to "P programming language"?

Which, by the way, would be the next letter of the "BCPL" language... BCPL -> B -> C

Good point! Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore? I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson? Isn't is considered more effective nowadays to choose a memorable and/or non-geeky primary name? Something like Amber, Wilson, Laguna, or, uhhh, Dude? An alternative would be to combine something retro with something new: perhaps a resurgent pseudo-hip phrase like "get it on!" might work? It's reasonably low key, fun, and works great in conjunction with a name ~ "Get it on, with Amber!" Well, perhaps that combination isn't so great :-p
Mar 22 2006
parent reply "Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a 
 bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent reply pragma <pragma_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <dvs2bl$18bo$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
"kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a 
 bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

How about: D - Work smarter, not harder. ? - EricAnderton at yahoo
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent reply kris <foo bar.com> writes:
pragma wrote:
 In article <dvs2bl$18bo$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
 
"kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...

Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a 
bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.

Or "Dude! Work smarter, not harder" :) Jesting aside; wouldn't it be a good idea to identify the target audience for this kind of message? Is it this group? Perhaps the Hackers noted by Paul Graham? Or management? Java programmers? C# developers? Who? One of the fundamental rules of marketing is to identify (and know) your market. It's also rumoured that engineers make piss-poor marketers ~ too honest and/or pragmatic.
Mar 22 2006
parent John Reimer <terminal.node gmail.com> writes:
kris wrote:
 pragma wrote:
 In article <dvs2bl$18bo$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...

 "kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases 
 are a bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced 
 salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.

Or "Dude! Work smarter, not harder" :) Jesting aside; wouldn't it be a good idea to identify the target audience for this kind of message? Is it this group? Perhaps the Hackers noted by Paul Graham? Or management? Java programmers? C# developers? Who? One of the fundamental rules of marketing is to identify (and know) your market. It's also rumoured that engineers make piss-poor marketers ~ too honest and/or pragmatic.

If we throw enough catch phrases out... maybe we'll capture all markets! < big toothy grin >. Although, I'm curious to know what kind of market "Dude" will attract. What happens when you cross a nerd with a hipster: do you get a game developer? :) I once came across a comic that showed two kids discussing a topic in great earnest, skateboards in hand. It went something like this: kid #1: Dude... kid #2: Dude! kid #1: Dude? kid #2: Duuuuude... kid #1: Duh uuude kid #2: Duu -ude kid #1: dude. kid #2: dude. Translation (can't remember the original so I've taken some license here): kid #1: Greetings, my dear friend... kid #2: Salutations to you, sir! kid #1: Have you made any progress with our prior expatiation of the metaphysical implications of moral order? kid #2: Affirmative, I have deduced that rather than remonstrating a salient conclusion, we have but managed to coalesce a protuberancy of words and meaning: in short, it was a complete tautology. kid #1: I utterly and completely agree -- your perspicuousness in the matter, at least, is indisputable. kid #2: You are most kind; yet my sagacity is but a reflection of your own circumspection. kid #1: I must go now; we shall meet again. kid #2: Most indubitably; adieu to you, sir. :) -JJR
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling parent reply "Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
 ?

It's too vague. Remember the Java one - "write once, run everywhere"? That was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent reply Brad Anderson <brad dsource.dot.org> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 "pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
?

It's too vague. Remember the Java one - "write once, run everywhere"? That was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?

(C++)++
Mar 22 2006
parent =?UTF-8?B?QW5kZXJzIEYgQmrDtnJrbHVuZA==?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Brad Anderson wrote:

 (C++)++

Already taken... (C++)++ = C++++ = C++ = C# = C♯ ++ --anders
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Johan Granberg <lijat.meREM OVEgmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne
 "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood
 "C++ version 2" - <g>
 "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish
 "C++ streamlined" - ? 

How about "Beyond C++"
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne
 "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood
 "C++ version 2" - <g>
 "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish
 "C++ streamlined" - ? 

Isn't it possible to define D without C++ as a comparison ? It seems to always be: better than C++ at this, better than C++ at that, and so on. Just seems like envy, after a while... Other than that, I'm all for a little (justified) C++ bashing. --anders
Mar 22 2006
parent Charles <noone nowhere.com> writes:
 Isn't it possible to define D without C++ as a comparison ?

I agree, some of my freinds were turned off at the mere mention of C++ : "reengineering of C and C++" . Anders F Björklund wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 
 "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne
 "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood
 "C++ version 2" - <g>
 "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar 
 mannish
 "C++ streamlined" - ? 

Isn't it possible to define D without C++ as a comparison ? It seems to always be: better than C++ at this, better than C++ at that, and so on. Just seems like envy, after a while... Other than that, I'm all for a little (justified) C++ bashing. --anders

Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply David L. Davis <SpottedTiger yahoo.com> writes:
In article <dvsboj$1l3m$2 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
"pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
 ?

It's too vague. Remember the Java one - "write once, run everywhere"? That was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?

Here's a few I came up with: ---------------------------- Get more from less code: "Readability, Performability, Maintainability!" (RPMs) D makes the complex...simple. Focus more on the end result, while writing less code to get there. David L. ------------------------------------------------------------------- "Dare to reach for the Stars...Dare to Dream, Build, and Achieve!" ------------------------------------------------------------------- MKoD: http://spottedtiger.tripod.com/D_Language/D_Main_XP.html
Mar 22 2006
parent Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
David L. Davis wrote:
 In article <dvsboj$1l3m$2 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
 "pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
 ?

was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?

Here's a few I came up with: ---------------------------- Get more from less code: "Readability, Performability, Maintainability!" (RPMs) D makes the complex...simple. Focus more on the end result, while writing less code to get there. David L. ------------------------------------------------------------------- "Dare to reach for the Stars...Dare to Dream, Build, and Achieve!" ------------------------------------------------------------------- MKoD: http://spottedtiger.tripod.com/D_Language/D_Main_XP.html

I like this idea. How about this one. :D makes the simple simple, and the complex... simple.
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Charles <noone nowhere.com> writes:
 "C++ - we can rebuild it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar 

LOL! Walter Bright wrote:
 "pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
?

It's too vague. Remember the Java one - "write once, run everywhere"? That was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?

Mar 22 2006
parent Charles <noone nowhere.com> writes:
Maybe lead in with:

The six million dollar language.

Charles wrote:
  > "C++ - we can rebuild it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar 
 mannish
 
 LOL!
 
 Walter Bright wrote:
 
 "pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
 ?

It's too vague. Remember the Java one - "write once, run everywhere"? That was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?


Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 
 "pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
 news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
 ?

It's too vague. Remember the Java one - "write once, run everywhere"? That was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?

D = C + (C++) + Java - (all the crap) or "C++ and Java without all the crap" I hate marketing. ~John Demme
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling parent Dave <Dave_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <dvsboj$1l3m$2 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
"pragma" <pragma_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:dvs65b$1dee$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 How about: D - Work smarter, not harder.
 ?

It's too vague. Remember the Java one - "write once, run everywhere"? That was very effective. Need something like that for D. C++'s catchphrase was originally "C with Classes", and later "A better C." Andrei sent me a list of what pops in his head when he thinks about a language: -------------------- 1. FORTRAN. "First high-level language for scientific computing" 2. LISP. "Lambda. Garbage collection. S-expressions." 3. C. "Portable, efficient assembler. Systems programming" 4. C++. "Multiparadigm" 5. Perl. "Regular expressions. String manipulation." 6. Java. "Virtual Machine (= Write Once, ...). Safety." 7. Smalltalk. "Pure object-oriented." 8. Haskell. "Functional. Type inference." 9. Eiffel. "Contracts." ------------------------- "A better C++" - don't want to copy Bjarne "C++ reloaded" - too hollywood "C++ version 2" - <g> "C++ - we can rebuilt it, we have the technology" - 6 million dollar mannish "C++ streamlined" - ?

"D - Runs Great, Less fiddling"
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Kevin Bealer <Kevin_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <dvs2bl$18bo$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
"kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a 
 bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

'Speed, power, and all the features of C++, Java, and C#, with a lot less code.' Kevin
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply kris <foo bar.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 "kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a 
bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

In terms of print, there's a number of ways to do that. A catch-phrase is one, but requires parsing and semantic analysis (brain time). Catchy names are apparently processed in a related but much less immediately taxing fashion; akin to facial recognition? Even if we don't "get it", there's often enough interest to turn the page back over ~ just like when you see a face you almost recognise, and a whole lot of dedicated effort goes into resolving that ~ sometimes for days <g> An interesting logo, or anything pictorial that stands out from the background (such as a comic strip) are apparently much more noticable than catch-phrases. That's hardly surprising given that our predator eyes excel at isolating 'interest' from vast quantities of background noise. 2 cents p.s. I guess you didn't care much for "Get it on!" and "Amber" then? :)
Mar 22 2006
parent Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
kris wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 "kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases 
 are a bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

In terms of print, there's a number of ways to do that. A catch-phrase is one, but requires parsing and semantic analysis (brain time). Catchy names are apparently processed in a related but much less immediately taxing fashion; akin to facial recognition? Even if we don't "get it", there's often enough interest to turn the page back over ~ just like when you see a face you almost recognise, and a whole lot of dedicated effort goes into resolving that ~ sometimes for days <g> An interesting logo, or anything pictorial that stands out from the background (such as a comic strip) are apparently much more noticable than catch-phrases. That's hardly surprising given that our predator eyes excel at isolating 'interest' from vast quantities of background noise. 2 cents p.s. I guess you didn't care much for "Get it on!" and "Amber" then? :)

So every time we code something with :D (Amber) we are getting it on with a sexy language? lmao.
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 "kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a 
 bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

Do we really care about the type of person that will make a decision about a language in the first 5 seconds they hear of it? Even an executive summary would include more than just a catchprase. Sean
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling parent reply Lucas Goss <lgoss007 gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 "kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases are a 
 bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

I like "D Code", as it has sort of a double meaning. D Code - code in the d programming language D Code - as in decode... "making code as easy as text" or "code in an ordinary language"
Mar 22 2006
parent reply "John S. Skogtvedt" <jss2k2 chello.no> writes:
Lucas Goss wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 
 "kris" <foo bar.com> wrote in message 
 news:dvra93$cdi$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 Not to be a party-pooper, but I got the impression that catchphrases 
 are a bit 80's? Does anyone buy into that type of pitch anymore?
 I mean, when was the last time you swallowed a line like "Power, 
 Performance, Productivity" from an eager and straight-faced salesperson?

That's not a good catchphrase. But when you've got a few seconds to make a first impression before they turn the page, a good one helps.

I like "D Code", as it has sort of a double meaning. D Code - code in the d programming language D Code - as in decode... "making code as easy as text" or "code in an ordinary language"

D - Programming D Coded?
Mar 22 2006
parent Lucas Goss <lgoss007 gmail.com> writes:
John S. Skogtvedt wrote:
 D - Programming D Coded?

Hehe, I like it :)
Mar 23 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply clayasaurus <clayasaurus gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?
 
 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm
 
 Some particularly bad ones:
 
 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.
 
 Some marginally better ones:
 
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity
 
 

A C++ retailored for the new millennium.
Mar 22 2006
parent reply Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
clayasaurus wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would 
 it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

A C++ retailored for the new millennium.

digg--
Mar 22 2006
parent clayasaurus <clayasaurus gmail.com> writes:
Kyle Furlong wrote:
 clayasaurus wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would 
 it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

A C++ retailored for the new millennium.

digg--

--digg--
Mar 23 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply jcc7 <technocrat7 gmail.com> writes:
In article <dvr3n6$2u4$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?

http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

I'm not sure I fully grasp you're looking for, but I'll throw out some ideas. (Don't be too critical guys; I'm just trying to brainstorm.) The power that you want -- the safety that you need Powerful syntax with a blazing-fast compiler Like an ultra-modern C, an enjoyable C++, and a Java without the training wheels -- all rolled into one programming language. The freedom to program effectively and efficiently. Power for productivity but safety to prevent bugs (I think this is long and awkward, but there's a good idea in there trying to escape). jcc7
Mar 22 2006
parent Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
jcc7 wrote:
 In article <dvr3n6$2u4$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

I'm not sure I fully grasp you're looking for, but I'll throw out some ideas. (Don't be too critical guys; I'm just trying to brainstorm.) The power that you want -- the safety that you need Powerful syntax with a blazing-fast compiler Like an ultra-modern C, an enjoyable C++, and a Java without the training wheels -- all rolled into one programming language. The freedom to program effectively and efficiently.

I like this one.
 Power for productivity but safety to prevent bugs (I think this is long and
 awkward, but there's a good idea in there trying to escape).
 
 jcc7

Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply John Reimer <terminal.node gmail.com> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?
 
 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm
 
 Some particularly bad ones:
 
 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.
 
 Some marginally better ones:
 
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity
 
 

* Draconian C++ to Calisthenic D. Or is that too confrontational? :) -JJR
Mar 22 2006
parent reply Charles <noone nowhere.com> writes:
 * Draconian C++ to Calisthenic D.

Hehe I like it, maybe even more confrontational like D , what C++ should have been . D , because C++ sucks. D , its not your fathers programming language. D , kicking your ass all over this mo fo! John Reimer wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would 
 it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

* Draconian C++ to Calisthenic D. Or is that too confrontational? :) -JJR

Mar 22 2006
parent "Chris Miller" <chris dprogramming.com> writes:
On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 15:22:16 -0500, Charles <noone nowhere.com> wrote:

  > * Draconian C++ to Calisthenic D.

 Hehe I like it, maybe even more confrontational like

 D , what C++ should have been .
 D , because C++ sucks.
 D , its not your fathers programming language.
 D , kicking your ass all over this mo fo!

Yes, I like "D, what C++ should have been.". If the slogan includes "C++" at all, I don't want it suggesting C++ is any good.
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply =?iso-8859-1?q?Knud_S=F8rensen?= <12tkvvb02 sneakemail.com> writes:
Here some from me.


1) The best D you will ever get in programming. 
(yea, like the one on the D page) 
2) Write once and unit test everything.
3) With D you don't need a debugger.  
(That's when Walter add null ref. check and/or call log)
4) D the fastest way to fast code.
5) Real men/programmers know how to do D.
6) Get D !/?
7) It is programming but not as we know it. 
8) Basic safety and FORTRAN speed.


On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 01:00:18 -0800, Walter Bright wrote:

 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?
 
 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm
 
 Some particularly bad ones:
 
 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.
 
 Some marginally better ones:
 
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent clayasaurus <clayasaurus gmail.com> writes:
Knud Sørensen wrote:
 Here some from me.

 4) D the fastest way to fast code.

/me likes
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Charles <noone nowhere.com> writes:
 4) D the fastest way to fast code.

This ones actually pretty cool. Knud Sørensen wrote:
 Here some from me.
 
 
 1) The best D you will ever get in programming. 
 (yea, like the one on the D page) 
 2) Write once and unit test everything.
 3) With D you don't need a debugger.  
 (That's when Walter add null ref. check and/or call log)
 4) D the fastest way to fast code.
 5) Real men/programmers know how to do D.
 6) Get D !/?
 7) It is programming but not as we know it. 
 8) Basic safety and FORTRAN speed.
 
 
 On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 01:00:18 -0800, Walter Bright wrote:
 
 
If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?

http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

Some particularly bad ones:

1) Write once, debug everywhere
2) Tastes great, less filling.
3) Choosy programmers choose D.
4) C's dead, Jim.
5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
6) Resistance is useless.

Some marginally better ones:

1) Power, Performance, Productivity


Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Julio_C=E9sar_Carrascal_Urquijo?= writes:
Knud Sørensen wrote:
 7) It is programming but not as we know it. 

I really like this, maybe like this: D: Programming, but not as we know it. http://www.digitalmars.com/
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Knud Sørensen wrote:
 Here some from me.
 
 
 1) The best D you will ever get in programming. 
 (yea, like the one on the D page) 
 2) Write once and unit test everything.
 3) With D you don't need a debugger.  
 (That's when Walter add null ref. check and/or call log)
 4) D the fastest way to fast code.
 5) Real men/programmers know how to do D.
 6) Get D !/?
 7) It is programming but not as we know it. 
 8) Basic safety and FORTRAN speed.
 
 
 On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 01:00:18 -0800, Walter Bright wrote:
 
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity


D. The fastest way to the fastest code. Period. This is the winner in my book.
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling parent reply =?iso-8859-1?q?Knud_S=F8rensen?= <12tkvvb02 sneakemail.com> writes:
 4) D the fastest way to fast code.

Here is some variations. a) D the fast way to fast code. b) D the fastest way to fast code. c) D the fast way to the fastest code. d) D the fastest way to the fastest code. I think I like a) best. I all cases it does describe the fact that. A D compiler is fast to implement. D is high level so it is fast to develop programs. D compiles really fast. D make really fast code. And D helps you debug you programs fast. So, I think it is a very good catchphrase. Knud
Mar 24 2006
parent tjohnson [at] prtsoftware.com <tjohnson_member pathlink.com> writes:
How about:

:D The fun way to write fast code.
:D The funnest way to write fast code.

Tom J


In article <pan.2006.03.24.19.46.49.355998 sneakemail.com>,
=?iso-8859-1?q?Knud_S=F8rensen?= says...
 4) D the fastest way to fast code.

Here is some variations. a) D the fast way to fast code. b) D the fastest way to fast code. c) D the fast way to the fastest code. d) D the fastest way to the fastest code. I think I like a) best. I all cases it does describe the fact that. A D compiler is fast to implement. D is high level so it is fast to develop programs. D compiles really fast. D make really fast code. And D helps you debug you programs fast. So, I think it is a very good catchphrase. Knud

Mar 24 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Alexander Panek <alexander.panek brainsware.org> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?
 
 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm
 
 Some particularly bad ones:
 
 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.
 
 Some marginally better ones:
 
 1) Power, Performance, Productivity
 
 

"With D you can get everywhere you want to be." - with a woman's chest in the background wearing a bra consisting of two 'D's -- sex sells. :D Regards, Alex
Mar 22 2006
parent reply Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Alexander Panek wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would 
 it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

"With D you can get everywhere you want to be." - with a woman's chest in the background wearing a bra consisting of two 'D's -- sex sells. :D Regards, Alex

D. Because bigger is better. :-D :-D :-D
Mar 22 2006
next sibling parent Alexander Panek <alexander.panek brainsware.org> writes:
Kyle Furlong wrote:
 Alexander Panek wrote:
 
 Walter Bright wrote:

 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would 
 it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

"With D you can get everywhere you want to be." - with a woman's chest in the background wearing a bra consisting of two 'D's -- sex sells. :D Regards, Alex

D. Because bigger is better. :-D :-D :-D

LOL - that one is great too, hah!
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent =?iso-8859-1?q?Knud_S=F8rensen?= <12tkvvb02 sneakemail.com> writes:
On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 16:03:28 -0800, Kyle Furlong wrote:

 Alexander Panek wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would 
 it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

"With D you can get everywhere you want to be." - with a woman's chest in the background wearing a bra consisting of two 'D's -- sex sells. :D Regards, Alex

D. Because bigger is better. :-D :-D :-D

What about. D. Because speed matters.
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling parent Kevin Bealer <Kevin_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <dvsoo6$23r8$9 digitaldaemon.com>, Kyle Furlong says...
Alexander Panek wrote:
 Walter Bright wrote:
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would 
 it be?

 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

 Some particularly bad ones:

 1) Write once, debug everywhere
 2) Tastes great, less filling.
 3) Choosy programmers choose D.
 4) C's dead, Jim.
 5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
 6) Resistance is useless.

 Some marginally better ones:

 1) Power, Performance, Productivity

"With D you can get everywhere you want to be." - with a woman's chest in the background wearing a bra consisting of two 'D's -- sex sells. :D Regards, Alex

D. Because bigger is better. :-D :-D :-D

Yes, but java projects are all named for coffees. With your suggestion we would have to use names for big round things, like... Mango? Uh, never mind. Kevin
Mar 22 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Wolfgang Draxinger <wdraxinger darkstargames.de> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:

 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what
 would it be?

It's like C++, just better.
 4) C's dead, Jim.

Come on, pure C isn't a bad language, especially if one has to go real low level and the applications requires the programmer to do everything himself. I'm thinking of microcontroller applications and stuff. Oftenly I also do larger uC projects (up to 32k of binary size) completely in assembler. -- Wolfgang Draxinger
Mar 23 2006
parent reply "Walter Bright" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"Wolfgang Draxinger" <wdraxinger darkstargames.de> wrote in message 
news:dvu1pr$rpl$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Walter Bright wrote:

 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what
 would it be?

It's like C++, just better.
 4) C's dead, Jim.

Come on, pure C isn't a bad language,

Et tu, D? Then fall, C! -- Julius C
Mar 23 2006
next sibling parent reply Sean Kelly <sean f4.ca> writes:
Walter Bright wrote:
 "Wolfgang Draxinger" <wdraxinger darkstargames.de> wrote in message 
 news:dvu1pr$rpl$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Walter Bright wrote:

 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what
 would it be?

 4) C's dead, Jim.

Come on, pure C isn't a bad language,

Et tu, D? Then fall, C! -- Julius C

I couldn't resist: "A D by any other name would smell as sweet?" "What a piece of work is D! How noble in design! how infinite in flexibility!" "Elegance, thy name is D!" "The code's to C wherein you'll find the elegance of D." "The better part of D is (garbage) collection." "But, for my own part, it was C to me." "My Java days, when I was green in judgment." "Out of the jaws of C." "This D's a razor to my shoddy code." "The course of fast code never did run in a VM." And some Milton for fun: "Things unattempted yet in code or script." "To code C++ is miserable, doing or suffering." "Who casts by force, hath overcome but half his code." Sean
Mar 23 2006
parent reply Dave <Dave_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <dvv6cq$2bq4$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Sean Kelly says...
Walter Bright wrote:
 "Wolfgang Draxinger" <wdraxinger darkstargames.de> wrote in message 
 news:dvu1pr$rpl$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Walter Bright wrote:

 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what
 would it be?

 4) C's dead, Jim.

Come on, pure C isn't a bad language,

Et tu, D? Then fall, C! -- Julius C

I couldn't resist: "A D by any other name would smell as sweet?" "What a piece of work is D! How noble in design! how infinite in flexibility!" "Elegance, thy name is D!" "The code's to C wherein you'll find the elegance of D." "The better part of D is (garbage) collection." "But, for my own part, it was C to me." "My Java days, when I was green in judgment." "Out of the jaws of C." "This D's a razor to my shoddy code." "The course of fast code never did run in a VM." And some Milton for fun: "Things unattempted yet in code or script." "To code C++ is miserable, doing or suffering." "Who casts by force, hath overcome but half his code." Sean

My favorite: D: "GIT-R-DONE" :)
Mar 23 2006
parent lanael <lanael_member pathlink.com> writes:
My two favorite ones :

John S. Skogtvedt wrote:
"> D - Programming D Coded?"

"D : the fastest way to fast code."

and one from me :

"D : got milk ?"  :)
Mar 24 2006
prev sibling parent David L. Davis <SpottedTiger yahoo.com> writes:
D : "Modern, Powerful, and Sleek."

-------------------------------------------------------------------
 "Dare to reach for the Stars...Dare to Dream, Build, and Achieve!"
-------------------------------------------------------------------
  
 MKoD: http://spottedtiger.tripod.com/D_Language/D_Main_XP.html
Mar 24 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Nick <Nick_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <dvr3n6$2u4$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?

http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

Well, what are the key positive points you would like to express? What makes D special? After reading through this thread, I'd have to say the best suggestions so far are - "The fastest way to fast code", and - "Speed with ease", perhaps somehow in combination with "Have it both ways". Eg. "Fast and easy - have it both ways" The key words here are speed/fast and easy (I don't like 'simple' since it has other negative connotations, ie. unsophisticated.) The phrase should probably be built around those words/ideas. It also is not a bad idea to have some reference to the programming world, words like "code", "write", "run" to make the phrase look less generic, but it's not mandatory. Some other suggestions: - Don't refer to C++ or Java - never a good idea to refer to your competitor, it looks like the only argument you've got is "At least we're better than THEM." - Don't use words like "bug" or "debug", they are _negative_ words. Instead use positive words, like "safe" or "secure". - Avoid jokes and play on words like "D-code" or "D-licious", unless you can make it look really good. - Keep it short and snappy, no two-sentance catch phrases. Catch phrases (and other marketing gimmicks) are sort of like the feathers on a peacock. They don't really serve a purpose, they are mostly signals companies use to say "Yes, I'm big and powerful enough to hire a competent marketing firm. Pick me." IMO the most important quality of a good catch phrase is that it doesn't look goofy. If it looks like something a 14-year old made up, people will think the same of the whole D language. This doesn't mean one can use all kinds of silly/funny phrases to market D, but the one "official" catch phrase should look professional.
Some particularly bad ones:

1) Write once, debug everywhere
2) Tastes great, less filling.
3) Choosy programmers choose D.
4) C's dead, Jim.
5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
6) Resistance is useless.

Yes, these are really bad :-)
1) Power, Performance, Productivity

Can you say boooring? Nick
Mar 24 2006
parent Georg Wrede <georg.wrede nospam.org> writes:
Nick wrote:
 Walter Bright says...
 
 If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what
 would it be?
 
 http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

Well, what are the key positive points you would like to express? What makes D special? After reading through this thread, I'd have to say the best suggestions so far are - "The fastest way to fast code", and - "Speed with ease", perhaps somehow in combination with "Have it both ways". Eg. "Fast and easy - have it both ways" The key words here are speed/fast and easy (I don't like 'simple' since it has other negative connotations, ie. unsophisticated.) The phrase should probably be built around those words/ideas. It also is not a bad idea to have some reference to the programming world, words like "code", "write", "run" to make the phrase look less generic, but it's not mandatory. Some other suggestions: - Don't refer to C++ or Java - never a good idea to refer to your competitor, it looks like the only argument you've got is "At least we're better than THEM." - Don't use words like "bug" or "debug", they are _negative_ words. Instead use positive words, like "safe" or "secure". - Avoid jokes and play on words like "D-code" or "D-licious", unless you can make it look really good. - Keep it short and snappy, no two-sentance catch phrases. Catch phrases (and other marketing gimmicks) are sort of like the feathers on a peacock. They don't really serve a purpose, they are mostly signals companies use to say "Yes, I'm big and powerful enough to hire a competent marketing firm. Pick me." IMO the most important quality of a good catch phrase is that it doesn't look goofy. If it looks like something a 14-year old made up, people will think the same of the whole D language. This doesn't mean one can use all kinds of silly/funny phrases to market D, but the one "official" catch phrase should look professional.

How true. And the more we avoid putting off all those to whom the catch phrase doesn't resonate, the better. D, simply the next language.
Mar 24 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent Frank Benoit <frank nix.de> writes:
	native delight
Mar 24 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Andrew Fedoniouk" <news terrainformatica.com> writes:
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset="koi8-r"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

E =3D mD2
Mar 24 2006
next sibling parent Georg Wrede <georg.wrede nospam.org> writes:
Andrew Fedoniouk wrote:
 E = m*D*^2

I'd be amazed if this didn't show up on Think Geek T-shirts.
Mar 24 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Kyle Furlong <kylefurlong gmail.com> writes:
Andrew Fedoniouk wrote:
 E = m*D*^2

So what is the implication here? Is D a larger constant than C? So we get more E for our m? I'm confused as to how this relates. (I am a physicist so sorry for the nit pick)
Mar 24 2006
parent "Andrew Fedoniouk" <news terrainformatica.com> writes:
"Kyle Furlong" <kylefurlong gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:e01lqg$2ukp$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Andrew Fedoniouk wrote:
 E = m*D*^2

So what is the implication here? Is D a larger constant than C? So we get more E for our m? I'm confused as to how this relates. (I am a physicist so sorry for the nit pick)

OT: Well, I am a physicist too. (MS in Physics and Applied Mathematics if it interesting to someone) The idea that D has speed of light (or even more :-). And mutliplied by m, some good *m*an's effort if you wish, can produce a lot of energy thus power. Huh?
Mar 24 2006
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Alexander Panek <alexander.panek brainsware.org> writes:
Andrew Fedoniouk wrote:
 E = m*D*^2

I vote on that. It's ingenius. Regards, Alex
Mar 24 2006
parent F <F_member pathlink.com> writes:
+1 but, also: "Just D it!"


In article <e02r3c$1m3a$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Alexander Panek says...
Andrew Fedoniouk wrote:
 E = m*D*^2

I vote on that. It's ingenius. Regards, Alex

Mar 25 2006
prev sibling parent Nils Hensel <nils.hensel web.de> writes:
Andrew Fedoniouk schrieb:
 E = m*D*^2

I like that. Neat and nerdy ;) Nils
Mar 25 2006
prev sibling parent ts4short gmail.com writes:
In article <dvr3n6$2u4$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter Bright says...
If you could  sum up the essence of D in a "high concept", what would it be?

http://www.themegahitmovies.com/highconcept.htm

Some particularly bad ones:

1) Write once, debug everywhere
2) Tastes great, less filling.
3) Choosy programmers choose D.
4) C's dead, Jim.
5) So sophisticated, even we don't understand it.
6) Resistance is useless.

Some marginally better ones:

1) Power, Performance, Productivity

Here's one for the books: (D)ynamite - explosive power in a portable package! "Here comes the BOOM!!!" Todd Shirk
Mar 24 2006