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digitalmars.D - embedding D in html: practical?

reply Ben Hinkle <Ben_member pathlink.com> writes:
I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code in html
and if so what are the benefits and problems?
It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a file or
two.
Aug 14 2005
next sibling parent reply "Jarrett Billingsley" <kb3ctd2 yahoo.com> writes:
"Ben Hinkle" <Ben_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code in 
 html
 and if so what are the benefits and problems?
 It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
 practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a file 
 or
 two.

I think it'd open up some interesting possibilities for IDEs. It'd be like combining the code with the docs - you could insert formatting, images, etc. interspersed with the code for docs.
Aug 14 2005
next sibling parent reply jmjmak utu.invalid.fi writes:
In article <ddo22b$2b1d$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Jarrett Billingsley says...
"Ben Hinkle" <Ben_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code in 
 html
 and if so what are the benefits and problems?
 It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
 practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a file 
 or
 two.

I think it'd open up some interesting possibilities for IDEs. It'd be like combining the code with the docs - you could insert formatting, images, etc. interspersed with the code for docs.

On other hand, all this can be done automatically with tools like doxygen. I think there are some good things about html support. For example, it's very easy to test tutorial code found online by just compiling the web file. Still I don't think major projects should use this feature. It becomes quite cumbersome with bigger files. Jari-Matti
Aug 14 2005
next sibling parent "Ben Hinkle" <ben.hinkle gmail.com> writes:
<jmjmak utu.invalid.fi> wrote in message 
news:ddo2ir$2bbh$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In article <ddo22b$2b1d$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Jarrett Billingsley says...
"Ben Hinkle" <Ben_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code 
 in
 html
 and if so what are the benefits and problems?
 It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
 practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a 
 file
 or
 two.

I think it'd open up some interesting possibilities for IDEs. It'd be like combining the code with the docs - you could insert formatting, images, etc. interspersed with the code for docs.

On other hand, all this can be done automatically with tools like doxygen. I think there are some good things about html support. For example, it's very easy to test tutorial code found online by just compiling the web file. Still I don't think major projects should use this feature. It becomes quite cumbersome with bigger files. Jari-Matti

That's an interesting idea - runnable tutorial pages. We should try setting some up. In particular it would be nice if the D spec itself was runnable (I don't count the html page that explains how you can embed D in html as enough). D could be one of the first languages to be able to run its own spec :-) I'll give a shot at making the MinTL web page runnable - though still people will have to download and install the library specially.
Aug 14 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Vathix <chris dprogramming.com> writes:
 it's very easy
 to test tutorial code found online by just compiling the web file. Still  
 I don't
 think major projects should use this feature. It becomes quite  
 cumbersome with
 bigger files.

That is also my view of this. With most of the D code I post on web pages I use this feature.
Aug 14 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Ben Hinkle" <ben.hinkle gmail.com> writes:
I've been converting the examples in 
http://home.comcast.net/~benhinkle/mintl/index.html to use this embedded 
html stuff and it works fine but I have one small issue. When I put the 
hidden code in HTML comments dmd can't find it. Is there an easy way to 
prevent some non-comment HTML from rendering in browsers?
The reason I want to hide some code is that each example in the document is 
a code fragment and I have these ugly code blocks that wrap the fragments 
into a main():
<code>
  int main() {
</code>
... rest of document ...
<code>
  return 0; }
</code>
Writing text in the help to explain what those wacky code blocks are doing 
is ugly so I'd like to hide them from the user.


<jmjmak utu.invalid.fi> wrote in message 
news:ddo2ir$2bbh$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In article <ddo22b$2b1d$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Jarrett Billingsley says...
"Ben Hinkle" <Ben_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code 
 in
 html
 and if so what are the benefits and problems?
 It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
 practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a 
 file
 or
 two.

I think it'd open up some interesting possibilities for IDEs. It'd be like combining the code with the docs - you could insert formatting, images, etc. interspersed with the code for docs.

On other hand, all this can be done automatically with tools like doxygen. I think there are some good things about html support. For example, it's very easy to test tutorial code found online by just compiling the web file. Still I don't think major projects should use this feature. It becomes quite cumbersome with bigger files. Jari-Matti

Aug 14 2005
next sibling parent reply Dejan Lekic <leka entropy.tmok.com> writes:
Mr. Hinkle,
I am one of those guys who like clean code. Don't You think having code
inside bunch of HTML tags will just make a mess? I would personally avoid
it. I do not even put huge comments before methods just because of this
reason - I usually comment code separately inside per-class xhtml file.

-- 
...........
Dejan Lekic
  http://dejan.lekic.org
  
Aug 14 2005
parent "Ben Hinkle" <ben.hinkle gmail.com> writes:
"Dejan Lekic" <leka entropy.tmok.com> wrote in message 
news:ddoori$2qaq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Mr. Hinkle,
 I am one of those guys who like clean code. Don't You think having code
 inside bunch of HTML tags will just make a mess? I would personally avoid
 it. I do not even put huge comments before methods just because of this
 reason - I usually comment code separately inside per-class xhtml file.

 -- 
 ...........
 Dejan Lekic
  http://dejan.lekic.org

You misunderstand my intention. I agree writing the primary code in html is silly. The file I'm talking about is the documentation for the package that has 4 or 5 line fragments of examples. These examples are the things that would be nice to put inside <code> blocks so that the doc file itself can be fed to dmd and run. The ratio of text to code is probably about 10 lines of text for every line of code. I don't understand the comment about xhtml - What comments and methods and classes are you referring to? Can you point me at an example web page?
Aug 14 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent =?UTF-8?B?VGhvbWFzIEvDvGhuZQ==?= writes:
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Ben Hinkle schrieb:

 I've been converting the examples in 
 http://home.comcast.net/~benhinkle/mintl/index.html to use this embedded 
 html stuff and it works fine but I have one small issue. When I put the 
 hidden code in HTML comments dmd can't find it. Is there an easy way to 
 prevent some non-comment HTML from rendering in browsers?
 The reason I want to hide some code is that each example in the document is 
 a code fragment and I have these ugly code blocks that wrap the fragments 
 into a main():
 <code>
   int main() {
 </code>
 .... rest of document ...
 <code>
   return 0; }
 </code>
 Writing text in the help to explain what those wacky code blocks are doing 
 is ugly so I'd like to hide them from the user.

<html> <head> <style type="text/css"> <!-- .hidden { display:none;visibility:inline; }; --> </style> </head> <body> <code class="hidden"> private import std.stdio; int main() { </code> <p>some documentation</p> <code> writef("Hello World!"); </code> <p>other comments</p> <code class="hidden"> return 0; } </code> </body> </html> Thomas -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- iD8DBQFDADuc3w+/yD4P9tIRAjVlAJ4/5XBfbWmu+rvdqtbHFn0I+h73agCfWr5x fs0l/Z8dkp4QEcS8yqqozXM= =ziQK -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
Aug 14 2005
prev sibling parent Daniel Keep <daniel.keep dummy.gmail.com> writes:
Ben Hinkle wrote:
 I've been converting the examples in 
 http://home.comcast.net/~benhinkle/mintl/index.html to use this embedded 
 html stuff and it works fine but I have one small issue. When I put the 
 hidden code in HTML comments dmd can't find it. Is there an easy way to 
 prevent some non-comment HTML from rendering in browsers?
 The reason I want to hide some code is that each example in the document is 
 a code fragment and I have these ugly code blocks that wrap the fragments 
 into a main():
 <code>
   int main() {
 </code>
 .... rest of document ...
 <code>
   return 0; }
 </code>
 Writing text in the help to explain what those wacky code blocks are doing 
 is ugly so I'd like to hide them from the user.

<style type="text/css"> .hidden { display: none; } </style> <!-- ... --> <code class="hidden"> int main() { </code> .... rest of document ... <code class="hidden"> return 0; } </code>
 
 
 <jmjmak utu.invalid.fi> wrote in message 
 news:ddo2ir$2bbh$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
In article <ddo22b$2b1d$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Jarrett Billingsley says...

"Ben Hinkle" <Ben_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com...

I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code 
in
html
and if so what are the benefits and problems?
It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a 
file
or
two.

I think it'd open up some interesting possibilities for IDEs. It'd be like combining the code with the docs - you could insert formatting, images, etc. interspersed with the code for docs.

On other hand, all this can be done automatically with tools like doxygen. I think there are some good things about html support. For example, it's very easy to test tutorial code found online by just compiling the web file. Still I don't think major projects should use this feature. It becomes quite cumbersome with bigger files. Jari-Matti


-- v1sw5+8Yhw5ln4+5pr6OFma8u6+7Lw4Tm6+7l6+7D a2Xs3MSr2e4/6+7t4TNSMb6HTOp5en5g6RAHCP http://hackerkey.com/
Aug 26 2005
prev sibling parent reply janderson <askme me.com> writes:
Jarrett Billingsley wrote:
 "Ben Hinkle" <Ben_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code in 
 html
 and if so what are the benefits and problems?
 It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
 practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a file 
 or
 two.

I think it'd open up some interesting possibilities for IDEs. It'd be like combining the code with the docs - you could insert formatting, images, etc. interspersed with the code for docs.

I would like this as well. I did some research to try and find a free HTML control that allows you to edit it. However the only free one seems to be part of the explorer it self (mozzila and iexplore has one). It would be great to be able to see images and such while your reading the code. You could highlight parts of importance, put things under headers ect... Upload it to the Internet. -Joel
Feb 02 2007
parent reply janderson <askme me.com> writes:
janderson wrote:
 Jarrett Billingsley wrote:
 "Ben Hinkle" <Ben_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
 news:ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D 
 code in html
 and if so what are the benefits and problems?
 It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
 practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a 
 file or
 two.

I think it'd open up some interesting possibilities for IDEs. It'd be like combining the code with the docs - you could insert formatting, images, etc. interspersed with the code for docs.

I would like this as well. I did some research to try and find a free HTML control that allows you to edit it. However the only free one seems to be part of the explorer it self (mozzila and iexplore has one).

By HTML control I mean one that allows you to edit like a word doc. It would be highly impractical to code in straight HTML or XML.
 
 It would be great to be able to see images and such while your reading 
 the code.  You could highlight parts of importance, put things under 
 headers ect...  Upload it to the Internet.
 
 -Joel

Feb 02 2007
parent reply Stewart Gordon <smjg_1998 yahoo.com> writes:
janderson Wrote:

<snip>
 By HTML control I mean one that allows you to edit like a word 
 doc.  It would be highly impractical to code in straight HTML 
 or XML.

Like a word doc? If you're writing source code, you want it to be more like editing a plain text file, don't you? Unless you want to do the syntax highlighting manually. Writing the code, and then doing a search and replace to convert '&', '<' and '>' to their HTML equivalents doesn't strike me as impractical. Only when you want to do syntax highlighting does hand-coding begin to be cumbersome IMO. And even then, I can see some text editors having enough regexp power to lighten the load. TextPad has a "Copy as HTML" feature, and it makes it easy to add syntax highlighting using CSS. A few words of warning though: - TextPad is a commercial product - though it is fully functional TBYB (its creators don't use the word "shareware"....) - it isn't unicode conformant - it doesn't support D's nested comments or WYSIWYG strings - you'll have to manually add the <code> </code> tags afterwards - you might have to switch off word wrap, particularly if you have it set to break lines on save Stewart.
Feb 03 2007
parent reply janderson <askme me.com> writes:
Stewart Gordon wrote:
 janderson Wrote:
 
 <snip>
 By HTML control I mean one that allows you to edit like a word 
 doc.  It would be highly impractical to code in straight HTML 
 or XML.

Like a word doc? If you're writing source code, you want it to be more like editing a plain text file, don't you? Unless you want to do the syntax highlighting manually.

I'd imagine if you had a control that you could make into your own editor, syntax hightlighting would be automatic. You could probably override it if necessary.
 Writing the code, and then doing a search and replace to convert '&', '<' and
'>' to their HTML equivalents doesn't strike me as impractical.  Only when you
want to do syntax highlighting does hand-coding begin to be cumbersome IMO. 
And even then, I can see some text editors having enough regexp power to
lighten the load.


highlighting) its yet area for potential syntax bugs. You've also got more syntax to read and debug. The whole point is readability, I'm never going to look at code in html viewer, so why have all the ugly '<' and '>' and use my imagination to see the pictures and lines are.
 TextPad has a "Copy as HTML" feature, and it makes it easy to add syntax
highlighting using CSS.  A few words of warning though:
 - TextPad is a commercial product - though it is fully functional TBYB (its
creators don't use the word "shareware"....)
 - it isn't unicode conformant
 - it doesn't support D's nested comments or WYSIWYG strings

What's the point then?
 - you'll have to manually add the <code> </code> tags afterwards
 - you might have to switch off word wrap, particularly if you have it set to
break lines on save
 

I checked out TextPad. It doesn't provide WYSIWYG strings, its not a control which I could fashion into my own editor (that provides context sensitivity ect..). I might as well use scintilla (which is a control). The main point of what I was taking about was WYSIWYG strings and images. I've a feeling that the control I want just doesn't exist. Thanks for your time.
 Stewart.

Feb 03 2007
parent Thomas Kuehne <thomas-dloop kuehne.cn> writes:
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Hash: SHA1

janderson schrieb am 2007-02-04:
 Stewart Gordon wrote:
 janderson Wrote:


 Writing the code, and then doing a search and replace to convert '&',
 '<' and '>' to their HTML equivalents doesn't strike me as impractical.
 Only when you want to do syntax highlighting does hand-coding begin to
 be cumbersome IMO.  And even then, I can see some text editors having
 enough regexp power to lighten the load.


highlighting) its yet area for potential syntax bugs. You've also got more syntax to read and debug. The whole point is readability, I'm never going to look at code in html viewer, so why have all the ugly '<' and '>' and use my imagination to see the pictures and lines are.

For nice source code use the XHTML template below: 1 : <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> 2 : <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" 3 : "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> 4 : <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" lang="en"> 5 : <head><title>XHTML Example</title></head> 6 : <body><pre><code><![CDATA[ 7 : if(x < 0 || "<a>b" != y) .... 8 : ]]></code></pre></body> 9 : </html> Some browsers require the file ending "xhtml" instead of "html". Thomas -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- iD8DBQFFxUALLK5blCcjpWoRAhH2AJ4yN8oSlGUuZHbsmKw5O/h60ZgOUgCeMQmM FfCyZakoJZXT5gT+Fj3hzVI= =P86C -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
Feb 03 2007
prev sibling parent pragma <pragma_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <ddnq6a$255k$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Ben Hinkle says...
I'm curious if anyone has been using the D feature of embedding D code in html
and if so what are the benefits and problems?
It seems to me like a neat idea that hasn't panned out - it doesn't seem
practical. Then again I haven't used it except playing around with a file or
two.

I'm in the same boat, I've given it a few tries. It does seem like a cool way to document your code, but it falls short of its original purpose. Maybe its a bit nitpicky but the lack of an alternate extension, hurts when you're trying to groom your filesystem. Ideally, it should be something that says "I'm sourcecode embedded in markup" rather than "I'm a webpage, no, really." Extensions like "htmld" or "xmld" come to mind ("dhtml" is a bad idea for obvious reasons). Seeing a folder full of "html" files just looks too much like one of my web projects. Alternatively, If I could kick the parser into markup mode at will, (say via a pragma), that would be nice too. Now, I suppose one were to think outside the box, and treat these files not as HTML but XML files (data, not presentation), you could really take it somewhere. # <method> # <description>This is my hello world method</description> # <code> # void foobar(){ writefln("hello world"); } # </code> # </method> Now *that's* a little more useful. - EricAnderton at yahoo
Aug 14 2005