www.digitalmars.com         C & C++   DMDScript  

digitalmars.D - What do you use D for?

reply zwang <nehzgnaw gmail.com> writes:
I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a 
few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.
Jun 23 2005
next sibling parent Tom S <h3r3tic remove.mat.uni.torun.pl> writes:
zwang wrote:
 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only 
 a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
 projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I'm coding a 3D game/engine with more than few thousand lines of code. It will probably also branch off into a commercial visualization program :) -- Tomasz Stachowiak /+ a.k.a. h3r3tic +/
Jun 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Stewart Gordon <smjg_1998 yahoo.com> writes:
zwang wrote:
 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only 
 a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
 projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I've used it for a variety of purposes. Mainly toy projects for now, but hopefully in the not-too-distant future I'll have some stuff worthy of releasing not just as SDWF demos. Stewart. -- My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Jun 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent pragma <pragma_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <d9ej3v$2hpb$1 digitaldaemon.com>, zwang says...
I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a 
few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

Here's what I'm working on: DSP - Server-side dyanmic servlet generation (Dynamic Servlet Pages). Simliar to ColdFusion or PHP, DSP provides a tag syntax plus embedded D code, that renders your servlet script as compiled D on the server. http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsp Watcher (new) - FTP Syncronization Utility. Sychronizes an arbitrary directory with an FTP account in real-time, as the local filesystem changes. (A great time-saver for web development) http://www.dsource.org/projects/watcher Both of these are Beta FOSS projects, and I take them quite seriously. DSP has oodles of commercial potential for obvious reasons (no language interpreter or VM). Watcher may well be destined to the average webdev toolbox; not a direct commercial impact, but its already saved me *tons* of time developing web sites. Stuff that's on the back burner: - An XML library with XMLNS, DOM3 and XPATH support (the parser is a part of DSP right now). - D to XML converter, suitable for doc generation (a modified DMDFE project). Also, since Kris is on vacation, I'll plug in Mango for him. I use Mango for both of the above projects. It is far-and-away, the highest quality D library available today. It certainly is a commercial-grade product. Mango - Primarily an I/O library, Mango makes all kinds of tasks easy in D: client-server, TCP/IP, streams (conduits), file system manipulation, Unicode, XML, its all there. Documentation and examples are available. http://www.dsource.org/projects/mango I'm sure Kris has other stuff he's working on too. ;) - EricAnderton at yahoo
Jun 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent clayasaurus <clayasaurus gmail.com> writes:
zwang wrote:
 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only 
 a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
 projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

As a better hobby language http://svn.dsource.org/projects/warbots/web/index.html
Jun 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Trevor Parscal <trevorparscal hotmail.com> writes:
zwang wrote:
 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only 
 a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
 projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I am using it to write a framework for making applications that use OpenGL to render their interface. (http://dsource.org/projects/terra) But, once I get Terra working well enough, I will be embarking on a really ambitious project that is intended to be commercial software. It's a mutlimedia production system with allot of my own inventions thrown into the basic functionality of many popular audio, video, and graphics programs. -- Thanks, Trevor Parscal www.trevorparscal.com trevorparscal hotmail.com
Jun 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Mike Parker <aldacron71 yahoo.com> writes:
zwang wrote:
 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only 
 a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
 projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I have the Derelict project at dsource (http://www.dsource.org/projects/derelict/), which I'm currently using in 2 other projects: * a game for a contest at gamedev.net * a game framework I have dubbed WMD (the graphics portion being loosely based upon Dave Eberly's Wild Magic 3). I have finally settled on D as my language of choice for my little indie game company, and WMD will be the foundation for at least the first game I attempt to sell.
Jun 23 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Jarrett Billingsley" <kb3ctd2 yahoo.com> writes:
"zwang" <nehzgnaw gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1 digitaldaemon.com...
I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a 
few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I'm also writing a 3D game engine. Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games. But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :) I also use D for just about everything. It's a great text parsing language too.
Jun 24 2005
parent reply Victor Nakoryakov <nail-mail mail.ru> writes:
Jarrett Billingsley wrote:
 "zwang" <nehzgnaw gmail.com> wrote in message 
 news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with only a 
few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are working on D 
projects for more serious purposes, for example, commercial softwares.

I'm also writing a 3D game engine. Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games. But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :)

Hmm, I see D is popular among gamedevers. It's looks like more than 1/5 of D users are gamedevers. I'm use it to write game engine too :). I work in one of Russian gamedev company where I have to work with huge project in C++, I love it but with time it become bigger and bigger cesspit of code. And when I set to D on my spare time, I feel I get into small paradise :). -- Victor (aka nail) Nakoryakov nail-mail<at>mail<dot>ru Krasnoznamensk, Moscow, Russia
Jun 24 2005
next sibling parent reply zwang <nehzgnaw gmail.com> writes:
Victor Nakoryakov wrote:
 Jarrett Billingsley wrote:
 
 "zwang" <nehzgnaw gmail.com> wrote in message 
 news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with 
 only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are 
 working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, 
 commercial softwares.

I'm also writing a 3D game engine. Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games. But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :)

Hmm, I see D is popular among gamedevers. It's looks like more than 1/5 of D users are gamedevers. I'm use it to write game engine too :). I work in one of Russian gamedev company where I have to work with huge project in C++, I love it but with time it become bigger and bigger cesspit of code. And when I set to D on my spare time, I feel I get into small paradise :).

I don't see why D appeals to game developers. The unpredictable pauses of GC are unacceptable, aren't they?
Jun 24 2005
next sibling parent David Medlock <noone nowhere.com> writes:
zwang wrote:
 Victor Nakoryakov wrote:
 
 Jarrett Billingsley wrote:

 "zwang" <nehzgnaw gmail.com> wrote in message 
 news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with 
 only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are 
 working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, 
 commercial softwares.

I'm also writing a 3D game engine. Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games. But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :)

Hmm, I see D is popular among gamedevers. It's looks like more than 1/5 of D users are gamedevers. I'm use it to write game engine too :). I work in one of Russian gamedev company where I have to work with huge project in C++, I love it but with time it become bigger and bigger cesspit of code. And when I set to D on my spare time, I feel I get into small paradise :).

I don't see why D appeals to game developers. The unpredictable pauses of GC are unacceptable, aren't they?

Gc only happens on allocation. Game developers typically use memory pools for Inner-loop allocating. I am also doing some OpenGL stuff with D. -DavidM
Jun 24 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Victor Nakoryakov <nail-mail mail.ru> writes:
zwang wrote:
 I don't see why D appeals to game developers.
 The unpredictable pauses of GC are unacceptable, aren't they?

Using specific approach you can always minimize allocs while frames updation, i.e while playing. Allocations are needed just on mission/scene initialization. Right after init/reinit call gc.fullCollect and voila... let the madness begin :). -- Victor (aka nail) Nakoryakov nail-mail<at>mail<dot>ru Krasnoznamensk, Moscow, Russia
Jun 24 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Trevor Parscal <trevorparscal hotmail.com> writes:
zwang wrote:
 Victor Nakoryakov wrote:
 
 Jarrett Billingsley wrote:

 "zwang" <nehzgnaw gmail.com> wrote in message 
 news:d9ej3v$2hpb$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 I myself use D for fast prototyping and small utility programs with 
 only a few thousand lines of code.  I wonder whether people are 
 working on D projects for more serious purposes, for example, 
 commercial softwares.

I'm also writing a 3D game engine. Not really sure what for, as I'm really not that good at writing games. But it's fun, and it gives me something to do :)

Hmm, I see D is popular among gamedevers. It's looks like more than 1/5 of D users are gamedevers. I'm use it to write game engine too :). I work in one of Russian gamedev company where I have to work with huge project in C++, I love it but with time it become bigger and bigger cesspit of code. And when I set to D on my spare time, I feel I get into small paradise :).

I don't see why D appeals to game developers. The unpredictable pauses of GC are unacceptable, aren't they?

Yes, I too thought that that was going to cause problems, but after actually implimenting my design, my framerates are extrmemly consitent, moreso than I ever got with a C++ program... And no i can't explain why my C++ program, with a practicly identical design would lag from time to time, but it did. Anyhoo, D is good for game developers I guess, cause it lets complex things get done fast with less code, and in game development, there are allot of things, especially object oriented things, that get rather complex, that D can really simplify. Its also really good for parsing text, as someone else mentioned, so, reading in models and such is also easy. -- Thanks, Trevor Parscal www.trevorparscal.com trevorparscal hotmail.com
Jun 24 2005
prev sibling parent Mike Parker <aldacron71 yahoo.com> writes:
zwang wrote:

 
 I don't see why D appeals to game developers.
 The unpredictable pauses of GC are unacceptable, aren't they?

Memory management is always a concern in games. Every AAA C/C++ engine on the market includes some form of custom memory management. In D we get it for free. As for GC pauses, I've not had a problem with them. Aside from using GC friendly practices (such as avoiding frequent allocations of small objects), D gives the option to bypass GC if it does become a problem that you can't solve with freelists or some such.
Jun 24 2005
prev sibling parent "Jim H" <jhewesNOSPAM ix.netcom.com> writes:
"Victor Nakoryakov" <nail-mail mail.ru> wrote in message 
news:d9h5uu$2p6i$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Hmm, I see D is popular among gamedevers. It's looks like more than 1/5 of 
 D users are gamedevers.

Yes, this is the impression I got. Perhaps this is because writing games is a big hobby activity and D is also attractive for hobby use. I agree that D is a nice language. I'd rather be able to use it instead of C++. But being a good language is, unfortunately, not enough of a reason for me to be able to use it for serious work where I'm answerable to other people. I need to use a language that is also fairly widespread. I think there is a chicken and egg problem for D (probably as there is for almost all the lesser-used languages). You cannot use it for serious work until it is already used by many people in well-known companies creating well-known products that are selling. It needs to get a critical mass somehow. Until then, I believe it will be a hobby language. One minor improvement to the D web site might be if it showed off some non-trivial sample programs written in D. (Perhaps they would be open source or perhaps not.) For example, if I go to the wxWidgets site I can see several examples of programs written with wxWidgets. Right on the front page is a list of programs like AOL Communicator and Forte Agent. I didn't see anything like that at the D site, unless I messed it. Jim
Jun 25 2005