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digitalmars.D - Introductions

reply "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could run 
the introductions again. (This already happened about 2 years ago: 
http://www.digitalmars.com/d/archives/11799.html). You can add other 
things if you want to.

Name: Carlos Andrés Santander Bernal
Age: 22
Location: Quito, Ecuador
Background:
I'm a computer sciences/software engineering/computers engineering 
student (the formal title is systems engineering, but the focus is on 
everything, from programming to databases to networking to ... we're 
supposed to be ready to be db administrators, network administrators, 
project leaders, and we shouldn't aim to being programmers. Cool, ah?), 
currently doing my thesis and working half-time in a software 
development company.
I started programming in GW-Basic when I was 8 or something like that. 
Years later I moved to QBasic and the VB6 (all that just for fun). Then 
it was university time, so I learned bits of C, C++ (not really, just 
Turbo C++ 3), Java, Delphi, Lisp, Prolog, HTML, C#, T-SQL, JavaScript, 
JSP, and others that I don't remember. When I was taking Compilers, I 
wanted to write my own (still waiting) so searching for open source 
compilers I ran into D. That was almost 3 years ago.
What I've done in D:
I've started a lot of things, but have finished few. Recently I was 
playing with the DMDScript source and posted my results. I think I was 
successful at what I wanted. I also started the Apollo library, which is 
supposed to be a GUI library built over the Borland VCL using Delphi 6. 
However, my (never ending) lack of time hasn't allowed me to go any 
further, and I don't think there's much interest on it because the 
Delphi 6 Personal Edition (the one I have) doesn't allow to use it for 
commercial applications. Besides that, a couple of uni projects, but 
mainly personal thingies.

So, anybody else?

_______________________
Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 03 2005
next sibling parent clayasaurus <clayasaurus gmail.com> writes:
Name: Clay Smith
Age: 19
Location: Pennsylvania, United States
Background:
    Taught myself C with "C Primer Plus" using a c++ compiler. I always 
wanted to make a game, I was a computer game addict for a time, in some 
ways still am.
    My friends all happened to be into computers, and introduced me to 
linux, which was nice. Me and my friends attempted to make a 3D wargame 
our high school year, (warcoders.sf.net).. but things went sour with my 
stupid school admins afraid of us "hacking" the network, the plug was 
pulled :-/
    Around some time I started my own personal project (claytek.sf.net), 
and being the only one, as the size of the project grew, it took longer 
and longer to make even the slightest changes to the structure of code.
    I read a slashdot article about D, and decided to give it a shot. I 
learned D is a very nice and easy transition from C++, and the tool 
dmake is absolutely awesome, plus DMD compiler speed is incredible.
    I converted my project to D, and it sits at dsource.org ('claytek'). 
My time is all consumed by college now :-/
    I'm a freshman majoring in comp sci. The next programming book I am 
very excited about owning is the official D programming book!

Carlos Santander B. wrote:
 Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could run 
 the introductions again. (This already happened about 2 years ago: 
 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/archives/11799.html). You can add other 
 things if you want to.
 
 Name: Carlos Andrés Santander Bernal
 Age: 22
 Location: Quito, Ecuador
 Background:
 I'm a computer sciences/software engineering/computers engineering 
 student (the formal title is systems engineering, but the focus is on 
 everything, from programming to databases to networking to ... we're 
 supposed to be ready to be db administrators, network administrators, 
 project leaders, and we shouldn't aim to being programmers. Cool, ah?), 
 currently doing my thesis and working half-time in a software 
 development company.
 I started programming in GW-Basic when I was 8 or something like that. 
 Years later I moved to QBasic and the VB6 (all that just for fun). Then 
 it was university time, so I learned bits of C, C++ (not really, just 
 Turbo C++ 3), Java, Delphi, Lisp, Prolog, HTML, C#, T-SQL, JavaScript, 
 JSP, and others that I don't remember. When I was taking Compilers, I 
 wanted to write my own (still waiting) so searching for open source 
 compilers I ran into D. That was almost 3 years ago.
 What I've done in D:
 I've started a lot of things, but have finished few. Recently I was 
 playing with the DMDScript source and posted my results. I think I was 
 successful at what I wanted. I also started the Apollo library, which is 
 supposed to be a GUI library built over the Borland VCL using Delphi 6. 
 However, my (never ending) lack of time hasn't allowed me to go any 
 further, and I don't think there's much interest on it because the 
 Delphi 6 Personal Edition (the one I have) doesn't allow to use it for 
 commercial applications. Besides that, a couple of uni projects, but 
 mainly personal thingies.
 
 So, anybody else?
 
 _______________________
 Carlos Santander Bernal

Feb 03 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ctufra$12vt$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could run
 the introductions again.

www.walterbright.com
Feb 03 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Chris Sauls <Chris_member pathlink.com> writes:
Name: Christopher Grant Sauls
Age: 23
Location: Owensboro, KY, USA
Background:
Taught myself BASIC/1a on an old TRS-80 Model 4P, later took a high school
course on C.  Later learned Java2 (also self-taught), and stuck with those two
for quite a while -- aside from learning some specialty and scripting languages,
like XML, PHP, etc.  Ran across D a couple years ago, and have pretty well loved
it from first sight.

What I've done in D:
I've either started or am involved in the following:
-- Sinbad -- A port of the OGRE 3D engine... currently in a re-thinking phase.
-- Mango -- a kick-arse library, which I helped debug a bit in its early stages,
and still use.
-- Cashew -- some general add-ons for Mango; currently strictly for my own
personal use, but I might make something distributable later, like a minimal XML
parser, a D source parser, that kinda thing.
-- NeoMOO -- a new MOO server, based on Xerox PARC's LambdaMOO, still in alpha.
-- NeoConv -- a utility to convert LambdaMOO database files into NeoMOO world
directories.
-- ABCD -- my friend's project to write a BitTorrent client, based on the ABC
client written in Python, hence the name.
-- JRView -- a little utility for a friend, basically read a playlist from a
website and made it available from his system tray.
-- "Otakutron" -- working name for a game engine I'm helping the same friend
work on, basically for making Japanese-style 2D "A/H-games".
-- Yam -- Yet-Another-Mud, a threaded multi-user server which is built by
glueing together Mango and DMDScript... still in planning stages.

-- Chris Sauls
Feb 03 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Niall FitzGibbon <billdoor gmail.com> writes:
Name: Niall FitzGibbon
Age: 23
Background:
Unemployed at the moment. I didn't study computers in any official 
capacity at school or university, so I'm trying to break into the 
industry the hard way I guess. I started programming in BASIC on an old 
Atari 400 when I was 9, though it took me a while since I was given the 
computer and didn't have any manuals ;) Later went on to QBasic when I 
got my first PC -- I guess that a lot of people did this in the early 
90s, and there must have been thousands of "super duper" versions of 
gorilla and nibbles around. Finally started learning C when I was about 
14, but didn't really get good at it until I got online at university 
and was able to work with other people on projects and learn from them. 
At the moment, I'm working mainly in C++ as lead programmer on a 
Half-Life 2 mod project: http://www.fortress-forever.com.

What I've done in D:
Not much, yet. I've started several things. First, a conversion of my 
tree-based data structure from C++ to D -- the C++ version will be used 
to hold game configuration data in Fortress Forever.

Second, I'm working on a genetic programming library in D. It has a 
simple ASM-style program syntax with user-defined opcodes/functions and 
variable number of arguments for each one. Won't be finished for ages, 
since all my efforts are concentrated on my game project right now.

In the near future, I'm considering the possibility of using D to create 
the anti-cheat software that will be included with Fortress Forever. 
Anti-cheat software is rather a tricky issue because the client machine 
is essentially untrusted (especially if they're actively trying to cheat 
;)) and so it is one area where obfuscation and regular updating are 
more important than things like encryption strength. For this reason, 
I'm considering writing it in D because most disassemblers (particularly 
IDA Pro, which almost all cheat creators use) do not yet have library 
signatures and accurate program flow analysis for D -- and D's new 
inbuilt structures such as associative arrays and so on will hopefully 
confuse the hell out of any reverse engineers. If I actually go ahead 
with this anti-cheat software in D, then I'll hopefully be able to 
release some low-level libraries that other people can use, such as ones 
for function detouring, PE loading, memory pattern matching, etc..
Feb 04 2005
parent "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"Niall FitzGibbon" <billdoor gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ctvm1r$27ik$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In the near future, I'm considering the possibility of using D to create
 the anti-cheat software that will be included with Fortress Forever.
 Anti-cheat software is rather a tricky issue because the client machine
 is essentially untrusted (especially if they're actively trying to cheat
 ;)) and so it is one area where obfuscation and regular updating are
 more important than things like encryption strength. For this reason,
 I'm considering writing it in D because most disassemblers (particularly
 IDA Pro, which almost all cheat creators use) do not yet have library
 signatures and accurate program flow analysis for D -- and D's new
 inbuilt structures such as associative arrays and so on will hopefully
 confuse the hell out of any reverse engineers. If I actually go ahead
 with this anti-cheat software in D, then I'll hopefully be able to
 release some low-level libraries that other people can use, such as ones
 for function detouring, PE loading, memory pattern matching, etc..

LOL. Be sure and use a few nested functions, and maybe some foreach with opApply. That should confuse any reverse engineering program designed for the output of C or C++.
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Ben Hinkle <Ben_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <ctufra$12vt$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Carlos Santander B. says...
Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could run 
the introductions again. (This already happened about 2 years ago: 
http://www.digitalmars.com/d/archives/11799.html). You can add other 
things if you want to.

I can't find my introduction in that archive so here's the short form: Name: Ben Hinkle Age: 35 Location: Boston, MA Background: Born and raised in beautiful Ithaca, NY. Dual undergrad degree in Math/CS from Cornell. PhD in dynamical system from SUNY Stony Brook. Worked on the MacMath programs from Springer-Verlag. Worked for ~2 years at Waterloo Maple in Waterloo Canada as a developer for Mac platform support and with the graphics group. Currently at The MathWorks as a developer in the graphics group for MATLAB. I've been interested in D for a couple of years now and have written a wrapper around the GMP library, a container library (MinTL) and helped port (with Mike Swieton) Doug Lea's concurrent Java library. Oh yeah - I also jumbled together the d-mode support for emacs (though my emacs lisp is so bad it gets many things wrong). Now I'm poking around with MinWin.
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Mike Parker <aldacron71 yahoo.com> writes:
Name: Michael David Parker
Age: 33
Location: Seoul, Korea
Background:
The first program I ever learned to write:

10 ? "Mike"
20 GOTO 10

Or something like that (can't recall if it used quotes or not). I was 
quite young, somewhere between 8 and 10 I think. I knew from that moment 
that I wanted to be a programmer. Circumstances led me away from that 
path for quite some time. I came to Korea in 1991 with the US Army, 
extended my tour of duty twice because I liked it so much, and then 
picked up an English teaching job in 1994 as soon as my enlistment was 
over. I finally turned back to coding in 1998 when I came out of the 
nightclubs long enough to buy a computer.

My primary focus was C and Java, though I couldn't avoid C++ (as much as 
I wanted to). I've also picked up the usual suspects in scripting 
(Python, Perl, PHP, JS, etc...). In the last few years I've managed to 
land some contract work (mostly J2EE stuff) through some of my English 
students. The most visible project being a J2EE backend for the first 
iteration of this website 2 years ago (though apparently our original 
work has been scrapped since, along with the original employees) : 
http://www.dreamcasting.co.kr/.

I am infatuated with game programming, and have spent nearly every 
second of the last few years learning everything I can. I've knocked out 
a handful of old skool clones in C (Asteroids, Pong, PacMan and such) 
and moved on to 3D, AI, Audio, Networking, the whole shebang. For the 
past year I've been gradually moving toward the goal of starting my own 
Independent game company to produce downloadable games. This has 
involved evaluating several language and library/engine combinations 
(Java & LWJGL/JOGL, C/C++ & Torque, OGRE, ODE, SDL, and a gazillion 
others). It was my quest for 'something different' that led me to D. It 
helps that my current teaching schedule only requires me to work 11 
hrs/week :)

What I've done in D:

The only major thing I've done in D is to start the Derelict project at 
DSource.org. For those who don't know, it's a collection of bindings to 
C libraries that are useful for multimedia apps (read games). The 
difference between Derelict and the other bindings out there is that 
Derelict loads shared libraries manually via std.loader rather than by 
requiring that the app link to an import library. Derelict currently 
contains bindings for:

OpenGL
GLU
OpenAL
SDL
SDL_image
SDL_mixer
SDL_ttf

SDL_net and GLFW are next on the hit list, as soon as I get around to 
them. I spent some time wrestling with Python bindings, but gave up for 
the time being. Eventually, I hope to add several more bindings to the 
project.

I'm also toying around with some game-related ideas in D. Some of what 
results from them I might release on DSource under another project. I'm 
still torn on exactly which way to go for my game programming, but D is 
looking better and better every day :)
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Daan Oosterveld <daan.oosterveld home.nl> writes:
Name: Daan Oosterveld
Age: 24
Location: the Netherlands
I started of on a Sinclair ZX81 programming Basic. Wasn't much fun 
because the computer overheated within 30 minutes, just when I was able 
to type in a program. And bam!, a whole spectrum of 4096 colors on my 
Amiga 500. I programmed some basic in Amos but because you can't to 
anything funky with basic on a 3Mhz computer I had to do something 
faster. So I learned 68k Assembler from scratch to make use of the 
Blitter and Copper coproccesors. (I still know the register adresses ;) ).
When PCs became fast enough (300Mhz+) to do something usefull I stared 
programming applications: E (funky little language discussed earlier) as 
a first step to OOP, C, C++. Then I said goodbye to my rusty 25Mhz Amiga 
4000/030. Finaly a PC could match the visual performance.
I use REBOL for fast procedural, Java, PHP for webdev, Ruby for OOP 
scripting, Objective-C or C++ for applications. Mostly on linux, because 
it's a proper development environment.

I had my share of programming languages. I know the pittfalls and which 
languages is best suited for some problems. D is a good replacement for 
C++ and Objective-C, the primary languages I develop with. But there are 
still some features missing and I intent to fill the void ;)

I'll be using D for programming Animation/video/3D/XML/XSLT, etc. 
Anything related with media.

Currently I am a studing for my bachelor in Arts & Technology.
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent David L. Davis <SpottedTiger yahoo.com> writes:
Name: David L. 'SpottedTiger' Davis
Age: 48 (gee! I don't feel this old)
Location: Pennsylvania, United States

Background:
Born in an age before Personal Computers, I was one of the first in my family to
buy PCs when they became more affordable like the TI-99/4A 16-bit cpu 16Kb
(found out later that it was slower than an 8-bit computer), Vic-20 8-bit cpu
32Kb (8Kb + 24Kb expanded memory card), C64 6508 1Mhz 8-bit cpu with 64Kb (48Kb
direct with 16Kb bank switched between the ROM and RAM) and then finally I got a
real PC...a IBM XT 10Mhz Intel-8086 8/16-bit cpu with 1Mb memory (640Kb base,
384Kb with a EMS driver) and had MS-DOS v4.02 as the OS which had amber and
black screen that used a Hercules graphic card. And have since been using MS-DOS
/ Windows v3.xx, Win95, Win98, Win98 SE, WinME, and finally moved to NT leaving
the DOS world behind forever with WinXP (which I feel is the very best version
of Windows I've ever used). 

Spented 11 1/2 years in the U.S. Army, the first four as a Infantry foot soldier
(MOS 11B) hopping out of helicopters to foot it the rest of the way to the
detestations, a TOW (MOS 11H) driver/anti-tank gunner on a jeep in South Korea,
and finally to the Mechanized Infantry using M118 Tracks as a TOW
driver/anti-tank gunner to support M60 tanks. The latter part of my Army service
I worked has a Computer Operator (MOS 74D) on IBM 360/370/4341 mainframes, in
which I ran jobs that order equipment and supplies need by other Army units…and
made the rank of Sergeant (E-5).

Have programmed in Basic (TI-99/A Basic, Vic-20 MS Basic, C64 MS Basic, C64
Comal, IBM BasicA, MS GW-Basic, MS QBasic v4.5, Borland Turbo Basic v1.0 now
called PowerBasic, and MS Visual Basic v1.0-6.0), Pascal (Borland’s Turbo
Pascal), Cobol (IBM mainframes), played a little with Forth and Logo, Fortran in
college, Assembly (on IBM mainframes, C64, and Intel PCs), C/C++ (mainly with
Borland’s compiler), and more than a year and a half ago discovered D with it’s
wonderful Basic / Turbo Pascal like strings build into the Language. Even though
Basic will always be my primary language, D quickly move into second place
pushing C into third…:P

Currently in D, I’ve created (some seven months ago) and activity maintain a “D
Programming Language” website (at
http://spottedtiger.tripod.com/D_Language/D_Main_XP.html) that mainly has
entry-level type code (in which I’ve written and converted thousands line of
code in D), some (hopefully) helpful D modules / projects and data /
information. Also I can’t wait to see D move to v1.0, and for the combined
talents of Walter and Matthew to publish the very first English-written D book
(but Japanese do get credit for writing the first D book…it’s just too bad none
of us can reading it…unless we speak Japanese of course).

Anyway, everyone, “Keep Truckin’ !!” and writing more code in D. :))

-------------------------------------------------------------------
"Dare to reach for the Stars...Dare to Dream, Build, and Achieve!"
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Carlos Santander B. wrote:
 Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could run 
 the introductions again. (This already happened about 2 years ago: 
 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/archives/11799.html). You can add other 
 things if you want to.
 

Oh no! You /had/ to link to that post, didn't you! Lol! :-P A few things have changed since then, although I'm still an EMT. I've been a little more involved in D since then. :-) Later, John R.
Feb 04 2005
parent "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 Carlos Santander B. wrote:
 
 Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could 
 run the introductions again. (This already happened about 2 years ago: 
 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/archives/11799.html). You can add other 
 things if you want to.

Oh no! You /had/ to link to that post, didn't you! Lol! :-P

Of course: I didn't want to take credit for an idea that wasn't mine :D
 A few things have changed since then, although I'm still an EMT.
 
 I've been a little more involved in D since then. :-)
 
 Later,
 
 John R.

_______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent pragma <pragma_member pathlink.com> writes:
Name: Eric Anderton (aka Pragma)
Age: 27
Location: Washington, DC
Email: ericanderton at yahoo dot com 
Background:
I was born and raised here in the VA suburbs of DC, and now enjoy life on the
less-expensive side of the river (MD).

I'm really a web programmer, although I got my start back in high-school
learning Pascal, C++ and ASM almost simultaneously.  Since then, I've entered
the market as a web contractor, so I had to learn a whole host of other tools:
ASP, SQL, Java, .NET, VB/Access, PHP, HTML, Javascript and ColdFusion.  D,
however, holds a special place for me since its doing something right, something
that all these other languages don't do: keeping what works, and fixing what
doesn't.

Currently I'm working on DSP, a web-development preprocessor/language/platform
for D.  My aim is to have the project mature into a ColdFusion-like platform,
without all the fluff.

I'm also working on a CMS named "Cilantro" in php.  Its currently serving up my
blog and my wife's business site (www.djsolaries.com).  One day, I hope to have
the whole mess ported over to DSP.  In the meantime, I expect to open up the
codebase in a few months, after I get some more features nailed down.

My wiki page has a little more information about what I'm up to.

When not coding at work, and at home, I enjoy spelunking and camping.  Plus,
I've been known to write music, but lately coding seems to be all my muse wants
to talk about. :)

Wiki Page: http://www.prowiki.org/wiki4d/wiki.cgi?EricAnderton
Dev Blog: http://www.djsolaries.com/pragma
DSP: http://www.dsource.org/projects/dsp
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Sebastian Beschke <s.beschke gmx.de> writes:
Name: Sebastian Beschke
Age: 18
Location: Germany, near Hannover
Current Occupation: Civilian Servant in a hospital. Before, I was in 
high school, afterwards I plan on studying computer science, with 
japanology as a minor.
What I've done in D: Mostly Sofud (http://sofu.sf.net/), a file format 
library, and Auf Sie Mit Gebrüll 
(http://randomz.heim.at/aufsie/aufsie11.zip), a puzzle game.
Started programming in QBASIC when I was about 10. Switched to C++ at 15 
or something.
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
Name: John Demme
Age: 19
Location: My hometown is near Princeton, New Jersey, but I'm currently 
attending the University of Maryland at College Park

Background:
Like most of you, I started programming in a BASIC variant around the 
age of 10.  Moved from that to VB, to Perl, some other scripting 
languages, then I finally learned Java about 2.5 years ago.  I've come 
to D from there with no experience in a natively-compiled language (I 
didn't even understand what linking was).  It's been an interesting 
experience.  I've been a Linux geek for about 4 years (won't touch 
Windows now).  I'm currently in my 2nd semester at UMD seeking a Major 
in Computer Engineering.

D stuff:
It's been almost a year since I came across D while searching for a good 
programming language to use on my main project, neuralNexus.  Since 
then, I've spent most of my D programming time working on neuralNexus, a 
database project (neuralnexus.com).

Recently, I've been spending a lot of my not-so-free time on an XML and 
XML-RPC library for Mango.  Although I've found it hard to get around 
some of D's rougher edges due to a lack of experience in C or C++, I'm 
addicted.
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Charles wrote:
 wow this reads terribly, how do i delete it ?

Hmm? I didn't think it read terribly. I thought it was interesting (as all the introductions have been so far; it's kind of like reading a mini autobiography). In fact, since you mentioned a debugger and ide in the works, I'm very much looking forward to what you eventually release, free or not. If you /really/ want to delete, I guess that depends on which newsreader you are using. You should be able to "cancel" the message from most newsreaders. I use Mozilla Thunderbird. It has a "cancel message" option in a context menu that pops up when I right click on the message. Later, John R.
Feb 04 2005
parent reply "Charles" <no email.com> writes:
Yea I use outlook express I can't find that option .  I downloaded
thunderbird and tried to cancel that way , it looked successful but I can
still see it in outlook. :S

Charlie
"John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:cu19ij$mt2$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Charles wrote:
 wow this reads terribly, how do i delete it ?

Hmm? I didn't think it read terribly. I thought it was interesting (as all the introductions have been so far; it's kind of like reading a mini autobiography). In fact, since you mentioned a debugger and ide in the works, I'm very much looking forward to what you eventually release, free or not. If you /really/ want to delete, I guess that depends on which newsreader you are using. You should be able to "cancel" the message from most newsreaders. I use Mozilla Thunderbird. It has a "cancel message" option in a context menu that pops up when I right click on the message. Later, John R.

Feb 04 2005
parent John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Charles wrote:
 Yea I use outlook express I can't find that option .  I downloaded
 thunderbird and tried to cancel that way , it looked successful but I can
 still see it in outlook. :S
 
 Charlie

It was successful. I can't see the message contents anymore when I click on it. It displays "Error! Bad article number" instead. If you are still skeptical whether it worked or not, you could always check the web interface to see if it's gone there also. Later, John R.
Feb 04 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Dave <Dave_member pathlink.com> writes:
Name: Dave
Age: 40
Location: Central Minnesota, US

Background:

Graduated - barely - with a BS in Manufacturing Engineering Technology. Unlike
most here it seems, I didn't start programming until later on in life at the age
of about 28 or so. 

Have worked on a few 'nix systems as well as quite a bit of work on MS platforms
and a little OS/400 encompassing most business orientated application areas,
with past emphasis on building custom graphical reports from the Win32 API on up
(for performance reasons; lots and lots of data and BIG graphics) and custom
multi-tier and/or web-based Project Mgmt., CRM and ERP type software. Started
programming hand-held laser scanners in BASIC for an inventory control
application during my internship, and am currently doing work on/with network
security related applications designed for high-throughput implementations on
commodity hardware.

Have done work from DBA to software architecture/development to sys. admin.
Currently doing quite a bit of C/++, embedded DB, perl and shell scripting work.
Fell in love with programming when I saw my brother-in-law's pay check whilst
moving furniture for a job at the time ;) Really, really like D because it is a
large step forward in many respects and I find myself appreciating it ever more
since I learned of it back in August of last year.

This is the best newsgroup centered "community" that I've followed for any
period of time, full of smart yet genuinely amicable people, which seems rare to
say the least. I'm pretty confident D will make a positive impact on the IT and
CS communities in general and want to be along for the ride. Would like to
contribute more, but have had trouble finding the time and will keep searching
for the time <g>.
Feb 05 2005
parent "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
 This is the best newsgroup centered "community" that I've followed for 
 any
 period of time, full of smart yet genuinely amicable people, which 
 seems rare to
 say the least.

That's what I've found also. Although people have strong opinions - often with the experience to back them up - they're generally game to listen to others and/or admit they're wrong. You really don't find that much anywhere else. The tone and content started heading south badly last year, which, along with time squeeze, caused me to loose interest (in the ng, at least). It seems to be back up to scruff now. (I'm open to the possibility that its improvement and my absence may not be coincidental. Sniff!) :-) -- Matthew Wilson Author: "Imperfect C++", Addison-Wesley, 2004 (http://www.imperfectcplusplus.com) Contributing editor, C/C++ Users Journal (http://www.synesis.com.au/articles.html#columns) Director, Synesis Software (www.synesis.com.au) STLSoft moderator (http://www.stlsoft.org) Synesis Software Pty Ltd P.O.Box 125 Waverley New South Wales, 2024 Australia -----------------------------------------------------
Feb 05 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
Name: Matthew Wilson
Age: 36
Location: Sydney, Australia. (It's now 7:30 am, and sunnier and warmer 
than it ever gets back home in England <g>.)
Background:

    - school / 6th-form college - was far too easy, leaving me to enter 
Uni / work with an over-inflated view of what I could achieve with 
little effort, and how much that'd be appreciated by 
professors/employers. Bump!
    - 1 year Chem degree. Didn't like
    - 1 year working in chemical engineering company. Ouch! The real 
world of work for someone without a degree proved a *lot* tougher than 
I'd expected. No-one cared about my academic prizes, or potential, just 
kept me on that bottom rung with their acid-proof boots on my neck.
    - 4 years Information Technology / Software Engineering. After the 
nasty real world of work, this was an absolute doddle. I tutored several 
friends in my secret exam passing techniques, and they all did really 
well. :-)
    - 3 years PhD 'Photonic Packet-Switching Networks'. Much to the 
chagrin of my mother-in-law, I did a PhD so I could spend three more 
years riding my bike. And I did! :-) You'll probably not be surprised to 
learn that I submitted the largest thesis in my department's history, or 
in my examiners experience. He revenged himself on me by giving me a 4 
and half hour viva. Even I find it a challenge to talk for that long. 
Suffice to say the mouth was somewhat dry by the end ....
    - 18 months at a communications company in England. Thrown straight 
into the deep end working on embedded primary rate ISDN servers and LAN 
access cards. 128 tasks running simultaneously on a proprietary 
operating system. Can't say I understood it all at the time, but 
Win32/PHTREADS multithreading never scared me after that!
    - moved to Australia, got a job at company X, working under two 
'architects' whose egos were considerably more impressive than their 
technical and personal skills. The company liked to tread on people, or 
isolate those who cannot be trod on. The manager bullied one of my 
friends - she was a bit slow on the SLOCs front, but was very careful 
and produced good quality work - which, in my resignation letter, I told 
them 'was the last cherry on the sleazy cake'. Best resignation I ever 
had. (Tip: Resigning a crap job, without another lined up, is one of the 
most liberating experiences one can have.)
    - since I'd found the quality of management in my short career 
patchy, to say the least, I decided I wouldn't have one anymore, and 
became a contractor. A decision I've never had occasion to regret, 
although my wife probably wouldn't concur.
    - did 3 months of a contract working on COM/DCOM/C++, but had to 
return to England for a year due to a family tragedy
    - back in Aus, started my own company. Designed and implemented data 
caching and delivery layer (C++ / COM / TibCo) for busiest transactional 
website in the Southern Hemisphere - which gets a woo hoo! until one 
realises the proportion of the world's population live that lives in the 
top half - which have run without a single ms of downtime for the last 
five and half years.
    - did a year for the world's largest data warehousing company. Had a 
great working relationship with their Dev manager (also a pommie), with 
whom I was tasked to adapt a parser base provided from the US parent 
company to the Australian market. I can still recall the teleconference: 
"we don't expect you to be able to make it fast, but just do your best". 
Ah, underestimation, that most underestimated of stimuli. Within 3 weeks 
we had a working parser infrastructure and several filters which 
outperformed their 25-years-of-parsing technology both in speed and in 
accuracy. Within 3 months it had become their company standard address 
parser. How d'ya like them apples. :-)
    - next contract worked as Software Quality Manager for company doing 
e-Commerce in J2EE. This was the worst organised / skilled (both 
technically and managerially) client I've ever had. The only time I've 
had occasion to shout at people in the workplace - usually because 
they'd ignored the instruction to "only check in tested code" within an 
hour of the daily morning meeting during which myself and the 
Development Manager both stressed that. Tip: if you find yourself 
shouting at people because of their incompetence / unprofessionalism, 
leave. Now! It's hurting you at least as much as it's hurting them.
    - started working for a (former) friend on an internet related 
startup. He said they could (and would) pay me. They didn't. We ended up 
having a protracted legal battle, which I won. We've never subsequently 
spoken. :-(  Tip: When working for a startup, don't let the payment 
window stretch more than two weeks; as soon as it does, down tools and 
find a proper job.
    - the great thing about the legal stuff is that, because it took so 
long, we gained two valuable things: I had time on my hands to think 
about what I wanted to do and to do it, and we learned that we didn't 
actually need IT/internet-bubble level income on which to survive. By 
the time the money came, we'd gone into survival mode, and were able to 
live off it for most of the next two years, during which my publishing 
career, such as it is, took off: I've written the book Imperfect C++ 
(http://imperfectcplusplus.com), and am a contributing editor / 
columnist for C/C++ Users Journal (http://cuj.com) and The C++ Source 
(http://artima.com/cppsource/). I'm about to start work on my next two 
books Extended STL and, with Walter, D Programming Distilled.
    - since the completion of Imperfect C++, in July last year, I've 
been working on a network infrastructure project for a large insurance 
company here in Aus, in a disparate mix of technologies: 
C/C++/ACE/TibCo/COM/WTL/Ruby/C#/C++.NET/. My components interface 
several systems, providing the communications glue, arbitrating on 
message destination between legacy mainframe and new system, auditing, 
etc. etc. It's been a lot of fun, but not exactly the post-IC++ holiday 
I had planned. Maybe when the next two books are done I can take it 
easy. Tip: Make sure you're getting daily doses of sunlight and 
endorphins when working really hard (especially when you're no longer in 
your 20s), otherwise the body just gets gummed-up.

As for the future:
    - I have the next two books to write, and I've got plans for about 
another 5. (Though I'm *never* going to do anything as hard as Imperfect 
C++ again. NEVER!)
    - I look forward to releasing / updating several of my libraries, 
including b64, DTL!!, recls 2.0, the next STLSoft (which has gained a 
considerable number of components as a result of my recent project). And 
doing decent documentation for them!!!
    - finding a better balance in life; being able to read the 50+ new 
books sitting in my office (and the 30+ non-computing ones gathering 
dust on the lounge bookshelf); getting back to the levels of exercise I 
had a few years ago; spending more time with my kids; learning to play 
bass in time for my kids to learn the piano and drums;

Eventually, I'd like to semi-retire from IT, write the odd book, and 
open a chocolaterie, though I fear my chances may be slim.

Oh, and it'd be nice to see even one of the world's biological systems 
brought back from decline. Otherwise our kids are not going to have the 
relatively easy lives that we have had, never mind getting to see The 
Barrier Reef in all its splendour.

Cheers to all in D-world and beyond

Matthew
Feb 05 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
As usual, an very interesting writeup, Matthew.

So the moral of the story: if you can make a happy, stress-free living 
as a garbage man, stick with that. ;-)

Success is one of those rare qualities that few people fathom.  Is 
success found by making a name for oneself in this world, or is it found 
in serving, supporting, or exhorting those within your realm of 
influence?  Which of these translates to true fulfillment?  I've had to 
meditate on these details in my own life.  It's nice to see a balance in 
such consideration as you have shown.

If you ever start that chocolate shop of yours, I'll have to stop in for 
a tea and Swiss chocolate.

All the best,

John R.
Feb 05 2005
next sibling parent "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
 As usual, an very interesting writeup, Matthew.

 So the moral of the story: if you can make a happy, stress-free living 
 as a garbage man, stick with that. ;-)

 Success is one of those rare qualities that few people fathom.  Is 
 success found by making a name for oneself in this world, or is it 
 found in serving, supporting, or exhorting those within your realm of 
 influence?  Which of these translates to true fulfillment?  I've had 
 to meditate on these details in my own life.  It's nice to see a 
 balance in such consideration as you have shown.

 If you ever start that chocolate shop of yours, I'll have to stop in 
 for a tea and Swiss chocolate.

You'd be exceedingly welcome. :-)
Feb 05 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
 As usual, an very interesting writeup, Matthew.

Thanks. I'm thinking of gathering together such things into a small book sometime. Do you think that'd have much pull? I think I'll probably start blogging on this stuff, and take it from there. wodayafink?
Feb 05 2005
parent John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Matthew wrote:
As usual, an very interesting writeup, Matthew.

Thanks. I'm thinking of gathering together such things into a small book sometime. Do you think that'd have much pull?

Yep. I think people like reading about aspects of other peoples lives, especially their failures ;-) (discretely done; too many details can take the wind out of it). This needs to be balanced with narratives of successes. One can't have the readers getting depressed. I know some of the bizarre stories I bring home from work keep my family members entertained. Heh, I find the process almost therapeutic.
 I think I'll probably start blogging on this stuff, and take it from 
 there. wodayafink?
 

Like I said, I've enjoyed reading what others of contributed to this thread. The human factor is fascinating to read. I've always prefered biographies and auto-biographies to fiction. Blogs seem to be "the thing" right now; they're especially interesting when their done by people with lives full of experiences and interaction with other people (and why do people watch soaps? <groan>). Add a pinch of humour and nack for writing, and you've got it made. You seem to be adequately endowed with both qualities. :-) Blog away, my friend. Later, John
Feb 05 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Andrew Fedoniouk" <news terrainformatica.com> writes:
Andrew Fedoniouk.

I am a professional programmer since 1986. Fortran, Pascal, C/C++, Java and 
various scripts. And my c:) of course
Education: MS in physics and applied mathematics and Diploma in Arts 
(college level). Both in Russia. Precisely - in USSR (it was such country 
who didn't remember). Started career in Russian aerospace industry. After 
that were doing computations in medicine. After that in telecommunications. 
And now my main areas of professional interests are design of HTML rendering 
engines and GUI design in general.

Andrew Fedoniouk
http://terrainformatica.com
Vancouver, Canada
Feb 05 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Andrew Fedoniouk wrote:
 Andrew Fedoniouk.
 
 I am a professional programmer since 1986. Fortran, Pascal, C/C++, Java and 
 various scripts. And my c:) of course
 Education: MS in physics and applied mathematics and Diploma in Arts 
 (college level). Both in Russia. Precisely - in USSR (it was such country 
 who didn't remember). Started career in Russian aerospace industry. After 
 that were doing computations in medicine. After that in telecommunications. 
 And now my main areas of professional interests are design of HTML rendering 
 engines and GUI design in general.
 
 Andrew Fedoniouk
 http://terrainformatica.com
 Vancouver, Canada
 

Hey Andrew, Welcome! You are only a few hours south of me (Williams Lake). I know another Russian Programmer from Vancouver. Later, John R.
Feb 05 2005
parent "Andrew Fedoniouk" <news terrainformatica.com> writes:
 Welcome!  You are only a few hours south of me (Williams Lake).

 I know another Russian Programmer from Vancouver.

Feb 06 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Regan Heath" <regan netwin.co.nz> writes:
Name: Regan Michael Heath
Age: 24
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Background:

I have been 'into' computers for as long as I can remember.

It started at age 8 with a battered old micro that operated with a tape  
deck and the television. I would get those 'usborne?' programming books  
 from the library and would have to mix and match to find code that worked  
with my particular odd-ball uncommon brand of micro.

I moved on to BASIC on the first IBM we bought when I was 12 or something.
I also tried to program the Apple IIe we had at school at about the same  
time.

I didn't get into 'serious' programming until I was 18 where I was offered  
a job with a small company "Netwin LTD" as an alternative to getting  
formal qualifications.

I was taught C by the book "C Programming Language" by "Brian W. Kernighan  
and Dennis M. Ritchie" and of course the people I now worked with. My  
education has therefore been almost entirely practical.

I have dabbled in C++ and Java and most recently D.

I did at one stage attempt to get formal qualifications, I managed to  
wrangle it so I skipped stage 1 university and started at stage 2, the 2  
papers I did prooved to be almost totally useless to me and so I left.

I spend a large proportion of my spare time playing computer games, I  
intend never to 'grow out' of this. In fact I consider my ideal job to be  
programming computer games.

My current non computer related hobbies include Soccer and Music, I am in  
an Original Rock Band here in Auckland. In the past I have been involved  
in as many sports as I could manage i.e. Cricket, Soccer, Hockey,  
Volleyball, and Karate so I am not your stereotypical computer 'geek'. I  
am however a roleplayer, both computer and PnP which makes me an ever  
bigger 'geek' than most.

I have contributed very little to D as yet, the crypto hashing routines in  
Deimos being my only concrete contribution. I intend to continue to poke  
my nose into everything on this NG, adding my opinion and hopefully  
helping to shape D into the language we all dream of.

Having run out of things to say...

Regan
Feb 06 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Regan Heath wrote:

<snip>

 My current non computer related hobbies include Soccer and Music, I am 
 in  an Original Rock Band here in Auckland. In the past I have been 
 involved  in as many sports as I could manage i.e. Cricket, Soccer, 
 Hockey,  Volleyball, and Karate so I am not your stereotypical computer 
 'geek'. I  am however a roleplayer, both computer and PnP which makes me 
 an ever  bigger 'geek' than most.
 

I think few people in this field fit the stereotypical geek profile anymore. Although, television and movies still feed the publics misconceptions in this regard. The "hacker" era of the 80's probably was more concentrated with the old geek types. Now, there's many more people and much more variety involved in computer science. - John R.
Feb 06 2005
parent reply "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:cu6h5v$2tl5$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I think few people in this field fit the stereotypical geek profile

I do.
Feb 06 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Walter wrote:
 "John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
 news:cu6h5v$2tl5$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
I think few people in this field fit the stereotypical geek profile

anymore. I do.

He he, well you must be a special, multi-faceted geek then, which makes you even more special than us wannabes. Stereotypical geeks don't jog. I believe you do. Stereotypical geeks don't rebuild novelty cars. That's something you do, isn't it? Walter, as much as you may aspire to it, I'm afraid I can't give you the official seal of stereotypical geekdom. As one of your loyal fans, that can't happen. Yeah, you're a geek, but, sorry, you don't qualify for TV. Ah, but who cares? I guess it really doesn't matter anyway, does it? More than half the people on the list have some sort of geek blood flowing through their veins or they wouldn't be sticking around to see where D goes. Have I dug myself deep enough yet? :-) - John R.
Feb 06 2005
next sibling parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:cu6rbc$h22$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Walter wrote:
 "John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
 news:cu6h5v$2tl5$1 digitaldaemon.com...

I think few people in this field fit the stereotypical geek profile

anymore. I do.

He he, well you must be a special, multi-faceted geek then, which makes you even more special than us wannabes. Stereotypical geeks don't jog. I believe you do. Stereotypical geeks don't rebuild novelty cars. That's something you do, isn't it? Walter, as much as you may aspire to it, I'm afraid I can't give you the official seal of stereotypical geekdom. As one of your loyal fans, that can't happen. Yeah, you're a geek, but, sorry, you don't qualify for TV. Ah, but who cares? I guess it really doesn't matter anyway, does it? More than half the people on the list have some sort of geek blood flowing through their veins or they wouldn't be sticking around to see where D goes. Have I dug myself deep enough yet? :-)

I think geeks are, despite obvious social, sexual and hygiene challenges, nice people. I'd rather be marooned on a planet with a few million awkward, ugly, smelly geeks than with 5.2 billions religious zealots intent on killing each other and taking the rest of us along with 'em. :-(
Feb 06 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 15:50:09 +1100, Matthew wrote:

 I think geeks are, despite obvious social, sexual and hygiene 
 challenges, nice people. I'd rather be marooned on a planet with a few 
 million awkward, ugly, smelly geeks than with 5.2 billions religious 
 zealots intent on killing each other and taking the rest of us along 
 with 'em.
 
 :-(

Uh... that's not much of an alternative now is it? I think anyone would make the same choice! You need to make much less severe a comparison to get your point across. :-) It's kind of funny. My own personality is adverse to any social interaction. Strangely I got myself into a job that requires every ounce of grace, manners, and friendliness to maintain a relaxed and approachable atmosphere in situations of complete chaos. I don't know how I've survived. At the end of the day (night?), I'm quite satisfied to sequester myself into quiet surroundings (translated: me and my laptop). Contrary to the social butterfly's affinity for people, I actual find myself slightly exhausted after a day of putting people at ease. It has got easier over the years, though, I admit. :-) So there you go. My geek roots were inborn. - John R.
Feb 06 2005
next sibling parent "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
 On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 15:50:09 +1100, Matthew wrote:

 I think geeks are, despite obvious social, sexual and hygiene
 challenges, nice people. I'd rather be marooned on a planet with a 
 few
 million awkward, ugly, smelly geeks than with 5.2 billions religious
 zealots intent on killing each other and taking the rest of us along
 with 'em.

 :-(

Uh... that's not much of an alternative now is it? I think anyone would make the same choice! You need to make much less severe a comparison to get your point across. :-)

No, it was very poor debating form, I must concede.. Just a few things over the past few days here in Sydney and in the wider world has got me wondering about what a despicable creature we humans are in the main, with a few % exception. It bamboozles me in the extreme that so much ill goes on, primarily in the name of religion and commercial organisations, both of which purport to be for the good of humanity in one perverse way or another. Consider the recent disagreement between Walter and myself. We're completely disagreeing with each other's main perspectives, but yet we can see some of each other's pov, are going to continue working together for the good of D and of our respective causes (Walter's just reviewed the next instalment of my Flexible C++ column, depite me calling some of his posts idiotic, or what not), and remain friends. We're not suspending our plans to write our book as a result of bruised egos, or any such nonsense. Contrast that with the wider geopolitico/religious perspective. We have these hugely powerful religious organisations decreeing that each other (and their attendant / associated innocent populations) are evil. Where's the empathy / insight / intellect? There's none. But even that offers some hope of a balance between evils. Kind of like the cold war's Mutually Assured Destruction. What hope do we have with large commerical organisations, whose interests subsume those of individual people, both within and without the organisation? There's no Warsaw Pact to balance their NATO. It's kind of funny that people have been concerned for about the last 20 years about nano-technology killing us all. IIRC, Bill Joy prophesied the end of humanity a few years ago. It's completely backwards. Mega commercial organisations have developed emergent characteristics that are bad for _all_ people, and will drive humanity to a far more certain death. Too many people. Too few brain cells. I really do worry about the world our kids will grow up in.
 It's kind of funny. My own personality is adverse to any social
 interaction.

He he. You should talk to my wife! :-)
 Strangely I got myself into a job that requires every ounce
 of grace, manners, and friendliness to maintain a relaxed and
 approachable atmosphere in situations of complete chaos. I don't
 know how I've survived.  At the end of the day (night?), I'm quite
 satisfied to sequester myself into quiet surroundings (translated: me 
 and
 my laptop).

I always seem to get on really well with work colleagues. It's family that causes the issues ...
 Contrary to the social butterfly's affinity for people, I actual
 find myself slightly exhausted after a day of putting people at ease. 
 It
 has got easier over the years, though, I admit. :-)

 So there you go.  My geek roots were inborn.

Mine too.
Feb 06 2005
prev sibling parent reply John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 15:50:09 +1100, Matthew wrote:
 
 
I think geeks are, despite obvious social, sexual and hygiene 
challenges, nice people. I'd rather be marooned on a planet with a few 
million awkward, ugly, smelly geeks than with 5.2 billions religious 
zealots intent on killing each other and taking the rest of us along 
with 'em.

:-(


Exactly why I support the priviatization of the space industry!
 It's kind of funny. My own personality is adverse to any social
 interaction.  Strangely I got myself into a job that requires every ounce
 of grace, manners, and friendliness to maintain a relaxed and
 approachable atmosphere in situations of complete chaos. I don't
 know how I've survived.  At the end of the day (night?), I'm quite
 satisfied to sequester myself into quiet surroundings (translated: me and
 my laptop).  
 
 Contrary to the social butterfly's affinity for people, I actual
 find myself slightly exhausted after a day of putting people at ease.  It
 has got easier over the years, though, I admit. :-)
 

Actually, I know I few people on my volunteer EMT squad who are also introverts. Myself included.
Feb 07 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
John Demme wrote:

 
 Actually, I know I few people on my volunteer EMT squad who are also 
 introverts.  Myself included.

Ah well, good to know I'm not the only one. I hear introversion is a not-so-uncommon quality in actors and actresses. Actually, EMT's and actors aren't a whole lot different. ;-)
Feb 07 2005
parent reply John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 John Demme wrote:
 
 Actually, I know I few people on my volunteer EMT squad who are also 
 introverts.  Myself included.

Ah well, good to know I'm not the only one. I hear introversion is a not-so-uncommon quality in actors and actresses. Actually, EMT's and actors aren't a whole lot different. ;-)

If one takes protocol and a script to be similar, I would agree. Of couse I think I'd get some weird looks if, while working on a patient, I suddenly scream, "LINE?!?!"
Feb 07 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
John Demme wrote:
 John Reimer wrote:
 
 John Demme wrote:

 Actually, I know I few people on my volunteer EMT squad who are also 
 introverts.  Myself included.

Ah well, good to know I'm not the only one. I hear introversion is a not-so-uncommon quality in actors and actresses. Actually, EMT's and actors aren't a whole lot different. ;-)

If one takes protocol and a script to be similar, I would agree. Of couse I think I'd get some weird looks if, while working on a patient, I suddenly scream, "LINE?!?!"

He he. No, I wasn't referring to protocols as an analogy. You got to innovate too much in this job for that analogy to hold. The job rarely flows like a script... ha I wish. I don't know what your experience is, but I meant much of the job is an act. You've got to pretend you know exactly what to do, when, in many situations, you actually don't; you have to exude confidence and calm reassurance in situations that are emotional and chaotic. In short, you have to be somebody you are not (at least most people aren't): but since you have the uniform and the badge, people think you've got the answers. Much of it becomes "just an act" for the benefit of public. This doesn't remove the possibility of being genuine, but the uniform and the job dictates that you follow certain procedures that you wouldn't do in plain clothes -- thus... it's a bit of an act. :-) And about the "LINE?!?!" part.. that's not too far from the truth in some of my experiences. Though I wouldn't scream the part, I've had my share of looking pretty confused on the scene. :-) Experience has shown me that the better I can hide that absolute horrible feeling of uncertainty, the better; I "act" like I know what I'm doing in difficult situations (meanwhile my mind cranks away trying to concoct solutions). That's one of the secrets to patient care. The calmer the scene one can maintain, the better the organization and outcome. Protocols may actually have less influence on outcomes than this. Now that everyone knows that's is just an "act", we're ruined.... Oh no! :-D Ah... but this is getting a might bit off topic. Later, John
Feb 07 2005
next sibling parent reply John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 John Demme wrote:
 
 John Reimer wrote:

 John Demme wrote:

 Actually, I know I few people on my volunteer EMT squad who are also 
 introverts.  Myself included.

Ah well, good to know I'm not the only one. I hear introversion is a not-so-uncommon quality in actors and actresses. Actually, EMT's and actors aren't a whole lot different. ;-)

If one takes protocol and a script to be similar, I would agree. Of couse I think I'd get some weird looks if, while working on a patient, I suddenly scream, "LINE?!?!"

He he. No, I wasn't referring to protocols as an analogy. You got to innovate too much in this job for that analogy to hold. The job rarely flows like a script... ha I wish. I don't know what your experience is, but I meant much of the job is an act. You've got to pretend you know exactly what to do, when, in many situations, you actually don't; you have to exude confidence and calm reassurance in situations that are emotional and chaotic. In short, you have to be somebody you are not (at least most people aren't): but since you have the uniform and the badge, people think you've got the answers. Much of it becomes "just an act" for the benefit of public. This doesn't remove the possibility of being genuine, but the uniform and the job dictates that you follow certain procedures that you wouldn't do in plain clothes -- thus... it's a bit of an act. :-) And about the "LINE?!?!" part.. that's not too far from the truth in some of my experiences. Though I wouldn't scream the part, I've had my share of looking pretty confused on the scene. :-) Experience has shown me that the better I can hide that absolute horrible feeling of uncertainty, the better; I "act" like I know what I'm doing in difficult situations (meanwhile my mind cranks away trying to concoct solutions). That's one of the secrets to patient care. The calmer the scene one can maintain, the better the organization and outcome. Protocols may actually have less influence on outcomes than this. Now that everyone knows that's is just an "act", we're ruined.... Oh no! :-D Ah... but this is getting a might bit off topic. Later, John

As for the part about confidence, I find that to be more true about life in general than any specific profession. It's rare that I'm not confident... sometimes I'll be confident that I don't know something, but confident nonetheless. As for protocol vs improv, I agree that improv is the way to go, but in my (admittly short) experience, at home in New Jersey, we are being push to the protocol side. Do we practice that way? Only to an extent, and most interactions with other units. I don't like the way it's heading, but I was told during my initial EMT training, that all EMTs do (officially) is follow protocol. Unfortunate. I wonder if there's some way to relate this to software? John
Feb 07 2005
next sibling parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
John Demme wrote:

 As for the part about confidence, I find that to be more true about life 
 in general than any specific profession.  It's rare that I'm not 
 confident... sometimes I'll be confident that I don't know something, 
 but confident nonetheless.

Well... we'll put that down to a difference in personality. :-) The result is the same, I wager. I used to have an over abundance of confidence, but found being without was much safer for me. I manage things better without it, believe it or not. Of course, the word can be interpreted in more ways than one. Success in my profession is not related necessarily to my confidence level; it's more reflected in my patient's final opinion of me (not necessarily the best measurement; but so far a good one!)
 As for protocol vs improv, I agree that improv is the way to go, but in 
 my (admittly short) experience, at home in New Jersey, we are being push 
 to the protocol side.  Do we practice that way?  Only to an extent, and 
 most interactions with other units.

Protocol /must/ be the final official word. Adhering to it is the only way an EMT protects himself legally. But in the real world, the EMT realizes that he or she must interpret the protocol for the situation because situations don't always allow for the protocols scripted sequence. I prefer to see it as a "guideline" /unofficially/ in that case. As long as I have an explanation for why I did something and as long as I can explain it in terms of a protocol, I've met my goal. I'm safe. There can never be any such thing as "going outside your protocol." If you do, you're in trouble.
 I don't like the way it's heading, but I was told during my initial EMT 
 training, that all EMTs do (officially) is follow protocol.  Unfortunate.

Correct. It has to be that way to protect the technician. That said, different states/provinces/countries do stress these matters differently. So it's wise to stick to what you've been taught. Here, /some/ of our protocols are a little open-ended (they're designed to be that way). People tend to interpret some of them differently. For irresponsible individuals, or those that don't think to deeply, this can be a bad thing.
 I wonder if there's some way to relate this to software?
 
 John

Well, it won't be the first time this newsgroup has drifted off topic, so I don't think we'll be booted for making it into an EMS discussion forum... at least not just yet. :-) - John R.
Feb 07 2005
next sibling parent reply John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 John Demme wrote:
 
 As for the part about confidence, I find that to be more true about 
 life in general than any specific profession.  It's rare that I'm not 
 confident... sometimes I'll be confident that I don't know something, 
 but confident nonetheless.

Well... we'll put that down to a difference in personality. :-) The result is the same, I wager. I used to have an over abundance of confidence, but found being without was much safer for me. I manage things better without it, believe it or not. Of course, the word can be interpreted in more ways than one. Success in my profession is not related necessarily to my confidence level; it's more reflected in my patient's final opinion of me (not necessarily the best measurement; but so far a good one!)
 As for protocol vs improv, I agree that improv is the way to go, but 
 in my (admittly short) experience, at home in New Jersey, we are being 
 push to the protocol side.  Do we practice that way?  Only to an 
 extent, and most interactions with other units.

Protocol /must/ be the final official word. Adhering to it is the only way an EMT protects himself legally. But in the real world, the EMT realizes that he or she must interpret the protocol for the situation because situations don't always allow for the protocols scripted sequence. I prefer to see it as a "guideline" /unofficially/ in that case. As long as I have an explanation for why I did something and as long as I can explain it in terms of a protocol, I've met my goal. I'm safe. There can never be any such thing as "going outside your protocol." If you do, you're in trouble.
 I don't like the way it's heading, but I was told during my initial 
 EMT training, that all EMTs do (officially) is follow protocol.  
 Unfortunate.

Correct. It has to be that way to protect the technician. That said, different states/provinces/countries do stress these matters differently. So it's wise to stick to what you've been taught. Here, /some/ of our protocols are a little open-ended (they're designed to be that way). People tend to interpret some of them differently. For irresponsible individuals, or those that don't think to deeply, this can be a bad thing.
 I wonder if there's some way to relate this to software?

 John

Well, it won't be the first time this newsgroup has drifted off topic, so I don't think we'll be booted for making it into an EMS discussion forum... at least not just yet. :-) - John R.

I think we are in agreement. I'm merely comparing the new style to the old certification. The old way (according to the guys I've talked) was to teach students how to determine the "norm", then determine what's wrong with the patient, then treat the ailment with various treatments also taught. With the newer style (which I was taught) feels much more like treating symptoms. E.G., if the patient has symptoms X,Y,Z, then do A,B,C. This is what I meant by protocol.... procedure is perhaps a better word? Protocol has a slightly different meaning in this field. Of course we /never/ step outside what we are allowed to do. For instance, as an EMT-B, I'm not permitted to start an IV. I never have, and probably never will. John
Feb 07 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
For those unfamiliar with EMS techno speak, I'll be spelling out some of 
the terms here; I know John will probably know them.

John Demme wrote:
 
 
 I think we are in agreement.  I'm merely comparing the new style to the 
 old certification.  The old way (according to the guys I've talked) was 
 to teach students how to determine the "norm", then determine what's 
 wrong with the patient, then treat the ailment with various treatments 
 also taught.

Interesting. I'd say our new way translates something to what your old way was. In the past (>7 years ago) we were told NOT to make a diagnoses on patients: we were to stick to the simple treatment plan (sounds more like what you are talking about with treating the symptoms). We were to make our observations and assessments as best we could and record them appropriately for the benefit of the hospital. The diagnosis belonged to the doctor. Patients were either stable or unstable; this meant the process was (skipping scene assessment) (1) primary survey - quickly assess patient's DABC's (Delicate spine, Airway, Breathing, Circulation) (2) make a transport decision - is patient stable or unstable (3) if stable: "stay and play" - further assess on scene (4) if unstable: initiate transport immediatly -- (the PUFO principle as some people like to put it rather impolitely) (above almost could be put in a programming language format :-) ) One paramedic I highly respect once told a bunch of us: "You can never go wrong by treating every patient with spinal precautions, oxygen, and code 3 to the hospital." He was being facetious, of course, but you get the idea. When I got in the ambulance service about 6.5 years ago, big changes were just starting in our system in BC. Our training levels were considered some of the lowest in Canada at the time; new initiatives were being put in place to make us more competitive again. Along with these initiatives came a new training mentality. The idea was to bring the ALS (Advanced Life Support -- highest level trained paramedics; aka EMT-P's) methodology of assessment to the lower levels. The hope was to make BLS level attendents smarter and sharper, keener to do detective work, more intelligent to make appropriate decisions for the good of the patient (all in theory, of course). We learned to make a quick assessment called a provisional diagnosis on patients (typical a total of 3 good guesses), and then use a functional assessment to recursively update our initial diagnosis (narrow it down as more data was collected on a patient). This model was designed based on research collected on what the "best" paramedics do as part of their natural process. The plan was to finally get the BLS paramedics thinking more carefully instead of just treating signs and symptoms. It's an excellent idea in theory, but unfortunately as some shortcomings. Shortcoming #1 is that in order to get BLS attendants to follow a new process, you have to provide them with a whole lot more knowledge in physiology, pathophysiology, anatomy, and biology, etc. Few of our BLS level's had much training to talk about in those regards because the old system had dragged them through minimal training. So now they have started to try to update those areas too. But doing that is a bit of a shocker for EMT's that have been operating for years with the old methods. They tend to bulk at changes like that. I personally enjoy it immensely, but I'm a guy that wants to keep moving forward to higher levels anyway. For others it was an unreasonable step to more responsibility when they were doing just fine as they were thank you very much. They are enough "keeners" around here though to make that outlook the exception, I think. Note that the new method does implement the above algorithm still. It just integrates the above thought process into the flowchart. Honestly, I found readjusting to the new way somewhat difficult; it's an ongoing learning process but an excellent opportunity to learn the way I'm inclined to learn anyway (instead of being held back by old methods). My conclusion is that the change is excellent, but it's only effective for those EMTs that are keen to learn and extend their skills. It completely confuses everyone else and introduces inaccurate and ineffective care.
 With the newer style (which I was taught) feels much more like treating 
 symptoms.  E.G., if the patient has symptoms X,Y,Z, then do A,B,C.  This 
 is what I meant by protocol.... procedure is perhaps a better word? 
 Protocol has a slightly different meaning in this field.

That style still works. Protocol is an appropriate term, and we still use them with our "new" model (we'll always use them). I usually think of procedure to mean "a trained mechanical skill often associated with a protocol: cricothyrotomy, needle thorocentesis, tracheal intubation, iv initiation, Bag-valve mask etc). Our new system encourages a whole lot more thinking about the patient's condition. The protocol is more a guideline now than it ever used to be, so I guess that was my perspective when I was going on about it in my last post. The idea is to make sure we learn to identify patients that are having CHF, cardiac-type chest pain, asthma, COPD, etc. and treat them appropriately. Eg... we don't want to give Sabutamol to a CHF patient, mistaking their condition for asthma, pneumonia, or even possibly COPD (though many COPD patient's typically have CHF as part of the disease -- that's called a "complex case"). The idea is to think more carefully before giving a drug that could possibly cause disastrous results on the patient. In this case, Sabutomol could worsen the CHF if we gave it to a patient that had that ailment.
 Of course we /never/ step outside what we are allowed to do.  For 
 instance, as an EMT-B, I'm not permitted to start an IV.  I never have, 
 and probably never will.
 
 John

IV's have been added and removed a couple times in our system. They are now being approved here for the BLS level (They were available for years until just after I got hired, then no new people were allowed to get the training). It's been a long debated topic here about whether BLS level EMT's should be allowed to have the skill. I'm just glad we're getting it now because I've had so many situations where the skill would have been practical, useful, and the obvious part of a definitive treatment plan. Case in point: we are called Code 3 to a 14 year old Diabetic Type I. I arrive at the house. The kid's unconcious. BGL if I recall correctly was < 2.0 mmol/L. Mom asks if we can do IV. I, secretly frustrated beyond belief, say "no", knowing D10W IV will bring this kid right out of it; all I can give him is oral glucose which isn't a safe thing to give him in his current level of consciousness (semi-prone and a bit in the bucal mucose doesn't do much). She wonders out loud, "why did I call you guys then? I might as well have brought him to the hospital myself"; I agree with her how stupid it is, specifically the politics of the service. Even worse, if one of our senior employees had been along (who got the IV training from way back, with the appropriate protocol), the kid would have got the treatment he needed. We bring the kid to the hospital (not that short of a trip). IV in. Kid fixed. Me more frustrated. This kid was put in more danger by extending the time his brain was going without glucose. That's finally getting fixed now. I guess the committees finally realized we had to start competing with the rest of Canada. Politics never end on these things. I know some places in the States where BLS do a whole lot more than I do. It's wierd. But that's the way it goes, right? And how does all this tie in to D programming? Well, I like what both you and Matthew had to say about. Many systems have protocols, and procedures are implemented for a purpose. They are in place to solve problems and implement structure within a realm of common patterns. It's really quite fascinating how so many systems approach problems in similar ways. Whew! Was that long winded... I might give Matthew a run for his money! (he he... but he writes better) ;-) - John R.
Feb 07 2005
parent reply John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 Interesting. I'd say our new way translates something to what your old 
 way was.  In the past (>7 years ago) we were told NOT to make a 
 diagnoses on patients: we were to stick to the simple treatment plan 
 (sounds more like what you are talking about with treating the 
 symptoms).  We were to make our observations and assessments as best we 
 could and record them appropriately for the benefit of the hospital. The 
 diagnosis belonged to the doctor.  Patients were either stable or 
 unstable; this meant the process was (skipping scene assessment)
 

Your old way sounds exactly like our new way. Much like yourself, I prefer (and usually do better) with your newer way.
 
 
 
 IV's have been added and removed a couple times in our system.  They are 
 now being approved here for the BLS level (They were available for years 
 until just after I got hired, then no new people were allowed to get the 
 training). It's been a long debated topic here about whether BLS level 
 EMT's should be allowed to have the skill.  I'm just glad we're getting 
 it now because I've had so many situations where the skill would have 
 been practical, useful, and the obvious part of a definitive treatment 
 plan.
 
 Case in point:  we are called Code 3 to a 14 year old Diabetic Type I. I 
 arrive at the house. The kid's unconcious.  BGL if I recall correctly 
  was < 2.0 mmol/L.  Mom asks if we can do IV.  I, secretly frustrated 
 beyond belief, say "no", knowing D10W IV will bring this kid right out 
 of it; all I can give him is oral glucose which isn't a safe thing to 
 give him in his current level of consciousness (semi-prone and a bit in 
 the bucal mucose doesn't do much).  She wonders out loud, "why did I 
 call you guys then? I might as well have brought him to the hospital 
 myself"; I agree with her how stupid it is, specifically the politics of 
 the service.  Even worse, if one of our senior employees had been along 
 (who got the IV training from way back, with the appropriate protocol), 
 the kid would have got the treatment he needed.  We bring the kid to the 
 hospital (not that short of a trip).  IV in. Kid fixed.  Me more 
 frustrated.  This kid was put in more danger by extending the time his 
 brain was going without glucose.
 
 That's finally getting fixed now.  I guess the committees finally 
 realized we had to start competing with the rest of Canada.  Politics 
 never end on these things.  I know some places in the States where BLS 
 do a whole lot more than I do. It's wierd.
 

Don't get me started on restrictions in New Jersey... I guess it's that way since ALS is usually only about 15-20 minutes away. We can't even have any ALS on our squads. If one of the paramedics we have on the squad gets on scene, and the patient needs an IV, or to be intubated, our /trained/ EMT-P cannot do it until the other (paid and on the clock) paramedics get there and give permission for our guy to /help/. It's pathetic. And on top of all this, NJ EMT-B's (the only type we can have on local squads*) are basically only allowed to do CPR, and apply oxygen. (There's a lot more we can do for trauma.) We can't intubate, oxygen is the only drug we can give, besides oral glucose (but I can't remember whether or not this is considered a drug.) Hell, if the patient has an Eppi-Pen, technically, we can't administer it! Sometimes you feel pretty useless. *Actually, EMT-P's are allowed on the squads, but they are EMT-B certified, and can only practice the EMT-B level stuff. John
Feb 08 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
John Demme wrote:

 
 Don't get me started on restrictions in New Jersey... I guess it's that 
 way since ALS is usually only about 15-20 minutes away.  We can't even 
 have any ALS on our squads.  If one of the paramedics we have on the 
 squad gets on scene, and the patient needs an IV, or to be intubated, 
 our /trained/ EMT-P cannot do it until the other (paid and on the clock) 
 paramedics get there and give permission for our guy to /help/.  It's 
 pathetic.
 
 And on top of all this, NJ EMT-B's (the only type we can have on local 
 squads*) are basically only allowed to do CPR, and apply oxygen. 
 (There's a lot more we can do for trauma.)  We can't intubate, oxygen is 
 the only drug we can give, besides oral glucose (but I can't remember 
 whether or not this is considered a drug.)  Hell, if the patient has an 
 Eppi-Pen, technically, we can't administer it!
 
 Sometimes you feel pretty useless.
 
 *Actually, EMT-P's are allowed on the squads, but they are EMT-B 
 certified, and can only practice the EMT-B level stuff.
 
 John

I hear you. The politics of these things are pretty annoying. Our system does not permit ALS to practice anywhere but in the bigger centers (the idea is that high call volume areas are the only areas where they can maintain expertise in their advanced skills). In our case, that means we have no ALS within 2+ hours of us. So they aren't a resource that is even considered. That's probably one reason that the powers that be decided to give IV's back to our BLS crowd. Once in awhile, for really bad accidents, they'll try to send a helicopter from one of those centers with an ALS crew on board, but that still takes time. I started to work toward an ACP level of training last year (Advanced Care Paramedic = new ALS accreditation), took the tough pre-ACP 3 month course (required before entry), passed the written with high marks, but got stalled for the time being after a botched practical assessment :-( (they have pretty strict entry requirements here: I came ill-prepared for the "practical exam"/"oral interview" which is akin to the 2nd part of a 3 step interview process; very frustrating; I'll likely try again later after I have more money). In the past, I would not have been allowed to enter the course without having worked in a high call-volume center for 3+ years. Times are changing here for the better, though. The province right next to us, Alberta, operates much more like the US in many regards. There, ALS trained crews are much more common, even in small population areas, so response times of these crews are closer to the 10-15 minute mark. It's a strange world out there. Different organisations seem to use opposite solutions for the same problems. It's a wonder how these things actually can work. We are still in transition, but here are training levels and what they are able to do: EMR -> Emergency Medical Responder (entry level Attendent) O2, AED, Spinal management, BP, assist Nitro (patient's), CPR, and other first aid oriented stuff PCP -> Primary Care Paramedic aka Paramedic 1 (my current level) New standard here: All EMR skills plus these drugs and skills: Salbutomol, Epinephrine (for anaphylaxis only), Narcan, Nitroglycerin (for cardiac chest pain), oral glucose, Glucagon, O2, Entonox, SC injections, (soon IM injections). No intubation at present. NEW: Thiamine, D10W, IV starts (for hypoglycemia, hypovolemia, NYD, and narcotic overdoses). There's a several assessment skills that are also part of this level like chest auscultation... etc. ACP -> Advance Care Paramedic aka Paramedic 3 or EMA III. New ALS standard. Huge list of Advanced emergency drugs and procedures. BC has some of the highest trained ALS levels. Also the hardest to get in or pass the entry requirements, darn! :-(. - John R.
Feb 09 2005
parent John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
Here, EMT-Bs are basically your EMRs with oral glucose, and a few of the
assesment techniques of your PCP.  Of course without more advanced treatments, a
lot of the assesment techniques are frequently useless.  Who care's what he's
got and why if all you can do is apply O2 and drive?  Since our squad can't
practice anything more advanced, lately I've been feeling like (on medical
calls, not trauma) that we're mostly just triage.  Either the patient needs
medics, or the patient needs to call a cab... I frequently joke that we should
just paint the rigs yellow with black checkers.

We used to have an EMT-I certification similar to your PCP, but they got rid of
that unfortunately.

John

In article <cuchvj$1rlt$1 digitaldaemon.com>, John Reimer says...
John Demme wrote:

 
 Don't get me started on restrictions in New Jersey... I guess it's that 
 way since ALS is usually only about 15-20 minutes away.  We can't even 
 have any ALS on our squads.  If one of the paramedics we have on the 
 squad gets on scene, and the patient needs an IV, or to be intubated, 
 our /trained/ EMT-P cannot do it until the other (paid and on the clock) 
 paramedics get there and give permission for our guy to /help/.  It's 
 pathetic.
 
 And on top of all this, NJ EMT-B's (the only type we can have on local 
 squads*) are basically only allowed to do CPR, and apply oxygen. 
 (There's a lot more we can do for trauma.)  We can't intubate, oxygen is 
 the only drug we can give, besides oral glucose (but I can't remember 
 whether or not this is considered a drug.)  Hell, if the patient has an 
 Eppi-Pen, technically, we can't administer it!
 
 Sometimes you feel pretty useless.
 
 *Actually, EMT-P's are allowed on the squads, but they are EMT-B 
 certified, and can only practice the EMT-B level stuff.
 
 John

I hear you. The politics of these things are pretty annoying. Our system does not permit ALS to practice anywhere but in the bigger centers (the idea is that high call volume areas are the only areas where they can maintain expertise in their advanced skills). In our case, that means we have no ALS within 2+ hours of us. So they aren't a resource that is even considered. That's probably one reason that the powers that be decided to give IV's back to our BLS crowd. Once in awhile, for really bad accidents, they'll try to send a helicopter from one of those centers with an ALS crew on board, but that still takes time. I started to work toward an ACP level of training last year (Advanced Care Paramedic = new ALS accreditation), took the tough pre-ACP 3 month course (required before entry), passed the written with high marks, but got stalled for the time being after a botched practical assessment :-( (they have pretty strict entry requirements here: I came ill-prepared for the "practical exam"/"oral interview" which is akin to the 2nd part of a 3 step interview process; very frustrating; I'll likely try again later after I have more money). In the past, I would not have been allowed to enter the course without having worked in a high call-volume center for 3+ years. Times are changing here for the better, though. The province right next to us, Alberta, operates much more like the US in many regards. There, ALS trained crews are much more common, even in small population areas, so response times of these crews are closer to the 10-15 minute mark. It's a strange world out there. Different organisations seem to use opposite solutions for the same problems. It's a wonder how these things actually can work. We are still in transition, but here are training levels and what they are able to do: EMR -> Emergency Medical Responder (entry level Attendent) O2, AED, Spinal management, BP, assist Nitro (patient's), CPR, and other first aid oriented stuff PCP -> Primary Care Paramedic aka Paramedic 1 (my current level) New standard here: All EMR skills plus these drugs and skills: Salbutomol, Epinephrine (for anaphylaxis only), Narcan, Nitroglycerin (for cardiac chest pain), oral glucose, Glucagon, O2, Entonox, SC injections, (soon IM injections). No intubation at present. NEW: Thiamine, D10W, IV starts (for hypoglycemia, hypovolemia, NYD, and narcotic overdoses). There's a several assessment skills that are also part of this level like chest auscultation... etc. ACP -> Advance Care Paramedic aka Paramedic 3 or EMA III. New ALS standard. Huge list of Advanced emergency drugs and procedures. BC has some of the highest trained ALS levels. Also the hardest to get in or pass the entry requirements, darn! :-(. - John R.

Feb 09 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
 As for the part about confidence, I find that to be more true about 
 life in general than any specific profession.  It's rare that I'm not 
 confident... sometimes I'll be confident that I don't know something, 
 but confident nonetheless.


Sorry to <snip> the rest, but I wanted to just say: IMX, the smarter and wiser someone is, or has become, the greater their appreciation for their ignorance. Mike Gunderloy was nice enough to review IC++ (http://www.adtmag.com/blogs/devcentral/blog.asp?id=10458) and said that "Matthew Wilson is ... fearsomely knowledgable about C++". It made me both blush and laugh. I'll tell you why. The late '90s was a time when C++ knowledge was more highly prized than perhaps it is now, and it's certainly the case that the language was younger and there was less of the upper-echelon (TMP anyone??) than now abounds. I can remember how, with (in hindsight) mortifying hubris, I used to think that there couldn't be more than a few dozen people on earth who knew more C++ than I did. I look back on the code I used to write then and am very embarassed. If I had under my care someone producing that stuff, I'd be giving them an intense remedial course in both C++ practice and professional ethics. I'd also make them read "The Art of UNIX Programming", with particular focus on the principles of simplicity and discoverability, at the least. Furthermore, in terms of the scope of what I then knew about C++, my sentiment was utterly absurd. I knew barely any generics, didn't really comprehend the C++ object model particularly well, and knew far less about portability than I do now. I now *know* that I'm not all-knowing on C++. Indeed, it's still the case that I am constantly surprised at what I don't know. I don't know how many people there are who know more than C++ than I do, but I'm pretty confident it's four or more figures, and not 2! However, ..., the counterpoint to this is that I have learned an appropriate interpretation of confidence in my practice of C++. I know now that, by dint of will, experience and the almost infinite variety of capabilities of this strange language, that I can make C++ do almost anything I dream up. I now think that the specifics of a language, and any attendant langauge lawyering, are far less important than a person's desire, intent, dedication, pride in their work and, importantly, perspective on their own skills. Furthermore, I now know that it's just as important to have access to people more knowledgable and/or experienced than oneself. We are fortunate in this group that both criteria are amply satisfied.
 Well, it won't be the first time this newsgroup has drifted off topic, 
 so I don't think we'll be booted for making it into an EMS discussion 
 forum... at least not just yet. :-)

No fear! It's interesting to read about the lives of people with different experiences. I hope that this characteristic of the Digital Mars newsgroups never changes. Cheers :-) Matthew
Feb 07 2005
parent John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Matthew wrote:

<snip>

 I now think that the specifics of a language, and any attendant langauge 
 lawyering, are far less important than a person's desire, intent, 
 dedication, pride in their work and, importantly, perspective on their 
 own skills. Furthermore, I now know that it's just as important to have 
 access to people more knowledgable and/or experienced than oneself. We 
 are fortunate in this group that both criteria are amply satisfied.
 

Absolutely true! Your description echos many of my thoughts. Different professions have more in common than we realize.
Well, it won't be the first time this newsgroup has drifted off topic, 
so I don't think we'll be booted for making it into an EMS discussion 
forum... at least not just yet. :-)

No fear! It's interesting to read about the lives of people with different experiences. I hope that this characteristic of the Digital Mars newsgroups never changes.

Wonderful! The flood comes. :-) - John R.
Feb 07 2005
prev sibling parent reply pragma <pragma_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cu90sj$1e0s$2 digitaldaemon.com>, John Demme says...
As for protocol vs improv, I agree that improv is the way to go, but in 
my (admittly short) experience, at home in New Jersey, we are being push 
to the protocol side.  Do we practice that way?  Only to an extent, and 
most interactions with other units.

I don't like the way it's heading, but I was told during my initial EMT 
training, that all EMTs do (officially) is follow protocol.  Unfortunate.

I wonder if there's some way to relate this to software?

Absolutely there is. I feel that every programmer here, from novice to expert, can acknowledge that sometimes your bookshelf will fail (if not outright betray) you. At some point, all that study, experience and peparation boils down to how well you can improvise a good solution to the problem. After all, I doubt we'd all be in this if there wasn't *some* kind of creative element involved here. I'd like to think that being an EMT has a certain "MacGuyver" feel to it. I know that engineering certainly does. :) Now perhaps this a bit too mechanistic for some folks, but the human body is basically a wonderfully complicated machine. I'll add that its so "perfect" that it doesn't run without fault but has built-in fault protection... like D! To add to this relationship, an anesthesiologist friend of mine tends to draw parallels between patient treatment and hacking his G5. So like software engineering, medical treatment of most forms involves the same basic skills: - Understanding a complex web of interacting parts/systems - Identifying where the problem is (and what if possible) - Applying a proven or improvised solution - Knowing when a problem is unsolvable Now in the workplace, the protocol vs intuition bit is a big issue. Take a look at the Capability Maturity Model for example. It basically says that in order to progress as a software engineering team, you must adopt rigid controls in order to mitigate risk, error and ultimately achieve reasonable timelines and deliveries. http://www.emoxie.com/whitepapers/CMMandISO9001-v2.html Now, what does CMM have to do with being an EMT? The model drives home the notion that relying on "Heroes" is fine for a start, but you need to not rely upon superstar talent in order to have repeatable success. I immediately thought of this concept when you mentioned your boss' words. For an EMT, in order to mitigate risk of litigation and loss of life, strict protocols and procedures are needed to maintain an acceptable standard of service. http://www.ee.ryerson.ca:8080/~elf/hack/heroes.html (I'm also a former boy-scout, so I'm familiar with basic first aid. I remember becomming CPR certified a decade ago, and all the rules that come with it; and that was just for "patient has no breathing and maybe a pulse". But I can only imagine what being trained for gunshots wounds, auto accidents, massive burns, deep knife wounds, severe head trauma, field triage, et al. would entail. ::shudder::) The good thing is that in both fields one can acknowledge that while *depending* on heroics isn't a good idea, such talent is always a boon to business. - EricAnderton at yahoo
Feb 07 2005
next sibling parent John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
pragma wrote:
 I'd like to think that being an EMT has a certain "MacGuyver" feel to it.  I
 know that engineering certainly does. :)

I'd like to think that as well, unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately for the patient) it's not quite like that. As John said, we are /very/ responsible for our actions. Brings to mind a story I was told wherein the first EMT to the scene did an emergency tracheostomy... with his pen knife. As I recall, he saved the patient's life, but got the boot. John
Feb 07 2005
prev sibling parent John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
pragma wrote:
 In article <cu90sj$1e0s$2 digitaldaemon.com>, John Demme says...
 
As for protocol vs improv, I agree that improv is the way to go, but in 
my (admittly short) experience, at home in New Jersey, we are being push 
to the protocol side.  Do we practice that way?  Only to an extent, and 
most interactions with other units.

I don't like the way it's heading, but I was told during my initial EMT 
training, that all EMTs do (officially) is follow protocol.  Unfortunate.

I wonder if there's some way to relate this to software?

Absolutely there is. I feel that every programmer here, from novice to expert, can acknowledge that sometimes your bookshelf will fail (if not outright betray) you. At some point, all that study, experience and peparation boils down to how well you can improvise a good solution to the problem. After all, I doubt we'd all be in this if there wasn't *some* kind of creative element involved here.

Agreed. Improvising is hugely important.
 I'd like to think that being an EMT has a certain "MacGuyver" feel to it.  I
 know that engineering certainly does. :)

Actually, you are correct when it comes to some things in the EMT field. Although we don't typically improvise our protocols much without dire consequences as John Demme noted; for example if I must stick to a protocol's strictly stated drug dosages, or I could lose my job. Some instances demand that I contact a physician to request repeat orders, though. So there is somewhat of a safety net there. But improvisation is hugely important in the EMT field when it comes to everyday mechanics. What do I do if I don't have the required equipment for the job? What if I can't stop this bleed with what I've got with me? How do I get this patient out of that vehicle without causing further injury? Where do I hang this IV bag? How do I move this 300 lb woman without straining my back? How do I determine a patient's weight to give the correct drug dose? There are tons of opportunities to be a "MacGuyver" here. Thinking smart, thinking efficiently is a huge asset to the job as I'm sure it is for almost any other. I love working with people that have a natural talent for such things.
 Now perhaps this a bit too mechanistic for some folks, but the human body is
 basically a wonderfully complicated machine. I'll add that its so "perfect"
that
 it doesn't run without fault but has built-in fault protection... like D! 
 
 To add to this relationship, an anesthesiologist friend of mine tends to draw
 parallels between patient treatment and hacking his G5.  
 
 So like software engineering, medical treatment of most forms involves the same
 basic skills: 
 
 - Understanding a complex web of interacting parts/systems
 - Identifying where the problem is (and what if possible)
 - Applying a proven or improvised solution
 - Knowing when a problem is unsolvable
 
 Now in the workplace, the protocol vs intuition bit is a big issue.  Take a
look
 at the Capability Maturity Model for example.  It basically says that in order
 to progress as a software engineering team, you must adopt rigid controls in
 order to mitigate risk, error and ultimately achieve reasonable timelines and
 deliveries.  
 
 http://www.emoxie.com/whitepapers/CMMandISO9001-v2.html
 
 Now, what does CMM have to do with being an EMT?  The model drives home the
 notion that relying on "Heroes" is fine for a start, but you need to not rely
 upon superstar talent in order to have repeatable success.  I immediately
 thought of this concept when you mentioned your boss' words.  For an EMT, in
 order to mitigate risk of litigation and loss of life, strict protocols and
 procedures are needed to maintain an acceptable standard of service.  
 
 http://www.ee.ryerson.ca:8080/~elf/hack/heroes.html
 
 (I'm also a former boy-scout, so I'm familiar with basic first aid.  I remember
 becomming CPR certified a decade ago, and all the rules that come with it; and
 that was just for "patient has no breathing and maybe a pulse".  But I can only
 imagine what being trained for gunshots wounds, auto accidents, massive burns,
 deep knife wounds, severe head trauma, field triage, et al. would entail.
 ::shudder::)

It get's interesting fast, yes. :-) It's amazing what the mind gets used to when it comes across enough of those sort of things.
 The good thing is that in both fields one can acknowledge that while
*depending*
 on heroics isn't a good idea, such talent is always a boon to business.
 
 - EricAnderton at yahoo

Thanks for that read. It was an excellent description and comparison. Very accurate and germane. - John R.
Feb 07 2005
prev sibling parent "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 
 ...
 
 Now that everyone knows that's is just an "act", we're ruined.... Oh no! 
 :-D
 

I don't think I'll ever go to a hospital again.... lol... _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 07 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:cu6rbc$h22$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Walter wrote:
 "John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
 news:cu6h5v$2tl5$1 digitaldaemon.com...

I think few people in this field fit the stereotypical geek profile



 I do.

He he, well you must be a special, multi-faceted geek then, which makes you even more special than us wannabes. Stereotypical geeks don't jog. I believe you do.

I do. It's the only activity I do. I basically stink at any and all sports, picked last for the team, even the eye doctor opined that I must be terrible at baseball. The only picture of me at little league is me striking out. I tried weightlifting for a couple years. Nothing happened.
 Stereotypical geeks don't rebuild novelty cars.  That's something you
 do, isn't it?

I'm not sure I'd call a muscle car a novelty car, but there ya go. It's basically all in pieces right now. I'm back into it after a 20 year hiatus following a huge crash that nearly ended me. I've attached a picture of my half-done cylinder head. Woo-hoo!
 Walter, as much as you may aspire to it, I'm afraid I can't give you the
 official seal of stereotypical geekdom.

Bald. Thick glasses. I used to wear a calculator on my belt. Can't get more geeky than that. I come from a long line of geeks, my grandfather's seminal picture is him with his telescope. My favorite t-shirt has Maxwell's Equations written on it.
 As one of your loyal fans, that
 can't happen. Yeah, you're a geek, but, sorry, you don't qualify for TV.

I tried out for The Apprentice, telling them on the application that they needed a nerd to balance out the show. I didn't get a call :-)
 Ah, but who cares?

It used to bother me being a nerd. But hey, it's what I am.
 I guess it really doesn't matter anyway, does it?

Nope.
Feb 06 2005
next sibling parent John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Walter wrote:

He he, well you must be a special, multi-faceted geek then, which makes
you even more special than us wannabes.

Stereotypical geeks don't jog. I believe you do.

I do. It's the only activity I do. I basically stink at any and all sports, picked last for the team, even the eye doctor opined that I must be terrible at baseball. The only picture of me at little league is me striking out. I tried weightlifting for a couple years. Nothing happened.

Well... It's very rare for a person to have talent in every facet of life. Running /is/ one of those things almost anybody can do if they are determined enough. That's what I like about it. The biggest impediment for most people is the commitment and consistancy it requires. You seem to have the required commitment ingrained into your nature... dmc and dmd are good examples. I don't know how you do it.
 
Stereotypical geeks don't rebuild novelty cars.  That's something you
do, isn't it?

I'm not sure I'd call a muscle car a novelty car, but there ya go. It's basically all in pieces right now. I'm back into it after a 20 year hiatus following a huge crash that nearly ended me. I've attached a picture of my half-done cylinder head. Woo-hoo!

Oops. Unfortunately, I know little about muscle or novelty cars. So they're pratically the same to me :-(. But I certainly can appreciate the intricate detail required for that kind of hobby. The extent of my construction skills includes some model airplanes and a few electronic circuits. I /have/ inherited an impressive ability to break things, though.
Walter, as much as you may aspire to it, I'm afraid I can't give you the
official seal of stereotypical geekdom.

Bald. Thick glasses. I used to wear a calculator on my belt. Can't get more geeky than that. I come from a long line of geeks, my grandfather's seminal picture is him with his telescope. My favorite t-shirt has Maxwell's Equations written on it.

Heh... my Dad's got the bald head and glasses now too. No calculator on his belt, though... well, on second thought, does a PDA count? He does wear that on his belt. He's an ex-US Marine (late 1960s era) :-). But he does work as a laboratory manager now. His solution for the bald head is to shave his hair really tight so it just looks like he's bald on purpose :-). It actually suits him.
As one of your loyal fans, that
can't happen. Yeah, you're a geek, but, sorry, you don't qualify for TV.

I tried out for The Apprentice, telling them on the application that they needed a nerd to balance out the show. I didn't get a call :-)

He, he... The Apprentice is the one with that Trump guy, isn't it? I always get annoyed with those shows... can't watch them too long. I can't stand seeing people being manipulated simply at the whim of a big somebody.
Ah, but who cares?

It used to bother me being a nerd. But hey, it's what I am.
I guess it really doesn't matter anyway, does it?

Nope.

Okay... I'll try to refrain from any rediculous flattery: I met you in person for the first time at the Northwest C++ Users' Group meeting last year. All I can say is that you are a very genuine and eloquent person. It was an honor to be able to shake your hand and listen to your lecture (For those not present, Walter literaly got pummeled with questions there: I've seen few people handle such a situation so adeptly -- hard questions too!). I was also impressed by your frank honesty. There's not many people like that. You'll have to forgive me if I was little awkward myself; like I said, I'm not a huge socializer; sometimes I resign myself to the bear minimum of interaction. It's a stretch for me to show up at things like that, but it was well worth the trip and a pleasure to meet you. Next time we meet, I'll have to get your signature in a newly published /D Programming Distilled/. :-) All the best, - John R.
Feb 07 2005
prev sibling parent John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
Walter wrote:

 
 I'm not sure I'd call a muscle car a novelty car, but there ya go. It's
 basically all in pieces right now. I'm back into it after a 20 year hiatus
 following a huge crash that nearly ended me. I've attached a picture of my
 half-done cylinder head. Woo-hoo!
 

Nice cylinder head! That looks like fun!
Feb 07 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
 Walter wrote:
 
 "John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
 news:cu6h5v$2tl5$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 I think few people in this field fit the stereotypical geek profile

anymore. I do.

He he, well you must be a special, multi-faceted geek then, which makes you even more special than us wannabes. Stereotypical geeks don't jog. I believe you do. Stereotypical geeks don't rebuild novelty cars. That's something you do, isn't it? Walter, as much as you may aspire to it, I'm afraid I can't give you the official seal of stereotypical geekdom. As one of your loyal fans, that can't happen. Yeah, you're a geek, but, sorry, you don't qualify for TV. Ah, but who cares? I guess it really doesn't matter anyway, does it? More than half the people on the list have some sort of geek blood flowing through their veins or they wouldn't be sticking around to see where D goes. Have I dug myself deep enough yet? :-) - John R.

I don't like to think I'm a geek. Not because I think it's a bad thing, but because the world we've created is full so many different things that just sticking to typical geek stuff doesn't make much sense to me (sorry to whoever feels affected by that). However, I must agree with John in that there's a bit of "geek-ness" in most of us, me in particular. The real problem with that is what Matthew said: that we human beings are so stupid to understand and accept each other. So, if we've chosen to be geeks, what's wrong with that? I went to the beach with my family. I really like the beach: I like the sun, the sand, the sea, the food and the girls. But I don't like it when it's too crowded, like this past weekend (being carnival, there were the usual dose of tourists. Although some people were scared for the possibility of a tsunami). I much prefer to have peace and truly rest (which is different to "rest in peace"). However, against what I already know, I went out at night for the usual "Wild On" stuff. But I didn't enjoy it (it was not that bad, but it wasn't good either). I can't remember a single time when I went out at night and actually had a really good time. Due to that, many times I've chosen not to go, and people find that weird, think I'm crazy, think I'm a bored person. Why? Just because we find fun in different things?. I like sports, I like music, I like movies, I like TV. Most people like those things too: let's have fun with that. But I also like to be at home and I don't like crowds. Is that a bad thing? Am I/are we freaks who should be sent to another planet and leave the "normal" ones here? That's were the problem is: after I don't know how many thousands of years of being at the top of the world, we still don't know how (or don't want) to accept that, while being the same, we are different and can't just force the rest to be like us. "Diversity of opinions is important: that's what make horse-racing possible". _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 07 2005
parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:cu9eh5$26nj$2 digitaldaemon.com...
 John Reimer wrote:
 Walter wrote:

 "John Reimer" <brk_6502 yahoo.com> wrote in message
 news:cu6h5v$2tl5$1 digitaldaemon.com...

 I think few people in this field fit the stereotypical geek profile

anymore. I do.

He he, well you must be a special, multi-faceted geek then, which makes you even more special than us wannabes. Stereotypical geeks don't jog. I believe you do. Stereotypical geeks don't rebuild novelty cars. That's something you do, isn't it? Walter, as much as you may aspire to it, I'm afraid I can't give you the official seal of stereotypical geekdom. As one of your loyal fans, that can't happen. Yeah, you're a geek, but, sorry, you don't qualify for TV. Ah, but who cares? I guess it really doesn't matter anyway, does it? More than half the people on the list have some sort of geek blood flowing through their veins or they wouldn't be sticking around to see where D goes. Have I dug myself deep enough yet? :-) - John R.

I don't like to think I'm a geek. Not because I think it's a bad thing, but because the world we've created is full so many different things that just sticking to typical geek stuff doesn't make much sense to me (sorry to whoever feels affected by that). However, I must agree with John in that there's a bit of "geek-ness" in most of us, me in particular. The real problem with that is what Matthew said: that we human beings are so stupid to understand and accept each other. So, if we've chosen to be geeks, what's wrong with that? I went to the beach with my family. I really like the beach: I like the sun, the sand, the sea, the food and the girls. But I don't like it when it's too crowded, like this past weekend (being carnival, there were the usual dose of tourists. Although some people were scared for the possibility of a tsunami). I much prefer to have peace and truly rest (which is different to "rest in peace"). However, against what I already know, I went out at night for the usual "Wild On" stuff. But I didn't enjoy it (it was not that bad, but it wasn't good either). I can't remember a single time when I went out at night and actually had a really good time. Due to that, many times I've chosen not to go, and people find that weird, think I'm crazy, think I'm a bored person. Why? Just because we find fun in different things?. I like sports, I like music, I like movies, I like TV. Most people like those things too: let's have fun with that. But I also like to be at home and I don't like crowds. Is that a bad thing? Am I/are we freaks who should be sent to another planet and leave the "normal" ones here? That's were the problem is: after I don't know how many thousands of years of being at the top of the world, we still don't know how (or don't want) to accept that, while being the same, we are different and can't just force the rest to be like us. "Diversity of opinions is important: that's what make horse-racing possible".

Very interesting, and well put. Especially the bit about agreeing with me! LOL! (SHOHWL) Matthew FYI: It's a new one: Smacks Himself On Head With Laptop.
Feb 07 2005
parent "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Matthew wrote:
 
 Very interesting, and well put.
 

Thanks. How about me becoming a writer? .... Nah, who would buy a book written by a geek, except other geeks? :D
 Especially the bit about agreeing with me! LOL! (SHOHWL)
 
 Matthew
 
 FYI: It's a new one: Smacks Himself On Head With Laptop.
 
 

_______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 08 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Brian Chapman <nospam-for-brian see-post-for-address.net> writes:
On 2005-02-03 18:31:55 -0600, "Carlos Santander B." 
<csantander619 gmail.com> said:

 Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could run 
 the introductions again.

Name: Brian Age: 29 I'm a looser whose is hopelessly obsessed with game programming. Not playing games so much anymore. Mostly just programming them. Also dig the demoscene big time, but I'm too lame to make my own demos. I'd rather work on game stuff. Anyway, I originally taught myself programming in C with DJGPP in MSDOS. But before that I'd have to say my first real programming was HyperScript for HyperCard on the Mac Plus System 6 old skool! Awwe-yea! Can I get a show of hands? *nobody moves*..hehe. Okay, maybe I did some BASIC in grade school and at my grandparents house when I got bored. But HyperScript was what introduced me to the important concepts. Events, flow control, functions, algorithms, etc...oh yes...that blocky keyboard, that one button mouse, that tiny black and white monitor, down in the basement with my HyperScript programming reference...ah, the memories. So at some point I went to college for awhile and had to correct the teachers all the time and explain to the graduates what simple things like hash tables were. No kidding. It sucked. Not to mention, their idea of a test was having you vomit man pages and if you forgot one little argument to some useless utility then you didn't get an A. Since I don't care about stupid things like that I didn't get A's. I still have yet to complete my degree. Anyway, eventually I hope to find a place where I fit in and doesn't suck. D shows a lot of promise for not sucking. So it looks like a good start. Maybe I'll have a game/tech demo or something out soon. Working with SDL, OpenGL, and ODE among other things. Wanna talk about Legacy data! My favorite coding font is the same one I've always used way back from my Win16 Boraland C++ compiler: "borte.fon". You can still find it on the net if you search for it. Not only do I still use it now under Windows XP, but I've converted it to .bdf and use it under X11 on Linux and Mac OS X. After all this time it still totally ownz. I hate coding with the worlds default font: "courier.ttf". Yeah I think everyone needs to find a good personal coding font! ;-)
Feb 07 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Lynn Allan" <l_d_allan adelphia.net> writes:
 I also started the Apollo library, which is
 supposed to be a GUI library built over the Borland VCL using Delphi

 However, my (never ending) lack of time hasn't allowed me to go any
 further, and I don't think there's much interest on it because the
 Delphi 6 Personal Edition (the one I have) doesn't allow to use it

 commercial applications. Besides that, a couple of uni projects, but
 mainly personal thingies.

Just wondering ... can D actually use Delphi VCL components? Directly or indirectly? I tried to find Apollo, but the link was dead http://earth.prohosting.com/carlos3 A friend of mine writes freeware using Delphi, and has put together an very nice GUI. He said it was straightforward using Delphi's VCL.That got me thinking ... what would be involved for a D program to use VCL for its gui?
Feb 08 2005
parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Lynn Allan wrote:
 Just wondering ... can D actually use Delphi VCL components? Directly
 or indirectly? I tried to find Apollo, but the link was dead
 http://earth.prohosting.com/carlos3

That site is long dead. Try this: http://dblinux.sis.epn.edu.ec/~csantand/dmdscript.html
 
 A friend of mine writes freeware using Delphi, and has put together an
 very nice GUI. He said it was straightforward using Delphi's VCL.That
 got me thinking ... what would be involved for a D program to use VCL
 for its gui?
 
 

-- _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 08 2005
next sibling parent reply Mark T <Mark_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cuann7$2pku$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Carlos Santander B. says...
Lynn Allan wrote:
 Just wondering ... can D actually use Delphi VCL components? Directly
 or indirectly? I tried to find Apollo, but the link was dead
 http://earth.prohosting.com/carlos3

That site is long dead. Try this: http://dblinux.sis.epn.edu.ec/~csantand/dmdscript.html

Carlos, Maybe you could put Apollo in: http://www.dsource.org/projects/ so it would be easier to find.
 
 A friend of mine writes freeware using Delphi, and has put together an
 very nice GUI. He said it was straightforward using Delphi's VCL.That
 got me thinking ... what would be involved for a D program to use VCL
 for its gui?
 
 

-- _______________________ Santander Bernal

Feb 08 2005
parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Mark T wrote:
 
 Carlos, Maybe you could put Apollo in:
 http://www.dsource.org/projects/ 
 so it would be easier to find.
 
 

Like I said in the site, it's dead right now, so I won't be doing any work. So it seems like it'd be a waste. I'm not meaning to be offensive, it's just the way I feel. Now, if someone wants to take it over, just do it. I'd gladly send the Delphi unit. _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 08 2005
parent reply Charlie <Charlie_member pathlink.com> writes:
I thought this was a cool project, but Borland's license restrictions are so
harsh, even with the $100 personal edition you can't produce commercial products
:S.

Charlie


In article <cubsd1$18f2$2 digitaldaemon.com>, Carlos Santander B. says...
Mark T wrote:
 
 Carlos, Maybe you could put Apollo in:
 http://www.dsource.org/projects/ 
 so it would be easier to find.
 
 

Like I said in the site, it's dead right now, so I won't be doing any work. So it seems like it'd be a waste. I'm not meaning to be offensive, it's just the way I feel. Now, if someone wants to take it over, just do it. I'd gladly send the Delphi unit. _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal

Feb 09 2005
parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Charlie wrote:
 I thought this was a cool project, but Borland's license restrictions are so
 harsh, even with the $100 personal edition you can't produce commercial
products
 :S.
 
 Charlie
 

Well, I'd gladly take any money you guys want to provide to buy a less-restricting Delphi version and deliver an even better Apollo ;) _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 09 2005
parent reply "Charles" <no email.com> writes:
 Well, I'd gladly take any money you guys want to provide to buy a
 less-restricting Delphi version and deliver an even better Apollo ;)

Hehe I bet :). But even if you have the pro edition , and we do not, we still can't use em :(. Charlie "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> wrote in message news:cuefm2$nqm$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Charlie wrote:
 I thought this was a cool project, but Borland's license restrictions


 harsh, even with the $100 personal edition you can't produce commercial


 :S.

 Charlie

Well, I'd gladly take any money you guys want to provide to buy a less-restricting Delphi version and deliver an even better Apollo ;) _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal

Feb 12 2005
parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Charles wrote:
 
 Hehe I bet :).  But even if you have the pro edition , and we do not, we
 still can't use em :(.
 
 Charlie
 

Why not? I think if the licence allows it, then there'd be no problem. I mean, I could release the source code and the dll. You could see the source, point bugs, make suggestions, etc., but you wouldn't build your own dll. Seems like it could be used. But I think we're talking of something that won't happen (but if someone wants to prove me wrong, I won't complain :D ). _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 12 2005
parent reply Marco <Marco_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cumgqh$4e9$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Carlos Santander B. says...
Charles wrote:
 
 Hehe I bet :).  But even if you have the pro edition , and we do not, we
 still can't use em :(.
 
 Charlie
 

Why not? I think if the licence allows it, then there'd be no problem. I mean, I could release the source code and the dll. You could see the source, point bugs, make suggestions, etc., but you wouldn't build your own dll. Seems like it could be used. But I think we're talking of something that won't happen (but if someone wants to prove me wrong, I won't complain :D ).

I think Charlie is correct unless Borland has changed their licensing scheme. I just bought Delphi 4 standard from a friend who wasn't using it anymore. This is legal: "You may transfer the Software and documentation on a permanent basis provided you retain no copies and the recipient agrees to the terms of the License Agreement." Your Apollo distribution in binary form is actually not legal, Delphi 4 Standard edition says: "Regardless of any modifications which you make and regardless of how you might compile, link, and/or package your programs, under no circumstances may the libraries (including runtime libraries), code, Redistributables, and/or other files of the Software (including any portions thereof) be used for developing programs by anyone other than you." There is no limit on createtion of a commercial program in the standard edition, you must have some special student edition. The bottom line is that you can legally distribute your Apollo source code (Delphi Pascal and D code) so others that already have the Delphi program can recompile it and use it (and in my case I could actually make commercial programs, but that ain't gonna happen anytime soon).
Feb 13 2005
parent "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Marco wrote:
 
 I think Charlie is correct unless Borland has changed their licensing scheme. I
 just bought Delphi 4 standard from a friend who wasn't using it anymore. 
 This is legal:
 "You may transfer the Software and documentation on a
 permanent basis provided you retain no copies and the
 recipient agrees to the terms of the License Agreement." 
 
 Your Apollo distribution in binary form is actually not legal,
 Delphi 4 Standard edition says:
 "Regardless of any modifications
 which you make and regardless of how you might compile,
 link, and/or package your programs, under no circumstances
 may the libraries (including runtime libraries), code,
 Redistributables, and/or other files of the Software
 (including any portions thereof) be used for developing
 programs by anyone other than you." 
 
 There is no limit on createtion of a commercial program in the standard
edition,
 you must have some special student edition. 
 
 The bottom line is that you can legally distribute your Apollo source code
 (Delphi Pascal and D code) so others that already have the Delphi program can
 recompile it and use it (and in my case I could actually make commercial
 programs, but that ain't gonna happen anytime soon).  
 
 
 
 

Well, it has changed (Borland Delphi 6 Personal): GENERAL TERMS THAT APPLY TO COMPILED WORKS AND REDISTRIBUTABLES You may compile (including byte-code compile) your Works using the Software, including any libraries and source code included for such purpose with the Software. You may reproduce and distribute Works in compiled form, without additional license or fees, subject to all of the conditions in this License Agreement. You may not receive any direct or indirect compensation for the distribution or use of your Works. The entire license is a 24KB text file. If you want to read it, I can send it to you. _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 13 2005
prev sibling parent reply Marco <Marco_member pathlink.com> writes:
http://dblinux.sis.epn.edu.ec/~csantand/dmdscript.html

the DLL can't be downloaded please wrap put it in a .zip file
Feb 08 2005
parent "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
Marco wrote:
http://dblinux.sis.epn.edu.ec/~csantand/dmdscript.html

the DLL can't be downloaded please wrap put it in a .zip file

D'oh! Totally my fault: I hadn't even uploaded it. Sorry for that. It's there now. _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Feb 08 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Lynn Allan" <l_d_allan adelphia.net> writes:
Name: Lynn David Allan
Age: 53
Location: Colorado Springs, CO USA

Background:
* Wrote first fortran program in '68 on IBM 7094 ... 'perfect' integer
right triangles. (3-4-5, 5-12-13, etc).

* Last date with '68 Miss Teenage Kansas (runnerup) ... explaining how
above program worked. MEGO (my eyes glaze over :-)

* Resigned from military due to reluctance to conform to authority.

* MSIE/MSPH ... hospital efficiency expert ... paid to tell other
people how to do things better

* Fired from assistant hospital administator position ... completely
unsuited

* Drifted into computer programming in 1980 as COBOL CICS programmer

* first performance review ... "doing ok ... try to tone down your
arrogance"

* On my way to being IBM mainframe systems programmer and discovered
Sinclair z80 computer

* Couldn't believe how slow a z80 basic program was ... couldn't
believe how fast a z80 asm program was

* "gypsy contract programmer" going around the country chasing $ for
10+ years

* fired two more times, quit before being fired another 3 times

* 44 addresses in 44 years by '94

* Worked long enough in C.Springs to get mortgage approved in '94 and
retired ... good riddance

* ski bum for 5 years (xc and downhill)... bike racing as off-season
training ... go Birkie!

* became Christian 9.9.99 ... from flaming skeptic ... not what I
expected

* developed several Bible related freeware programs using Java and C++

* volunteer webmaster ordinaire for several organizations and local
right wing politician

* married to 2nd wife, 27 year old son from 1st marriage

* best job: 68k asm for medical instrumentation in '85

* 2nd best job: C++ on 128-node 'hypercube' for Star Wars simulator

* 3rd best job: 5 twelve hours days working on payroll, then 9 days
off ... back in the "good old days" when prima-donna techies were
pampered and indulged

D activities:
* Mostly a lurker with occasional newbie questions ... also have been
VERY impressed with the civility of this newsgroup

* Contributed some tutorials to dsource, some beta testing for gui
libraries

* Semi-patiently waiting for 1.0 and reasonably mature gui to port C++
freeware to D (inverse and lcdbible/berbible)

* Current main involvement is with Audacity open source audio editor
... trying to add some features applicable to speech recordings. Hope
to help eventually "wrap" libsndfile and audacity's mezzo audio
library for D.
Feb 08 2005
parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"Lynn Allan" <l_d_allan adelphia.net> wrote in message 
news:cuamcm$2ln8$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Name: Lynn David Allan
 Age: 53
 Location: Colorado Springs, CO USA

 Background:
 * Wrote first fortran program in '68 on IBM 7094 ... 'perfect' integer
 right triangles. (3-4-5, 5-12-13, etc).

What's the next one in the series? (If indeed there is one)
 * Last date with '68 Miss Teenage Kansas (runnerup) ... explaining how
 above program worked. MEGO (my eyes glaze over :-)

Why were you wasting time on computing?!
 * Resigned from military due to reluctance to conform to authority.

Ha!
 * first performance review ... "doing ok ... try to tone down your
 arrogance"

Fantastic!
 * fired two more times, quit before being fired another 3 times

Quitting a bad job's the best feeling, don't you think?
 * ski bum for 5 years (xc and downhill)... bike racing as off-season
 training ... go Birkie!

Excellent.
Feb 08 2005
parent "Pablo Aguilar" <paguilarg hotmail.com> writes:
"Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message 
news:cubfsa$t5n$2 digitaldaemon.com...
 "Lynn Allan" <l_d_allan adelphia.net> wrote in message 
 news:cuamcm$2ln8$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Name: Lynn David Allan
 Age: 53
 Location: Colorado Springs, CO USA

 Background:
 * Wrote first fortran program in '68 on IBM 7094 ... 'perfect' integer
 right triangles. (3-4-5, 5-12-13, etc).

What's the next one in the series? (If indeed there is one)

In that particular series... It's built using: (n+1)^2 = n^2 + (2n + 1) So the least of the 3 numbers has to be an odd square. So the next odd square number after 25 (5^2) is 49, hence n = 24, and the tuple is 7,24,25. You can continue up to infinity that way... There's other kinds of perfect integer tuples, but I don't know about those, I just learned about these in a math contest...
Feb 09 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent "Alex Stevenson" <ans104 cs.york.ac.uk> writes:
Might as well add myself to this...

Name: Alex Stevenson
Age: 21 (for a few more days)
Location: York, UK
Background:
Currently a student of computer science at York Uni (Formal title is  
Computer Systems and Software Engineering, MEng). I spent a year working  
for a Large Company recently, writing/testing apps for Storage Area  
Network programs in C - Lots of SCSI, interaction with Linux kernel etc.

I started coding late - I was 16 when I started in Pascal and VB, but I  
quickly moved on to C/C++/Perl (mainly self taught) and a few other odds  
and ends. I've learnt Ada, Scheme, Haskell, Prolog, B (The formal  
method),  PHP, Z80 Assembler and a few other strange languages as part of  
my course. At the moment, I'm trying to get some experience in lots of  
things before I settle down and get a career, which my dictionary  
describes as: "Career - a headlong rush, often downhill".

D Background:
I discovered D last year whilst developing in a large and fussy C codebase  
- I spent quite a bit of time wishing I could use D and proselytising the  
virtues of D to anyone who came near my cubicle. I follow the development  
of D quite closely and play with D code, but I haven't attempted anything  
significant in D yet due to time constraints and my inability to think of  
anything that would hold my attention.

C is the language I use because it gets the job done without too much  
fuss. D is the language I want to use to get the job done.

-- 
Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
Feb 08 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Carotinho <carotinobg yahoo.it> writes:
Name: Dario Andrea Raimondi
Age: 22
Location: near Bergamo, Italy
Background: My father was given a C64 as a present, when I was under 10. I
had no games, and I envied my friends with a Sega Master System or a NES,
so I couldn't but starting programming, in Basic, obviously:)
Later my parents bought me a SNES, which was funny, but couldn't replace the
C64 in my heart. In the meantime I got an old 8086 with 640kb of RAM and
Windows 2, then a series of "normal" pc and during the last months I
switched to Linux. At high school I learned Pascal, but I lost the attitude
to hack because of seeing the computer just like a gaming machine.
I'm studying philosophy in Milan, yes it has nothing to do with computer and
co., but I feel it deals better with things that really matter in life. In
the meantime, I spend my time hacking my computer, tracking some module,
playing the trumpet, writing and gaining a controversial reputation in my
home town (don't ask why...) :) I like playing sport, I think I'm not the
typical
geek because I got quite an athletic appearance:) In summer, I would spent
all my time riding a bike. I suffer the cold of winter, and my health has
been very bad these months...
I'm not such a good programmer, and my small contribution to D, shared by me
and just another person, is a wrapper to the Allegro library. I want to
code a game, and for this reason I tried to learn C and C++, hated the
later, suffered for the limitation of the other, and then discovered D.


Byez!

Carotinho
Feb 10 2005
prev sibling parent xs0 <xs0 xs0.com> writes:
Name: Mitja Slenc
Age: 25
Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
Background:
Started coding in LOGO :) at 7 or so, because my father wouldn't let me 
play games. Then I moved to ZX Basic, and I can still remember how 
drawing a single circle took like a second. Later still I got an Atari 
ST (it had a 20MB hard drive, which was truly amazing at the time) and 
moved to GFA Basic (now that was a nice Basic, it was actually fun to 
work with, fast too). Finally, I won a PC on some contest and that got 
me started on Turbo Pascal. I was really disappointed with PC's graphics 
and sound, but I still had the Atari to play with, so it was OK. Over a 
summer I read a C tutorial in some magazine and thought it was really 
neat, although I can't exactly remember why. Some time later, Windows 
arrived and that's when I started hating GUI programming, it seemed like 
you need to write hundreds of lines of code for anything you want, so I 
was happy to switch to PHP and code web sites, when the opportunity 
arrived. Of course, after you code web forms for a few years (even if 
they don't require hundreds of lines of code), you get really bored, so 
I changed jobs and am currently working mostly in Java, with occasional 
C and C++, when the JIT just doesn't do enough for the code to actually 
run fast. I'm currently working on some low-level GIS stuff, trying to 
avoid tasks that would include anything GUI-related :)

As for the non-professional life, I'm currently occupied with my baby 
girl (3 months now). Having a baby is an incredible and fulfilling 
experience, I recommend it to everybody :) When we manage to, me and my 
wife like playing board games with our friends (and we started to design 
one, almost ready), and beside an occasional movie, we don't have much 
time for anything else.

My D experience is very limited, I just discovered it a couple of months 
ago, so the only thing I managed to do so far was a few posts on this 
group. I really really like it though, and am trying to convince my 
company to develop an Eclipse-based IDE for it, make a switch from Java, 
etc. Maybe some day I'll succeed :)


xs0




Carlos Santander B. wrote:
 Since there're many new faces around here, I thought maybe we could run 
 the introductions again. (This already happened about 2 years ago: 
 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/archives/11799.html). You can add other 
 things if you want to.
 
 Name: Carlos Andrés Santander Bernal
 Age: 22
 Location: Quito, Ecuador
 Background:
 I'm a computer sciences/software engineering/computers engineering 
 student (the formal title is systems engineering, but the focus is on 
 everything, from programming to databases to networking to ... we're 
 supposed to be ready to be db administrators, network administrators, 
 project leaders, and we shouldn't aim to being programmers. Cool, ah?), 
 currently doing my thesis and working half-time in a software 
 development company.
 I started programming in GW-Basic when I was 8 or something like that. 
 Years later I moved to QBasic and the VB6 (all that just for fun). Then 
 it was university time, so I learned bits of C, C++ (not really, just 
 Turbo C++ 3), Java, Delphi, Lisp, Prolog, HTML, C#, T-SQL, JavaScript, 
 JSP, and others that I don't remember. When I was taking Compilers, I 
 wanted to write my own (still waiting) so searching for open source 
 compilers I ran into D. That was almost 3 years ago.
 What I've done in D:
 I've started a lot of things, but have finished few. Recently I was 
 playing with the DMDScript source and posted my results. I think I was 
 successful at what I wanted. I also started the Apollo library, which is 
 supposed to be a GUI library built over the Borland VCL using Delphi 6. 
 However, my (never ending) lack of time hasn't allowed me to go any 
 further, and I don't think there's much interest on it because the 
 Delphi 6 Personal Edition (the one I have) doesn't allow to use it for 
 commercial applications. Besides that, a couple of uni projects, but 
 mainly personal thingies.
 
 So, anybody else?
 
 _______________________
 Carlos Santander Bernal

Mar 06 2005