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digitalmars.D - [OT] Recommendations on Mac

reply "Matthew" <admin.hat stlsoft.dot.org> writes:
Guys

I know this is OT, but since I'm only interested in getting a Mac for C/C++/D
development, I figured this'd be the best 
place.

My simple question is: what machine (and what spec of that machine) would you
recommend me to purchase for doing 
development work on a Mac?

Cheers


-- 
Matthew Wilson

Author: "Imperfect C++", Addison-Wesley, 2004
    (http://www.imperfectcplusplus.com)
Contributing editor, C/C++ Users Journal
    (http://www.synesis.com.au/articles.html#columns)
Director, Synesis Software
    (www.synesis.com.au)
STLSoft moderator
    (http://www.stlsoft.org)

"Youth ages, Immaturity is outgrown, Ignorance can be educated, drunkeness
sobered. But stupid lasts forever", 
Aristophenes

-----------------------------------------------------
Jan 25 2005
next sibling parent reply =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Matthew wrote:

 I know this is OT, but since I'm only interested in getting a Mac for
 C/C++/D development, I figured this'd be the best place.
 
 My simple question is: what machine (and what spec of that machine)
 would you recommend me to purchase for doing development work on a
 Mac?

Either the Mac mini, or an old iMac *G4* 17", depending on if you need the monitor or not ? http://www.apple.com/macmini/specs.html http://www.lowendmac.com/imacs/17-125.html I would not recommend the new iMac G5 just yet, just because it's pricier and somewhat louder... Make sure you get at least 512 MB of RAM. And a new mouse, with the usual 2 buttons. --anders
Jan 25 2005
parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"Anders F Björklund" <afb algonet.se> wrote in message 
news:ct6ckg$2hn6$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Matthew wrote:

 I know this is OT, but since I'm only interested in getting a Mac for
 C/C++/D development, I figured this'd be the best place.

 My simple question is: what machine (and what spec of that machine)
 would you recommend me to purchase for doing development work on a
 Mac?

Either the Mac mini, or an old iMac *G4* 17", depending on if you need the monitor or not ? http://www.apple.com/macmini/specs.html http://www.lowendmac.com/imacs/17-125.html I would not recommend the new iMac G5 just yet, just because it's pricier and somewhat louder... Make sure you get at least 512 MB of RAM. And a new mouse, with the usual 2 buttons.

Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, rather than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. ;)
Jan 25 2005
next sibling parent reply =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Matthew wrote:

I know this is OT, but since I'm only interested in getting a Mac for
C/C++/D development, I figured this'd be the best place.

My simple question is: what machine (and what spec of that machine)
would you recommend me to purchase for doing development work on a
Mac?



 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, rather 
 than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. ;)

Even simpler then, get an iBook G4 12" with AirPort and an AirPort Express ? http://www.apple.com/ibook/specs.html http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/ Same goes for memory (512 MB), 60 GB HDD and just use Firewire/USB2 for more disk... --anders
Jan 25 2005
parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"Anders F Björklund" <afb algonet.se> wrote in message 
news:ct6f54$2l6d$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Matthew wrote:

I know this is OT, but since I'm only interested in getting a Mac 
for
C/C++/D development, I figured this'd be the best place.

My simple question is: what machine (and what spec of that machine)
would you recommend me to purchase for doing development work on a
Mac?



 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, rather 
 than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. ;)

Even simpler then, get an iBook G4 12" with AirPort and an AirPort Express ? http://www.apple.com/ibook/specs.html http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/ Same goes for memory (512 MB), 60 GB HDD and just use Firewire/USB2 for more disk...

Ok, thanks. I'll check it out. :-)
Jan 25 2005
parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message 
news:ct6fqa$2m59$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 "Anders F Björklund" <afb algonet.se> wrote in message 
 news:ct6f54$2l6d$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Matthew wrote:

I know this is OT, but since I'm only interested in getting a Mac 
for
C/C++/D development, I figured this'd be the best place.

My simple question is: what machine (and what spec of that machine)
would you recommend me to purchase for doing development work on a
Mac?



 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, 
 rather than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. 
 ;)

Even simpler then, get an iBook G4 12" with AirPort and an AirPort Express ? http://www.apple.com/ibook/specs.html http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/ Same goes for memory (512 MB), 60 GB HDD and just use Firewire/USB2 for more disk...

Ok, thanks. I'll check it out. :-)

Me again. I take it all Macs these days use OS-X?? :-)
Jan 25 2005
next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Matthew wrote:

Ok, thanks. I'll check it out. :-)

Me again. I take it all Macs these days use OS-X?? :-)

Yes, but Mac OS 9 is still available in emulation with the Classic Enviroment in case you need it... But no modern macs can *boot* in Mac OS 9 anymore. There's also a few Linux distributions available, such as Gentoo, Debian, Yellow Dog Linux, etc. etc. The only downside is that you lose the 3D hardware. But as a developer, Panther should be "all that". ;-) --anders
Jan 25 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message 
news:ct6fro$2m6p$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message 
 news:ct6fqa$2m59$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 "Anders F Björklund" <afb algonet.se> wrote in message 
 news:ct6f54$2l6d$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Matthew wrote:

I know this is OT, but since I'm only interested in getting a Mac 
for
C/C++/D development, I figured this'd be the best place.

My simple question is: what machine (and what spec of that 
machine)
would you recommend me to purchase for doing development work on a
Mac?



 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, 
 rather than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. 
 ;)

Even simpler then, get an iBook G4 12" with AirPort and an AirPort Express ? http://www.apple.com/ibook/specs.html http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/ Same goes for memory (512 MB), 60 GB HDD and just use Firewire/USB2 for more disk...



What's Airport and AirPort Express? All I can glean from their site is that they're something to do with playing music through my stereo - a feature I can live without. Yours Doh!fully The Dr .....
Jan 25 2005
parent reply =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Matthew wrote:

 What's Airport and AirPort Express? All I can glean from their site is 
 that they're something to do with playing music through my stereo - a 
 feature I can live without.

AirPort is Apple's trade name for IEEE 802.11b, AirPort Extreme is for IEEE 802.11g (54 Mbit/s) It's all about regular wireless networking... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AirPort_networking And for a laptop, it's a pretty handy feature ? --anders
Jan 25 2005
parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"Anders F Björklund" <afb algonet.se> wrote in message 
news:ct6inp$2pv1$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Matthew wrote:

 What's Airport and AirPort Express? All I can glean from their site 
 is that they're something to do with playing music through my 
 stereo - a feature I can live without.

AirPort is Apple's trade name for IEEE 802.11b, AirPort Extreme is for IEEE 802.11g (54 Mbit/s) It's all about regular wireless networking... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AirPort_networking And for a laptop, it's a pretty handy feature ?

Ok, since you're being so helpful, I'll run my selection by you. Here's where I'm at: - iBook 12", 768 MB, 80GB, Bluetooth (+ includes 'std' features: Airport Extreme Card, OS X, DVD-R/CD-RW) - second battery - second power pack I decided against the 14" because it's the same resolution (1024x768), and I've learned over the years that smaller (and lighter, and, thermally, cooler) is better. :-) As a total neophyte, I really don't know whether or not there's anything else I should be looking for. I'm assuming I can use GCC for C/C++, and GDC for D. I'm further assuming that I can get GVIM for editing. Do I need to care about Virus, word-processing, email, etc.etc.? Are any of those built-in in Macs? Any thoughts? Thanks again for the help so far. Matthew P.S. I am amused to note that Apple's website is still as vague / unhelpful as Apple have always been reputed to be. For example, I looked at the accessories page to see if there'd be anything else I might need, and saw "AirPort Express Base Station with AirTunes". However, I can make no sense of _what_ it is from the site. I have a suspicion that it's a wireless networking base station, but I'm realy not sure. It's most important feature is apparently that one can play tunes from one's iBook to one's Hi-Fi. Whoop-de-bloody-doop! All I want to do is to be able to plug the iBook into my local network and have it connect to the internet without any fuss. Also being able to be 'seen' by my Windows network would be nice, so I can have source-code control include it if I want to develop on it. :-)
Jan 25 2005
next sibling parent reply kris <kris_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <ct6se9$4pj$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Matthew says...
P.S. I am amused to note that Apple's website is still as vague / 
unhelpful as Apple have always been reputed to be. For example, I looked 
at the accessories page to see if there'd be anything else I might need, 
and saw "AirPort Express Base Station with AirTunes". However, I can 
make no sense of _what_ it is from the site. I have a suspicion that 
it's a wireless networking base station, but I'm realy not sure. It's 
most important feature is apparently that one can play tunes from one's 
iBook to one's Hi-Fi. Whoop-de-bloody-doop! All I want to do is to be 
able to plug the iBook into my local network and have it connect to the 
internet without any fuss. Also being able to be 'seen' by my Windows 
network would be nice, so I can have source-code control include it if I 
want to develop on it. :-)

Check this out, Matthew: http://arstechnica.com/guides/tweaks/miniguide.ars
Jan 25 2005
parent "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
"kris" <kris_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:ct79u4$mbr$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In article <ct6se9$4pj$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Matthew says...
P.S. I am amused to note that Apple's website is still as vague /
unhelpful as Apple have always been reputed to be. For example, I 
looked
at the accessories page to see if there'd be anything else I might 
need,
and saw "AirPort Express Base Station with AirTunes". However, I can
make no sense of _what_ it is from the site. I have a suspicion that
it's a wireless networking base station, but I'm realy not sure. It's
most important feature is apparently that one can play tunes from 
one's
iBook to one's Hi-Fi. Whoop-de-bloody-doop! All I want to do is to be
able to plug the iBook into my local network and have it connect to 
the
internet without any fuss. Also being able to be 'seen' by my Windows
network would be nice, so I can have source-code control include it if 
I
want to develop on it. :-)

Check this out, Matthew: http://arstechnica.com/guides/tweaks/miniguide.ars

Nice one. Thanks. :-)
Jan 25 2005
prev sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Matthew wrote:

 Ok, since you're being so helpful, I'll run my selection by you.

Seems like you upped the specs a tad? Some people get just 1 DIMM from Apple, the other module somewhere else - to put in the available slot. I've only used the iBook G3 myself, a few years back, but it looks good.
 As a total neophyte, I really don't know whether or not there's anything 
 else I should be looking for. I'm assuming I can use GCC for C/C++, and 
 GDC for D.

The Developer Tools CD comes free with the OS, including Apple's GCC
 I'm further assuming that I can get GVIM for editing. Do I 
 need to care about Virus, word-processing, email, etc.etc.? Are any of 
 those built-in in Macs?

None of them are built in, so you need to buy them or compile yourself. (as in: Virus, Microsoft Word/Outlook, etc... TextEdit and Mail exist) Most of the Open Source stuff uses X11, which works OK but looks funny. --anders PS. Yes, AirPort Express/Base Station are "just" wireless hotspots... AirPort card and 100M Ethernet are built-in, so you can ignore it. (it's compatibile with the IEEE 802.11 in cafes and real airports)
Jan 26 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message
news:ct6d78$2ilo$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, rather
 than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. ;)

I don't know if this will work with a Mac, but when space is at a premium I like to use a KVM (Keyboard Video Mouse) switch, then hook multiple computers up to it. Right now that's how I have my XP and Linux boxen set up. Only one monitor, keyboard and mouse required.
Jan 25 2005
next sibling parent =?windows-1252?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Walter wrote:

 I don't know if this will work with a Mac, but when space is at a premium I
 like to use a KVM (Keyboard Video Mouse) switch, then hook multiple
 computers up to it. Right now that's how I have my XP and Linux boxen set
 up. Only one monitor, keyboard and mouse required.

It should work OK with most of models, I think mini was meant for it... http://www.apple.com/macmini/
 Perfect for Programmers
 
 Set a space-saving Mac mini atop your workstation PC and add a KVM
 switch to share keyboard, monitor and mouse. Mac OS X includes free
 developer tools for Mac, UNIX and Java. Test out a Mac version of your
 latest creation, instantly. Pretty soon you’ll be using the Mac
 full-time, with that PC relegated to the testbed.

It's a harder problem connecting an PC external box *to* an iMac, but SSH works of course and VNC also works good - except for games. :-( --anders
Jan 25 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply kris <kris_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <ct6q1n$1sl$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter says...
"Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message
news:ct6d78$2ilo$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, rather
 than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. ;)

I don't know if this will work with a Mac, but when space is at a premium I like to use a KVM (Keyboard Video Mouse) switch, then hook multiple computers up to it. Right now that's how I have my XP and Linux boxen set up. Only one monitor, keyboard and mouse required.

Or perhaps try RealVNC over ethernet, which doesn't require the KVM deal. - Kris
Jan 25 2005
parent reply "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"kris" <kris_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:ct6qts$319$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In article <ct6q1n$1sl$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter says...
"Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message
news:ct6d78$2ilo$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, rather
 than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. ;)

I don't know if this will work with a Mac, but when space is at a premium


like to use a KVM (Keyboard Video Mouse) switch, then hook multiple
computers up to it. Right now that's how I have my XP and Linux boxen set
up. Only one monitor, keyboard and mouse required.

Or perhaps try RealVNC over ethernet, which doesn't require the KVM deal.

I think I might give that a try.
Jan 26 2005
parent Paul Bonser <misterpib gmail.com> writes:
Or perhaps try RealVNC over ethernet, which doesn't require the KVM deal.

I think I might give that a try.

I use x2vnc (there's also win2vnc and others, like x2x, etc...) to use a single keyboard and mouse with two computers, each with their own monitor. It works by creating a single-pixel wide window at one of the edges of your screen (whichever you choose, north, east, south, west), that, when your mouse enters it, starts sending VNC input to your other computer, which is running a VNC server on the main display. It doesn't take video back from the display of course, so you can run all your apps with no lag... It's a sort of simulated dual-screen, but with two different actual computers (and OSes in my case). As far as I can tell, there's no limit to how many you could link in a sort of daisy chain... *Imagines himself surrounded in a circle of 20 monitors...sigh* Okay, enough babbling from me now... -- -PIB -- "C++ also supports the notion of *friends*: cooperative classes that are permitted to see each other's private parts." - Grady Booch
Feb 03 2005
prev sibling parent reply "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> writes:
 "Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message
 news:ct6d78$2ilo$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Thanks, but Doh! I forgot to mention I was thinking of laptop, rather
 than desktop, given the vanishing room in my little office. ;)

I don't know if this will work with a Mac, but when space is at a premium I like to use a KVM (Keyboard Video Mouse) switch, then hook multiple computers up to it. Right now that's how I have my XP and Linux boxen set up. Only one monitor, keyboard and mouse required.

I also have no idea, but I also use a switcher: a 4-way ServerLink that connects my old laptop, main server, main desktop and my Linux box. Alas, that still leaves the main laptop and several other machines - including my new Mac?? - out of the picture. Should've bought an 8-way ... ;)
Jan 25 2005
parent "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"Matthew" <admin stlsoft.dot.dot.dot.dot.org> wrote in message
news:ct6r1u$39l$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 I also have no idea, but I also use a switcher: a 4-way ServerLink that
 connects my old laptop, main server, main desktop and my Linux box.
 Alas, that still leaves the main laptop and several other machines -
 including my new Mac?? - out of the picture. Should've bought an 8-way
 ... ;)

Funny thing about that. I always have one more computer than will fit on my kvm. Actually, the worst problem I have with it is the severe restriction on total cable length to the monitor. Too long, and the image starts to shimmy.
Jan 26 2005
prev sibling parent reply Forrest <forrest.ok gmail.com> writes:
Strongly recommend  the D language to support new feature of “compile time char
type identification”

D is a new language it has lot of advantages over C/C++. 
But it has some obvious disadvantages
1.	It’s main function only accepts char[][] args but wchar[][] and dchar[][]
args.  As a result if user pass Unicode args to it, it may get a wrong result.
2.	Developer have to write lots of similar functions to handle all char types
For example a developer written a class
class Foo
{
	char[][] name;
	void setNamea(char[] name){}
	void setNamew(wchar[] name){}
	void setNamed(dchar[] name){}
	
}
It is very ugly, and I hate to write this code. 

What I wish is only write the simple and natural code like this
class Foo
{
	char[][] name;
	void setName(char[] name){}
}

The char[] can stands for achar/wchar/dchar, and developer can specify the type
in the package.ini file.  With the ini file the develop can build Asicll,
Unicode or UTF-32 versions libraries/applications. 

How to approach the goal.
1.	Introduce a new key work achar stands for Asicll chars 
2.	Add a ini file to the package. The ini file is optional. If no such a file
all “char” in the source file will be treat as wchar, if there is a ini file
treat the char as specified type. So all developers in the world can possibly
use  D language without concern the char type. Unicode is the future.
3.	String in source code now has three suffix. For example “this is achar”c,
“this is wchar”w, and “this is dchar”d explicitly indicate they are of achar[],
wchar[] and dchar[]. If the user do not add such a suffix the string type may
possibly mean the string is achar[], wchar[] or dchar[] depends on the
specification of the ini file. If no ini file the string will be treated as
wchar[].
4.	Compiler of DMD provide ability to read the ini file and determines the type
char and no suffix string.
5.	The format ini file can be a plan text file or XML file. Advise to use XML,
it is more extensible.
6.	The ini file can be placed on different folder. Source code use the ini file
which is in the same folder. 
7.	
Risk and possibility.
1.	D language is new, we still has the opportunity to change it.
2.	The migration from old D to the new D will be relatively easer. User can
specify the char to stand for certain type to minimize their risk. 
3.	D should be more friendly to developer, it is worth doing the change.

What advantages we get?
1.	The D code will be more readable and natural.
2.	Use the same code to generate different versions by only change ini file.
3.	Developer can still use the achar/dchar/dchar explicitly tell the compiler
they want to use a special char type. That is to say explicit char type will
hide the specification of ini file.

Any one is interested on it?
Oct 25 2007
next sibling parent reply Yigal Chripun <yigal100 gmail.com> writes:
Forrest wrote:
 Strongly recommend  the D language to support new feature of =E2=80=9Cc=

=20
 D is a new language it has lot of advantages over C/C++.=20
 But it has some obvious disadvantages
 1.	It=E2=80=99s main function only accepts char[][] args but wchar[][] =

get a wrong result.
 2.	Developer have to write lots of similar functions to handle all char=

 For example a developer written a class
 class Foo
 {
 	char[][] name;
 	void setNamea(char[] name){}
 	void setNamew(wchar[] name){}
 	void setNamed(dchar[] name){}
 =09
 }
 It is very ugly, and I hate to write this code.=20
=20
 What I wish is only write the simple and natural code like this
 class Foo
 {
 	char[][] name;
 	void setName(char[] name){}
 }
=20
 The char[] can stands for achar/wchar/dchar, and developer can specify =

d Asicll, Unicode or UTF-32 versions libraries/applications.=20
=20
 How to approach the goal.
 1.	Introduce a new key work achar stands for Asicll chars=20
 2.	Add a ini file to the package. The ini file is optional. If no such =

ar, if there is a ini file treat the char as specified type. So all devel= opers in the world can possibly use D language without concern the char = type. Unicode is the future.
 3.	String in source code now has three suffix. For example =E2=80=9Cthi=

is dchar=E2=80=9Dd explicitly indicate they are of achar[], wchar[] and = dchar[]. If the user do not add such a suffix the string type may possibl= y mean the string is achar[], wchar[] or dchar[] depends on the specifica= tion of the ini file. If no ini file the string will be treated as wchar[= ].
 4.	Compiler of DMD provide ability to read the ini file and determines =

 5.	The format ini file can be a plan text file or XML file. Advise to u=

 6.	The ini file can be placed on different folder. Source code use the =

 7.=09
 Risk and possibility.
 1.	D language is new, we still has the opportunity to change it.
 2.	The migration from old D to the new D will be relatively easer. User=

 3.	D should be more friendly to developer, it is worth doing the change=

=20
 What advantages we get?
 1.	The D code will be more readable and natural.
 2.	Use the same code to generate different versions by only change ini =

 3.	Developer can still use the achar/dchar/dchar explicitly tell the co=

type will hide the specification of ini file.
=20
 Any one is interested on it?

You got it wrong. D uses only UTF (don't forget that ASCII is a subset=20 of UTF-8). the different char types are different UTF encodings: char =3D utf-8 wchar =3D utf-16 dchar =3D utf-32 If you use a modern OS that supports Unicode than you can pass arguments = in what ever language you want - even Klingon! If you need a more abstract type, there's a String class on -=20 http://www.descent.org, or you could look in Tango for a similar module. IMH, most of the time you don't need anything fancier than those=20 primitive types.
Oct 25 2007
parent Forrest <forrest.ok gmail.com> writes:
Vladimir Panteleev Wrote:

 On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 14:36:09 +0300, Yigal Chripun <yigal100 gmail.com> wrote:
 
 Forrest wrote:
 Strongly recommend  the D language to support new feature of “compile time
char type identification”

You got it wrong. D uses only UTF (don't forget that ASCII is a subset of UTF-8). the different char types are different UTF encodings: char = utf-8 wchar = utf-16 dchar = utf-32 If you use a modern OS that supports Unicode than you can pass arguments in what ever language you want - even Klingon! If you need a more abstract type, there's a String class on - http://www.descent.org, or you could look in Tango for a similar module. IMH, most of the time you don't need anything fancier than those primitive types.

Also take a look at this nice long explanation: http://www.prowiki.org/wiki4d/wiki.cgi?DanielKeep/TextInD (btw, this page should be easier to find :) ) -- Best regards, Vladimir mailto:thecybershadow gmail.com

Thanks for all of you, now i got it. -Forrest
Oct 25 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent Paul Findlay <r.lph50+d gmail.com> writes:
 Strongly recommend the D language to support new feature of "compile
 time char type identification"

The tango project (http://dsource.org/projects/tango/) has a lot of code that works with all three UTF encodings because it is templated. My only wish is that phobos or tango came with a function that "scrubbed" supposedly utf-8 strings of invalid values. - Paul
Oct 25 2007
prev sibling next sibling parent "Vladimir Panteleev" <thecybershadow gmail.com> writes:
On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 14:36:09 +0300, Yigal Chripun <yigal100 gmail.com> wrote:

 Forrest wrote:
 Strongly recommend  the D language to support new feature of “compile time
char type identification”

You got it wrong. D uses only UTF (don't forget that ASCII is a subset of UTF-8). the different char types are different UTF encodings: char = utf-8 wchar = utf-16 dchar = utf-32 If you use a modern OS that supports Unicode than you can pass arguments in what ever language you want - even Klingon! If you need a more abstract type, there's a String class on - http://www.descent.org, or you could look in Tango for a similar module. IMH, most of the time you don't need anything fancier than those primitive types.

Also take a look at this nice long explanation: http://www.prowiki.org/wiki4d/wiki.cgi?DanielKeep/TextInD (btw, this page should be easier to find :) ) -- Best regards, Vladimir mailto:thecybershadow gmail.com
Oct 25 2007
prev sibling parent "Janice Caron" <caron800 googlemail.com> writes:
On 10/25/07, Forrest <forrest.ok gmail.com> wrote:
 With the ini file the develop can build Asicll, Unicode or UTF-32 versions

I think you're confused ... but right now, so am I, because I have never heard of an encoding called "Asicll". What is "Asicll" ? If you mean ASCII, then you just use char[], since valid ASCII is valid UTF-8. UTF-32 is just uncompressed Unicode. D accepts all three UTFs (Unicode Translation Formats) natively, so I don't see a problem.
Oct 25 2007