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digitalmars.D - The best environment for D

reply nail <nail_member pathlink.com> writes:
Hi all.

You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
applications do you use for D programming:
1) Platform
2) Editor
3) Build system
4) Debugger
5) Profiler
6) Others

As for me, my replies are:
1) Win32
2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor with
native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
builder
3) SCons (www.scons.org)
4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any debugger to work
with D
5) None. See (4) :)
Jan 22 2005
next sibling parent "Matthew" <admin.hat stlsoft.dot.org> writes:
"nail" <nail_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Hi all.

 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

 As for me, my replies are:

1) Win32, soon to be Linux 2) Visual Studio '98 and/or gvim 3) make 4) none 5) none
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
nail wrote:

 So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:

 1) Platform

Fedora Core. (Linux)
 2) Editor

Nano.
 3) Build system

 4) Debugger

 5) Profiler

http://developer.apple.com/tools/shark_optimize.html
 6) Others

Compilers: GCC 3.3 GDC 0.10 Packaging: RPM 4.3 Others: Perl 5.8 Lots of GNU tools. (diff, patch, bash, wget, etc) --anders
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply zwang <nehzgnaw gmail.com> writes:
nail wrote:
 Hi all.
 
 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others
 
 As for me, my replies are:
 1) Win32
 2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor with
 native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
 builder
 3) SCons (www.scons.org)
 4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any debugger to
work
 with D
 5) None. See (4) :)
 
 

1) Win32 2) Visual Studio 98 3) make 4) Visual Studio 98 5) none
Jan 22 2005
parent reply zwang <nehzgnaw gmail.com> writes:
zwang wrote:
 nail wrote:
 
 Hi all.

 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to 
 choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something 
 new and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

 As for me, my replies are:
 1) Win32
 2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor 
 with
 native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
 builder
 3) SCons (www.scons.org)
 4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any 
 debugger to work
 with D
 5) None. See (4) :)

1) Win32 2) Visual Studio 98 3) make 4) Visual Studio 98 5) none

BTW, PN2(2.5.34) does not seem to support D natively. I had to write a customized scheme for D.
Jan 22 2005
parent nail <nail_member pathlink.com> writes:
BTW, PN2(2.5.34) does not seem to support D natively.  I had to write a 
customized scheme for D.

Hm.. I've download the same version but it does :)
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
nail wrote:
 Hi all.
 
 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others
 
 As for me, my replies are:
 1) Win32
 2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor with
 native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
 builder
 3) SCons (www.scons.org)
 4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any debugger to
work
 with D
 5) None. See (4) :)
 
 

1) WinXP and Gentoo Linux 2) Scite (windows), Eclipse (windows), Scite (Linux), Kate (Linux), experimenting with gvim (Linux) 3) dmd/gcc 3.4.3 (linking), experimenting with "dmake" and "build" on Linux 4) sometimes gdb (Linux), periodically Valgrind (Linux) 5) none 6) Eclipse D plugin was quite "fun" and practical to use but too buggy for my purposes, so I gave up on it (both Windows and Linux); I have tried Scons for building - I am mildly impressed, but I'd rather have a tool that doesn't rely on a full Python installation, is d specific, and is standalone (ie, dmake or build). Later, John R.
Jan 22 2005
parent reply nail <nail_member pathlink.com> writes:
Eclipse D plugin was quite "fun" and practical to use but too buggy 
for my purposes, so I gave up on it (both Windows and Linux); I have 
tried Scons for building - I am mildly impressed, but I'd rather have a 
tool that doesn't rely on a full Python installation, is d specific, and 
is standalone (ie, dmake or build).

I tried to use eclipse. It's great platform as it, but eclipseD - not. About a week I discovered structure of CDT plugin (for C/C++ development) with aim to remake it for D. But because I don't know Java language higher then read-only, the attempt was of course failed :). If somebody might to refactor CDT in DDT it would be so great - editor, outline, build, debug (gdb based) in one place for win32 and linux simultaneously plus count of external useful plugins. But alas it just a dream for nearest year or two, ehhh... pity.
Jan 22 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 16:14:26 +0000, nail wrote:

 
Eclipse D plugin was quite "fun" and practical to use but too buggy 
for my purposes, so I gave up on it (both Windows and Linux); I have 
tried Scons for building - I am mildly impressed, but I'd rather have a 
tool that doesn't rely on a full Python installation, is d specific, and 
is standalone (ie, dmake or build).

I tried to use eclipse. It's great platform as it, but eclipseD - not. About a week I discovered structure of CDT plugin (for C/C++ development) with aim to remake it for D. But because I don't know Java language higher then read-only, the attempt was of course failed :). If somebody might to refactor CDT in DDT it would be so great - editor, outline, build, debug (gdb based) in one place for win32 and linux simultaneously plus count of external useful plugins. But alas it just a dream for nearest year or two, ehhh... pity.

Yep. I hear you. I tried to have a look at the Java code once many moons ago, but could not make much sense out of it. I ended up getting plenty annoyed with the Java style and gave up trying to figure it all out. It would be wonderful if a Java expert took the challenge. I'm sure someone with enough background could make a CDT -> DDT conversion work. Even better would be if a dmake tool were integrated into the D eclipse system. The automated build process would make D development alarmingly fun. :-) - John R.
Jan 22 2005
parent reply Paul Bonser <misterpib gmail.com> writes:
 It would be wonderful if a Java expert took the challenge.  I'm sure
 someone with enough background could make a CDT -> DDT conversion work. 
 Even better would be if a dmake tool were integrated into the D eclipse
 system.  The automated build process would make D development alarmingly
 fun. :-) 
 
 - John R.

I'm not completely sure if I would be considered an expert yet...but I'm pretty competent with Java, and I've been studying the eclipse platform. I think I'd like to help out with this as know it would help D a lot to have something equivalent to the Java tools that are in Eclipse for D. (who wouldn't like to have errors show up as you type them rather than having to wait until you compile to get them all?) I actually have my sights set a bit higher than all that has been suggested so far, and I plan to unveil some of that within the next week or so, once I've got something to show for it. Let's just say I'm excited about what I've started on :) -- -PIB -- "C++ also supports the notion of *friends*: cooperative classes that are permitted to see each other's private parts." - Grady Booch
Jan 22 2005
parent reply John Reimer <brk_6502 yahoo.com> writes:
On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 16:11:39 -0800, Paul Bonser wrote:

 It would be wonderful if a Java expert took the challenge.  I'm sure
 someone with enough background could make a CDT -> DDT conversion work. 
 Even better would be if a dmake tool were integrated into the D eclipse
 system.  The automated build process would make D development alarmingly
 fun. :-) 
 
 - John R.

I'm not completely sure if I would be considered an expert yet...but I'm pretty competent with Java, and I've been studying the eclipse platform. I think I'd like to help out with this as know it would help D a lot to have something equivalent to the Java tools that are in Eclipse for D. (who wouldn't like to have errors show up as you type them rather than having to wait until you compile to get them all?) I actually have my sights set a bit higher than all that has been suggested so far, and I plan to unveil some of that within the next week or so, once I've got something to show for it. Let's just say I'm excited about what I've started on :) -- -PIB

Well, I use the term "Java expert" loosely here to mean anybody with more knowledge than I on the subject (which should qualify plenty enough people :-) ). If you are "pretty competent" than you're probably a java guru :from my perspective. It sounds like you've been busy! If so, I'm excited to see what you've got up your sleeve. No doubt, your submissions will be well received by the D community! Good luck, John R.
Jan 22 2005
parent Paul Bonser <misterpib gmail.com> writes:
 Well, I use the term "Java expert" loosely here to mean anybody with more
 knowledge than I on the subject (which should qualify plenty enough people
 :-) ).  If you are "pretty competent" than you're probably a java guru
 :from my perspective.
 
 It sounds like you've been busy!  If so, I'm excited to see what you've
 got up your sleeve.  No doubt, your submissions will be well received by
 the D community!
 
 Good luck,
 
 John R.

Yeah, I'm hoping my contribution will be a good one. It'll be the first major contribution that I'll have made to..well, anything. -- -PIB -- "C++ also supports the notion of *friends*: cooperative classes that are permitted to see each other's private parts." - Grady Booch
Jan 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Chris Sauls <Chris_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com>, nail says...
1) Platform
2) Editor
3) Build system
4) Debugger
5) Profiler
6) Others

1) Win32/NT, Linux 2) EditPlus (Win32), nano (Linux) 3) SCons, at least until something D-particular comes along 4) none 5) none -- Chris Sauls
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent clayasaurus <clayasaurus_member pathlink.com> writes:
1) yoper and mepis linux
2) kate
3) dmake
4) want to use gdb, but havn't yet. used writef though
5) none
6) none

In article <cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com>, nail says...
Hi all.

You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
applications do you use for D programming:
1) Platform
2) Editor
3) Build system
4) Debugger
5) Profiler
6) Others

As for me, my replies are:
1) Win32
2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor with
native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
builder
3) SCons (www.scons.org)
4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any debugger to work
with D
5) None. See (4) :)

Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent "Huang Yicheng" <zergbird msn.com> writes:
"nail" <nail_member pathlink.com> wrote in message 
news:cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Hi all.

 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to 
 choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new 
 and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

 As for me, my replies are:
 1) Win32
 2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor 
 with
 native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
 builder
 3) SCons (www.scons.org)
 4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any debugger 
 to work
 with D
 5) None. See (4) :)

1) win32 2) vs98 3) vs98 (my project is not very large:- )) 4) vs98 5) none
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent "Asaf Karagila" <kas1 netvision.net.il> writes:
 1) Platform

 2) Editor

while
 3) Build system

about that
 4) Debugger

 5) Profiler

 6) Others

- Asaf.
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent David L. Davis <SpottedTiger yahoo.com> writes:
 nail says...
1) Platform
2) Editor
3) Build system
4) Debugger
5) Profiler
6) Others

1) MS WinXP SP2 2) Crimson Editor (UTF-8/UTF-16, has D highlighting) 3) XP commandline / create a batch file (.bat/.cmd) 4) Have MS Visual Studio .NET 2002, but I use writefln()s 5) none 6) a. MS SQL Server 2000 Programmer's version 6) b. MS Access 2002 6) c. XRay a really good free XML Editor. 6) d. Dependency Walker v2.1, a free utility that scans any 32-bit or 64-bit Windows module. * The link below shows a list of my past, present, and future tools. :) http://spottedtiger.tripod.com/D_Language/D_List_of_Tools_XP.html ------------------------------------------------------------------- "Dare to reach for the Stars...Dare to Dream, Build, and Achieve!"
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Lukas Pinkowski <Lukas.Pinkowski web.de> writes:
 1) Platform

 2) Editor

 3) Build system

 4) Debugger

 5) Profiler

 6) Others

Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Rod Haper <rhaper houston.rr.com> writes:
nail wrote:
 Hi all.
 
 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

1) Platform -> Fedora Core 3 & 2 Linux 2) Editor -> vim (text mode - not gvim) 3) Build system -> GNU make 4) Debugger -> gdb and/or "printf/writef" statements 5) Profiler -> not aware of any 6) Others -> none at the moment
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent "Charles" <no email.com> writes:
"nail" <nail_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Hi all.

 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to

 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new

 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

 As for me, my replies are:
 1) Win32
 2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor

 native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
 builder
 3) SCons (www.scons.org)
 4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any debugger

 with D
 5) None. See (4) :)

1) Linux , Win32 2) Emacs 3) Perl scripts 4) printf! 5) none 6) grep , strace, libcurl (?) Cappa!
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Anders Runesson <anders runesson.info> writes:
nail wrote:

 1) Platform

 2) Editor

working with KDevelop.. Have tried leds, but it's too buggy to be usable for now.
 3) Build system

 4) Debugger

 5) Profiler

 6) Others

/Anders Rson
Jan 22 2005
parent reply "Charles" <no email.com> writes:
 Emacs for now, until I find something better.

Have you tried http://cedet.sourceforge.net/ ? Some really cool tools there. Charlie "Anders Runesson" <anders runesson.info> wrote in message news:csubcb$18ec$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 nail wrote:

 1) Platform

 2) Editor

working with KDevelop.. Have tried leds, but it's too buggy to be usable for now.
 3) Build system

 4) Debugger

 5) Profiler

 6) Others

/Anders Rson

Jan 22 2005
parent reply Anders Runesson <anders runesson.info> writes:
Charles wrote:
Emacs for now, until I find something better.

Something better ?!?!?! :P

Yes - and so far, I haven't found anything. I would like to find a good editor/ide that I can configure just the way I like it without having to learn lisp first. Emacs does work almost the way I like it to, but not quite and I'm too lazy to read enough to be able to fix things myself.
 
 Have you tried http://cedet.sourceforge.net/  ?  Some really cool tools
 there.
 
 Charlie

Yeah, I've seen it but I just haven't gotten around to setting stuff up. A lot of docs to read... ;) /Anders Rson
Jan 22 2005
parent reply Ben Hinkle <Ben_member pathlink.com> writes:
In article <csuind$1hi4$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Anders Runesson says...
Charles wrote:
Emacs for now, until I find something better.

Something better ?!?!?! :P

Yes - and so far, I haven't found anything. I would like to find a good editor/ide that I can configure just the way I like it without having to learn lisp first. Emacs does work almost the way I like it to, but not quite and I'm too lazy to read enough to be able to fix things myself.

One of my co-workers wrote JDE (Java Development Environment or something) for emacs and that's pretty popular. It shouldn't be too hard to modify it for D (famous last words...) I don't know much elisp either but I'll ping him to get his 2 cents.
Jan 22 2005
parent reply Anders Runesson <anders runesson.info> writes:
Ben Hinkle wrote:
 In article <csuind$1hi4$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Anders Runesson says...
 
Charles wrote:

Emacs for now, until I find something better.

Something better ?!?!?! :P

Yes - and so far, I haven't found anything. I would like to find a good editor/ide that I can configure just the way I like it without having to learn lisp first. Emacs does work almost the way I like it to, but not quite and I'm too lazy to read enough to be able to fix things myself.

One of my co-workers wrote JDE (Java Development Environment or something) for emacs and that's pretty popular. It shouldn't be too hard to modify it for D (famous last words...) I don't know much elisp either but I'll ping him to get his 2 cents.

I took a peek at jde, and I must say it looks pretty cool. Maybe it's time to bite the bullet and get aquainted with elisp after all.. Having "D Development Environment" for emacs would be just wonderful. I'd just better remember to bring a map and compass into the Jungle of Endless Parentheses... ;) /Anders Rson
Jan 22 2005
parent reply John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
Anders Runesson wrote:
  > I took a peek at jde, and I must say it looks pretty cool. Maybe it's
 time to bite the bullet and get aquainted with elisp after all.. Having 
 "D Development Environment" for emacs would be just wonderful.

I just started using emacs for my D programming. If you modify JDE to DDE, and release it, I will praise you forever.
 
 I'd just better remember to bring a map and compass into the Jungle of 
 Endless Parentheses... ;)
 
 /Anders Rson
 
 

Jan 22 2005
parent "Charles" <no email.com> writes:
And I'd slauter a lamb in your name!

Charlie

"John Demme" <me teqdruid.com> wrote in message
news:csv3tf$23nv$2 digitaldaemon.com...
 Anders Runesson wrote:
   > I took a peek at jde, and I must say it looks pretty cool. Maybe it's
 time to bite the bullet and get aquainted with elisp after all.. Having
 "D Development Environment" for emacs would be just wonderful.

I just started using emacs for my D programming. If you modify JDE to DDE, and release it, I will praise you forever.
 I'd just better remember to bring a map and compass into the Jungle of
 Endless Parentheses... ;)

 /Anders Rson


Jan 26 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Sebastian Beschke <s.beschke gmx.de> writes:
Platform: WinXP Home and Ubuntu Linux 4.10
Editor: jEdit
Build System: SCons, though I'll have a look at A-A-P
Debugger: None :(
Profiler: None

This setup has the advantage that it works identically on Windows and 
Linux. jEdit's D support is quite decent (including auto indenting).
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent h3r3tic <foo bar.baz> writes:
 1) Platform

WinXP SP2 En
 2) Editor

DIDE (with badass black background)
 3) Build system

DIDE
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler

none
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Lars Ivar Igesund <larsivar igesund.net> writes:
nail wrote:
 Hi all.
 
 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

1) Win32 and Gentoo Linux 2) gVim (yes, also in Windows) 3) A-A-P (although it is buggy on Linux, will hopefully be fixed soon by me). If a D based alternative that I like pops up, I might change. 4) Only tried WinDbg yet 5) None yet 6) svn (cvs) Lars Ivar Igesund
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent "Carlos Santander B." <csantander619 gmail.com> writes:
nail wrote:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others
 

1) WinXP and FC2, but mainly Windows 2) SciTe on Windows, gedit and vim on linux 3) basically, none. make, just sometimes 4) none 5) "dmd -gt" on Windows only (because it doesn't work on linux) _______________________ Carlos Santander Bernal
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"nail" <nail_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Hi all.

 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to

 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new

 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

5) Use the built-in profiler! Just throw the -gt switch, and recompile. Run the app as usual, and at the end, look at the output in trace.log.
Jan 22 2005
next sibling parent reply zwang <nehzgnaw gmail.com> writes:
-------- Original Message --------

 
 5) Use the built-in profiler! Just throw the -gt switch, and recompile. Run
 the app as usual, and at the end, look at the output in trace.log.
 
 

I don't quite understand what "Tree Time" in the log means.
Jan 22 2005
parent "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"zwang" <nehzgnaw gmail.com> wrote in message
news:csv5i6$260o$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 -------- Original Message --------

 5) Use the built-in profiler! Just throw the -gt switch, and recompile.


 the app as usual, and at the end, look at the output in trace.log.

I don't quite understand what "Tree Time" in the log means.

Time spent in the function plus all the functions it calls. Function time is the time spent just in that function, not in what it calls.
Jan 23 2005
prev sibling parent reply Rod Haper <rhaper houston.rr.com> writes:
Walter wrote:
 "nail" <nail_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
 news:cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 
Hi all.

You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to

choose
convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new

and
compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
applications do you use for D programming:
1) Platform
2) Editor
3) Build system
4) Debugger
5) Profiler
6) Others

5) Use the built-in profiler! Just throw the -gt switch, and recompile. Run the app as usual, and at the end, look at the output in trace.log.

Ummmm .... -gt doesn't seem to be supported for Linux yet.
Jan 22 2005
next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
Rod Haper wrote:

 5) Use the built-in profiler! Just throw the -gt switch, and 
 recompile. Run
 the app as usual, and at the end, look at the output in trace.log.

Ummmm .... -gt doesn't seem to be supported for Linux yet.

http://www.digitalmars.com/d/dcompiler.html says:
 -gt
     add trace profiling hooks (not supported under linux)

You can use GDC, and GNU profiler "gprof", instead: (showing an example for the simple "sieve" program)
 gdc -g -pg -o sieve sieve.d 
 
 ./sieve
 
 gprof ./sieve

gprof has the same "problem" with the D name mangling as gdb has too, that is: __D6dmain29true_mainFiPPaZi --anders PS. "gdb" is the GNU debugger, for those who didn't know. (gdb ./sieve, and then just issue the "help" command)
Jan 23 2005
prev sibling parent "Walter" <newshound digitalmars.com> writes:
"Rod Haper" <rhaper houston.rr.com> wrote in message
news:csvfu3$2hlp$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 5) Use the built-in profiler! Just throw the -gt switch, and recompile.


 the app as usual, and at the end, look at the output in trace.log.


That's true. It shouldn't be hard to, I just haven't done the work yet.
Jan 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent David Medlock <amedlock nospam.org> writes:
nail wrote:
 Hi all.
 
 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to choose
 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new and
 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others
 

1) Win 2k 2) Crimson Editor 3) SMAKE ( from DMC++ CD ) 4) writefln, my brain 5) none I really wish AnyEdit had D support, it looks really nice! (http://www.anyedit.org/)
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Nick Sabalausky" <z a.a> writes:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

1) WinXP 2) Visual Studio 6 and Visual Studio .NET 2003 3) NMAKE, until I try that neat-o SCons you mentioned (It looks even nicer than Ant!) 4) None yet 5) None yet 6) DCoder (http://dsource.org/projects/dcoder/) and a custom D Project AppWizard (Once I get around to making it!)
Jan 22 2005
parent "Nick Sabalausky" <z a.a> writes:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

1) WinXP 2) Visual Studio 6 and Visual Studio .NET 2003 3) NMAKE, until I try that neat-o SCons you mentioned (It looks even nicer than Ant!) 4) None yet 5) None yet 6) DCoder (http://dsource.org/projects/dcoder/) and a custom D Project AppWizard (Once I get around to making it!)

Oh yea, and subversion w/ TortoiseSVN. Can't forget that! (Now that I've started using version control, I'll never go without it again!)
Jan 22 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Carotinho <carotinobg yahoo.it> writes:
hi!

 1) Platform

 2) Editor

 3) Build system

 4) Debugger

 5) Profiler

 6) Others

in debugging Byez! Carotinho
Jan 23 2005
parent reply John Demme <me teqdruid.com> writes:
Carotinho wrote:
 hi!
 
 
1) Platform

Linux, Slackware 10
2) Editor

Kate. I love it:)

I was using Kate up until about a week ago. I switched over to emacs... Takes bit to learn, but with the D syntax highlighting script (I think this is one of Ben's things, but please forgive me if I'm wrong) I much prefer it over kate.
3) Build system

none, just simple programs:)

Try scons... I love it and it's got built in D support.
 
4) Debugger

printf and sometimes gdb

Why hasn't anyone written a D name demangler for gdb yet? (Or am I wrong?) It doesn't seem like a particularly difficult task to me. John
Jan 23 2005
next sibling parent =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Anders_F_Bj=F6rklund?= <afb algonet.se> writes:
John Demme wrote:

 Why hasn't anyone written a D name demangler for gdb yet? (Or am I 
 wrong?)  It doesn't seem like a particularly difficult task to me.

James Dunne wrote a demangler, which seems to be working OK... digitalmars.D/14203 The only downside is that 1) it does printf 2) not GDB integrated http://svn.dsource.org/svn/projects/bindings/trunk/demangle.d If anyone could plug this in to gdb/gprof, that would be excellent! --anders
Jan 23 2005
prev sibling parent Carotinho <carotinobg yahoo.it> writes:
Hi!

2) Editor

Kate. I love it:)

I was using Kate up until about a week ago. I switched over to emacs... Takes bit to learn, but with the D syntax highlighting script (I think this is one of Ben's things, but please forgive me if I'm wrong) I much prefer it over kate.

But my Kate come from the installation CD with already D syntax highlighting which i would never have expected. When I discovered it, I could enjoy having the code I'm working on, the console and the list of files in a single screen:) By the way It's Kate 2.2.1 with KDE 3.2.3.
 Try scons... I love it and it's got built in D support.

I've downloaded this for it was required by a certain program, but never looked at it. Mainly because my usual compile line is "dmd file.d file2.d `something`":) But if it's really simpler than Makefiles, which I cannot look at without feeling sick, I will like it:;) Byez! Carotinho
Jan 24 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent "Jarrett Billingsley" <kb3ctd2 yahoo.com> writes:
1) Platform
WinXP

2) Editor
ConText

3) Build system
a bat file in each "project" directory, which simply defines some
parameters, and calls a main compile bat file in the base projects
directory.  no make or anything as i don't have any projects big enough to
worry about that.

4) Debugger
i'm perfect, what can i say, my code never has bugs.  ;)  i can get by
without one.

5) Profiler
i'm not THAT much of a nerd!

6) Others
i'd really, really, REALLY like to see a standard, useful D IDE soon.  very
soon.  it really sucks that DIDE just .. stopped, and we haven't heard
anything about its supposed successor, Elephant.  there's LEDS, but that's
in beta and it's linux-only (unless you want the nonfunctional windows
version).  i'd rather not go through the trouble of using visual studio
either.
Jan 23 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Brian Chapman <nospam-for-brian see-post-for-address.net> writes:
1) Platform:  Mac OS X 10.2.8, I also have Linux and WinXP but I rarely 
boot those up anymore. Maybe someday I'll get a switch box for them.

2) Editor:  nedit mostly, but sometimes 'mi' or Project Builder

3) Build system:  GNU make mostly, else Project Builder

4) Debugger:  gdb for stack trace, brain for figuring out why.

5) Profiler:  I mostly just eyeball it. ;-)

6) Others: oh, you know, the usual arsenal of UNIX and GNU tools. I 
wouldn't know what to do if I didn't have an xterm or three open. I 
also use Source Navigator a LOT for browsing sources, but that's not D 
related.

:-)
Jan 25 2005
prev sibling next sibling parent Georg Wrede <georg.wrede nospam.org> writes:
nail wrote:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

1: Linux, often also win98, w2000. 2: Mostly vim (both Win & Lin). For trivial tasks also Notepad. 3: Mostly command line, more seriously custom scripts. 4: None. They're fancy, but I'm used to variable printing and asserts. 5: I'm too old to be busy. 6: Standard *nix (and Cygwin) text tools, like grep and the like.
Jan 26 2005
prev sibling parent "Zz" <Zz Zz.com> writes:
1) Windows
2) Visual SlickEdit
3) make
4) none for now.
5) none

With visual slickedit you can select a debugger to use or use the embedded
gdb debugger with a Visual Studio interface. Is there any way dmd can
generate debug info that can be used by gdb.
It can be used as GNU C/C++ editor and debugger.

Zz

"nail" <nail_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:cstfa2$t0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Hi all.

 You can treat this topic as a poll. I think this can help begginers to

 convenient tools to use D and advanced programmers to try something new

 compare with already used tools. So, the question is: what tools and
 applications do you use for D programming:
 1) Platform
 2) Editor
 3) Build system
 4) Debugger
 5) Profiler
 6) Others

 As for me, my replies are:
 1) Win32
 2) Programmers notepad 2 (www.pnotepad.org) - simple opensource editor

 native D syntax highlight support and ability to call external tools like
 builder
 3) SCons (www.scons.org)
 4) None. I use printf where I need, 'cause I couldn't force any debugger

 with D
 5) None. See (4) :)

Jan 26 2005