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D.gnu - gcc tree structure

reply "Steven Shaw" <steven_shaw iprimus.com.au> writes:
I found a link to some stuff about the GCC tree structure:

    http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/~wendling/tree.html

As I understand it, the opend effort is building the glue to take the result
of Walter's D front-end and
output a GCC tree structure. Right? Or is it supposed to produce a GCC rtl
structure directly?

BTW, I've spent the last couple of weekends trying to get debian installed
on my laptop (unfortuanately
my one and only computer at the moment). Looks like I'll end up at a local
user group to get it right
in Saturday week. In the meantime what is the best way to come up to speed?
What's a good read?

Cheers, Steve.
Aug 02 2002
parent reply Jan Knepper <jan smartsoft.cc> writes:
Steven Shaw wrote:

 I found a link to some stuff about the GCC tree structure:

     http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/~wendling/tree.html

 As I understand it, the opend effort is building the glue to take the result
 of Walter's D front-end and
 output a GCC tree structure. Right? Or is it supposed to produce a GCC rtl
 structure directly?

The approach is to build a GCC tree structure and submit it to the GCC back-end for code generation.
 BTW, I've spent the last couple of weekends trying to get debian installed
 on my laptop (unfortuanately
 my one and only computer at the moment). Looks like I'll end up at a local
 user group to get it right
 in Saturday week. In the meantime what is the best way to come up to speed?
 What's a good read?

Try something else: My personal preference is BSD, not Linux http://www.freebsd.org/ http://www.openbsd.org/ http://www.netbsd.org/ RedHat and SuSe Linux seem to be pretty good too. Jan
Aug 02 2002
parent reply "Steven Shaw" <steven_shaw iprimus.com.au> writes:
"Jan Knepper" <jan smartsoft.cc> wrote in message
news:3D4B66C8.1DA5D751 smartsoft.cc...
 Steven Shaw wrote:

 I found a link to some stuff about the GCC tree structure:

     http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/~wendling/tree.html

 As I understand it, the opend effort is building the glue to take the


 of Walter's D front-end and
 output a GCC tree structure. Right? Or is it supposed to produce a GCC


 structure directly?

The approach is to build a GCC tree structure and submit it to the GCC

 for code generation.

Great. What's the best way to come up to speed (without actually having a working development environment)?
 BTW, I've spent the last couple of weekends trying to get debian


 on my laptop (unfortuanately
 my one and only computer at the moment). Looks like I'll end up at a


 user group to get it right
 in Saturday week. In the meantime what is the best way to come up to


 What's a good read?

Try something else: My personal preference is BSD, not Linux http://www.freebsd.org/ http://www.openbsd.org/ http://www.netbsd.org/

How come? Any chance it would be easier to install on a laptop?
 RedHat and SuSe Linux seem to be pretty good too.

I've already gave Mandrake a good try a while back. I then tried Progeny which is supposed to be a no-brainer install derived from Debian. It's was no good. I just figured that it would be best to just keep trying with Debian until I knew enough to get it right. At the moment it's Windows XP/NTFS that are being the most difficult. The first time I turned up to the user-group to install Debian it took >8 hours to defrag the hdd! There wasn't much time left after that. Cheers, Steve.
Aug 03 2002
next sibling parent reply user domain.invalid writes:
Steven Shaw wrote:
Try something else:
My personal preference is BSD, not Linux
http://www.freebsd.org/
http://www.openbsd.org/
http://www.netbsd.org/

How come? Any chance it would be easier to install on a laptop?

Maybe, FreeBSD 4.5 installed on my notebook (Dell INSPIRON 4100) via an internet connection with 2 downloaded floppy images was a piece of cake. See http://www.freebsd.org
 
 
RedHat and SuSe Linux seem to be pretty good too.

I've already gave Mandrake a good try a while back. I then tried Progeny which is supposed to be a no-brainer install derived from Debian. It's was no good. I just figured that it would be best to just keep trying with Debian until I knew enough to get it right. At the moment it's Windows XP/NTFS that are being the most difficult. The first time I turned up to the user-group to install Debian it took >8 hours to defrag the hdd! There wasn't much time left after that. Cheers, Steve.

Aug 03 2002
parent Jan Knepper <jan smartsoft.cc> writes:
user domain.invalid wrote:

 How come?
 Any chance it would be easier to install on a laptop?

Maybe, FreeBSD 4.5 installed on my notebook (Dell INSPIRON 4100) via an internet connection with 2 downloaded floppy images was a piece of cake.

Yup! That's the FreeBSD spirit! If you rather use CD-ROM's email me you address... I'll see what I can do. Jan
Aug 03 2002
prev sibling parent Jan Knepper <jan smartsoft.cc> writes:
 As I understand it, the opend effort is building the glue to take the


 of Walter's D front-end and
 output a GCC tree structure. Right? Or is it supposed to produce a GCC


 structure directly?

The approach is to build a GCC tree structure and submit it to the GCC

 for code generation.

working development environment)?

Do not know, I have not worked without a working development environment for over 15 years. You would have to be able to look at sources and docco.
 BTW, I've spent the last couple of weekends trying to get debian


 on my laptop (unfortuanately
 my one and only computer at the moment). Looks like I'll end up at a


 user group to get it right
 in Saturday week. In the meantime what is the best way to come up to


 What's a good read?

Try something else: My personal preference is BSD, not Linux http://www.freebsd.org/ http://www.openbsd.org/ http://www.netbsd.org/

How come? Any chance it would be easier to install on a laptop?

FreeBSD never gave me any trouble on any laptop (notebook). Nor on any desktop by the way... First check if your hardware is supported though (especially PCCard and CardBus cards!)
 RedHat and SuSe Linux seem to be pretty good too.

I've already gave Mandrake a good try a while back. I then tried Progeny which is supposed to be a no-brainer install derived from Debian. It's was no good. I just figured that it would be best to just keep trying with Debian until I knew enough to get it right. At the moment it's Windows XP/NTFS that are being the most difficult. The first time I turned up to the user-group to install Debian it took >8 hours to defrag the hdd! There wasn't much time left after that.

Yeah, that is the one thing about XP I do not like. Sometimes when I restart my system it is busy for a while too to chkdsk the HDD. It takes about 10 minutes though I think... Jan
Aug 03 2002