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D - "There have been at least a dozen languages called D"

reply Stewart Gordon <smjg_1998 yahoo.com> writes:
So says Bjarne Stroustrup.

FOLDOC mentions:

1. "The Data Language." MS-DOS 4GL.

2. A Haskell-like language, with type classes.


I recall reading of another one on some little dictionary of programming 
languages somewhere on the web.  But I forget where.

Does anyone here actually know anything about any of these namesakes? 
Or even have a reference for any of them?

Stewart.

-- 
My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the 
unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment.  Please keep 
replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Apr 20 2004
next sibling parent reply J C Calvarese <jcc7 cox.net> writes:
In article <c6375m$2a2p$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Stewart Gordon says...
So says Bjarne Stroustrup.

FOLDOC mentions:

1. "The Data Language." MS-DOS 4GL.

2. A Haskell-like language, with type classes.


I recall reading of another one on some little dictionary of programming 
languages somewhere on the web.  But I forget where.

Does anyone here actually know anything about any of these namesakes? 
Or even have a reference for any of them?

Stewart.

3. Sun's D programming language for DTrace (Solaris) http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/content/dtrace/ Justin
Apr 20 2004
next sibling parent reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
"J C Calvarese" <jcc7 cox.net> wrote in message
news:c63gbp$2qfm$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In article <c6375m$2a2p$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Stewart Gordon says...
 3.
 Sun's D programming language for DTrace (Solaris)
 http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/content/dtrace/

 Justin

According to what I've read on it, that project was kicked off in 2001. Our D predates it by two years. I spent a fair amount of time looking for pre-existing D programming languages before D got started, and came up pretty much with nothing significant that was being actively maintained.
Apr 20 2004
parent J C Calvarese <jcc7 cox.net> writes:
In article <c63odu$77a$2 digitaldaemon.com>, Walter says...
"J C Calvarese" <jcc7 cox.net> wrote in message
news:c63gbp$2qfm$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In article <c6375m$2a2p$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Stewart Gordon says...
 3.
 Sun's D programming language for DTrace (Solaris)
 http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/content/dtrace/

 Justin

According to what I've read on it, that project was kicked off in 2001. Our

2001 sounds like what I read. I didn't mean to imply their D predates ours.
D predates it by two years.

I spent a fair amount of time looking for pre-existing D programming
languages before D got started, and came up pretty much with nothing
significant that was being actively maintained.

I spent some time Googling "D Programming Language" and 99% of the pages I found had a link or reference to Digital Mars. I think we've gotten the name recognition taken care of. Justin
Apr 20 2004
prev sibling parent reply "Matthew" <matthew.hat stlsoft.dot.org> writes:
I was talking to a friend - who's a Sun engineer - about D while in England,
and he mentioned Sun's D language. He suggested that Sun is not an
organisation that tries to screw over the likes of Digital Mars, but he
suggested that we establish who used the name first. I offered that, AFAIK,
Walter's been talking about D for 15 years, and has been doing it since
about 1998, which should make it ok (if there was a problem from Sun's side,
which I have no indication that there is, of course).

"J C Calvarese" <jcc7 cox.net> wrote in message
news:c63gbp$2qfm$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 In article <c6375m$2a2p$1 digitaldaemon.com>, Stewart Gordon says...
So says Bjarne Stroustrup.

FOLDOC mentions:

1. "The Data Language." MS-DOS 4GL.

2. A Haskell-like language, with type classes.


I recall reading of another one on some little dictionary of programming
languages somewhere on the web.  But I forget where.

Does anyone here actually know anything about any of these namesakes?
Or even have a reference for any of them?

Stewart.

3. Sun's D programming language for DTrace (Solaris) http://www.sun.com/bigadmin/content/dtrace/ Justin

Apr 20 2004
parent reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
"Matthew" <matthew.hat stlsoft.dot.org> wrote in message
news:c63vum$kc0$2 digitaldaemon.com...
 I was talking to a friend - who's a Sun engineer - about D while in

 and he mentioned Sun's D language. He suggested that Sun is not an
 organisation that tries to screw over the likes of Digital Mars, but he
 suggested that we establish who used the name first. I offered that,

 Walter's been talking about D for 15 years, and has been doing it since
 about 1998, which should make it ok (if there was a problem from Sun's

 which I have no indication that there is, of course).

The earliest dates on Sun's D public documentation are November 2003. The D spec first appeared publicly in August 2001, and appeared on slashdot that month. I'd been working specifically on D since late 1999, though D as a successor to C has been talked about since at least 1988. The precedent is clear and easilly verified.
Apr 20 2004
next sibling parent reply "Matthew" <matthew.hat stlsoft.dot.org> writes:
Cool. We wouldn't want to have to rename that book. ;)

"Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> wrote in message
news:c64bb2$17rq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 "Matthew" <matthew.hat stlsoft.dot.org> wrote in message
 news:c63vum$kc0$2 digitaldaemon.com...
 I was talking to a friend - who's a Sun engineer - about D while in

 and he mentioned Sun's D language. He suggested that Sun is not an
 organisation that tries to screw over the likes of Digital Mars, but he
 suggested that we establish who used the name first. I offered that,

 Walter's been talking about D for 15 years, and has been doing it since
 about 1998, which should make it ok (if there was a problem from Sun's

 which I have no indication that there is, of course).

The earliest dates on Sun's D public documentation are November 2003. The

 spec first appeared publicly in August 2001, and appeared on slashdot that
 month. I'd been working specifically on D since late 1999, though D as a
 successor to C has been talked about since at least 1988.

 The precedent is clear and easilly verified.

Apr 20 2004
parent "Phill" <phill pacific.net.au> writes:
I think that if they had a problem with the name, you would have heard all
about it by now.

Mathew please stop teasing us about this book!

Phill.

"Matthew" <matthew.hat stlsoft.dot.org> wrote in message
news:c64d2c$1aip$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Cool. We wouldn't want to have to rename that book. ;)

 "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> wrote in message
 news:c64bb2$17rq$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 "Matthew" <matthew.hat stlsoft.dot.org> wrote in message
 news:c63vum$kc0$2 digitaldaemon.com...
 I was talking to a friend - who's a Sun engineer - about D while in

 and he mentioned Sun's D language. He suggested that Sun is not an
 organisation that tries to screw over the likes of Digital Mars, but



 suggested that we establish who used the name first. I offered that,

 Walter's been talking about D for 15 years, and has been doing it



 about 1998, which should make it ok (if there was a problem from Sun's

 which I have no indication that there is, of course).

The earliest dates on Sun's D public documentation are November 2003.


 D
 spec first appeared publicly in August 2001, and appeared on slashdot


 month. I'd been working specifically on D since late 1999, though D as a
 successor to C has been talked about since at least 1988.

 The precedent is clear and easilly verified.


--- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.659 / Virus Database: 423 - Release Date: 4/15/2004
Apr 21 2004
prev sibling parent reply Stewart Gordon <smjg_1998 yahoo.com> writes:
Walter wrote:
<snip>
 The earliest dates on Sun's D public documentation are November 2003. The D
 spec first appeared publicly in August 2001, and appeared on slashdot that
 month. I'd been working specifically on D since late 1999, though D as a
 successor to C has been talked about since at least 1988.

The name of C's successor has been debated since pre-C++ days. C was a successor to B, which was in turn inspired by BCPL. The debate was whether the next language would be D (next letter of the alphabet) or P (next letter of BCPL). P and L have also been used as language names. As have J and K.... Stewart. -- My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Apr 21 2004
parent "C. Sauls" <ibisbasenji yahoo.com> writes:
Don't forget about E...  http://www.erights.org/

-C. Sauls
-Invironz
Apr 21 2004
prev sibling parent reply J C Calvarese <jcc7 cox.net> writes:
Stewart Gordon wrote:

 So says Bjarne Stroustrup.
 
 FOLDOC mentions:
 
 1. "The Data Language." MS-DOS 4GL.
 
 2. A Haskell-like language, with type classes.
 
 
 I recall reading of another one on some little dictionary of programming 
 languages somewhere on the web.  But I forget where.
 
 Does anyone here actually know anything about any of these namesakes? Or 
 even have a reference for any of them?
 
 Stewart.

Is this what you refer to as "Haskell-like with type classes"? http://www.cs.jhu.edu/~scott/plbook/book/html/mainch4.html#x6-300002.3 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- The D Programming Language Now that we have seen how to define and understand operational semantics, we will begin to study our first programming language: D. D is a “Diminutive” pure functional programming language. It has integers, booleans, and higher-order anonymous functions. In most ways D is much weaker than Caml: there are no reals, lists, types, modules, state, or exceptions. D is untyped, and in this way is it actually more powerful than Caml. It is possible to write some programs in D that produce no runtime errors, but which will not typecheck in Caml. For instance, our encoding of recursion in Section 2.3.5 is not typeable in Caml. Type systems are discussed in Chapter 6. Because there are no types, runtime errors can occur in D, for example the application (5 3). Although it is very simplistic, D is still Turing-complete: every partial recursive function on numbers can be written in D. In fact, it is even Turing-complete without numbers or booleans. This language with only functions and application is known as the pure lambda-calculus, and is discussed briefly in Section 2.4.3. No deterministic programming language can compute more than the partial recursive functions. -- Justin http://jcc_7.tripod.com/d/
Apr 20 2004
parent reply "Kris" <someidiot earthlink.dot.dot.dot.net> writes:
Ack; I see that reference to Caml and balk: I recently built a mini-compiler
for Caml, as in "Clothing Animation Markup Language", for a wearable
micro-controller environment ... all the good names are already overloaded
:-(

Don Knuth was right; get the name down first, then build the language around
it <g>

- Kris


"J C Calvarese" <jcc7 cox.net> wrote in message > The D Programming Language
 Now that we have seen how to define and understand operational
 semantics, we will begin to study our first programming language: D. D
 is a “Diminutive” pure functional programming language. It has integers,
 booleans, and higher-order anonymous functions. In most ways D is much
 weaker than Caml: there are no reals, lists, types, modules, state, or
 exceptions.

Apr 20 2004
parent "C. Sauls" <ibisbasenji yahoo.com> writes:
Kris wrote:
 all the good names are already overloaded

Its true! Some friends and I worked on a concept-language named Definer, then renamed it to Lux in 2001. A little web-searching one day made me realize there were already a few Lux's running around. (Its a good thing we only jokingly considered shortening its name to D...) -C. Sauls -Invironz
Apr 20 2004