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D - DMD 0.63 release

reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
Adds linux version.

http://www.digitalmars.com/d/changelog.html
May 10 2003
next sibling parent reply John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
Walter wrote:
 Adds linux version.
 
 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/changelog.html
 
 
 

Ha ha, I think I was trying to download this at the exact time you were uploading it (???). I got a corrupt file that was only half the size expected. Tried again, and got the whole thing. I checked this list and sure enough a new post was here, and my version was indeed 0.63. :^D Wow, a linux version?! Nice work, Walter! Now to see if it works on Gentoo linux. John
May 10 2003
parent reply Stephan Wienczny <wienczny web.de> writes:
John Reimer wrote:
  > Ha ha, I think I was trying to download this at the exact time you were
 uploading it (???).  I got a corrupt file that was only half the size 
 expected.  Tried again, and got the whole thing.  I checked this list 
 and sure enough a new post was here, and my version was indeed 0.63. :^D
 
 Wow, a linux version?!  Nice work, Walter!  Now to see if it works on 
 Gentoo linux.

Do you create an ebuild? Stephan
May 10 2003
next sibling parent reply Javier Uyuni <Javier_member pathlink.com> writes:
You forgot to remove the back up file (Readme.BAK)
May 10 2003
parent John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
Javier Uyuni wrote:

 You forgot to remove the back up file (Readme.BAK)
 
 

?? Not sure what you are talking about. I use phoenix as my web browser (now named firebird).
May 10 2003
prev sibling parent John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
Stephan Wienczny wrote:
 John Reimer wrote:
  > Ha ha, I think I was trying to download this at the exact time you were
 
 uploading it (???).  I got a corrupt file that was only half the size 
 expected.  Tried again, and got the whole thing.  I checked this list 
 and sure enough a new post was here, and my version was indeed 0.63. :^D

 Wow, a linux version?!  Nice work, Walter!  Now to see if it works on 
 Gentoo linux.

Do you create an ebuild? Stephan

I was thinking of the possibility, but I haven't figured out how to do ebuilds yet. Later, John
May 10 2003
prev sibling next sibling parent reply John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
Walter wrote:
 Adds linux version.
 
 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/changelog.html
 
 
 

Walter, would you be able to include separate download links and zip archives for the linux and win32 versions of D? I suppose it's quite simple to delete then unneeded platform files, but it's less confusing to just download the preferred OS installation. Later, John
May 10 2003
parent reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
"John Reimer" <jjreimer telus.net> wrote in message
news:b9ihss$2i2g$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Walter wrote:
 Adds linux version.

 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/changelog.html

archives for the linux and win32 versions of D? I suppose it's quite simple to delete then unneeded platform files, but it's less confusing to just download the preferred OS installation.

Since they're 95% identical, I thought it'd be less confusing to combine them.
May 10 2003
next sibling parent John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
On Sat, 10 May 2003 11:27:11 -0700, Walter wrote:

 
 "John Reimer" <jjreimer telus.net> wrote in message
 news:b9ihss$2i2g$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 Walter wrote:
 Adds linux version.

 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/changelog.html

archives for the linux and win32 versions of D? I suppose it's quite simple to delete then unneeded platform files, but it's less confusing to just download the preferred OS installation.

Since they're 95% identical, I thought it'd be less confusing to combine them.

OK. Maybe the link could now say "win32/linux" then? I was wondering where the linux version was until I inspected the archive. Thanks, John
May 10 2003
prev sibling next sibling parent reply Garen Parham <nospam garen.net> writes:
Walter wrote:


 Since they're 95% identical, I thought it'd be less confusing to combine
 them.

Yeah, but a plain .zip file doesn't preserve permissions for Linux. I had to manually chmod +x the binaries.
May 10 2003
parent John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
On Sat, 10 May 2003 12:43:59 -0700, Garen Parham wrote:


 Yeah, but a plain .zip file doesn't preserve permissions for Linux.
 I had to manually chmod +x the binaries.

Very true. I had to do the same to make the binaries executable.
May 10 2003
prev sibling parent reply All The Mac Pepole. <All_member pathlink.com> writes:
Since they're 95% identical, I thought it'd be less confusing to combine
them.

curious if it would a big deal to get it working on the Mac, since it is very close to Linux ,so far, that if want you could partition the Mac machine and install Unix , and also the Mac osx I think is a quite a bit more popular tha Linux. If you get that then it would be a true cross plattform language. I think you should consider it and automaticlly "D" will gain much more and much faster popularity . Please consider!! Thanks.
May 10 2003
next sibling parent reply Bill Cox <bill viasic.com> writes:
Hi.

I suspect running on Mac wouldn't be all that hard...  It might be worth 
doing.

However, I've got some old beefs with Apple.  I'm not going to cry for 
them if they go under.

Do you remember the Apple II?  I loved those machines.  I wrote tons of 
code on them.  Back then, I was a huge Apple fan.  Then, the Franklin 
came out (and others).  Clones.  Apple sued them out of business. 
Apple, and Steve Jobs in particular, had decided not to give up an inch 
of the hardware market.

Then, Apple made an enemy of Microsoft.  Come on... if you're determined 
to sell HARDWARE, then be nice to the SOFTWARE guys!  What morons. 
Again, Jobs wanted it ALL.

Then, the Mac really took off.  Apple had the largest technology lead in 
software I can remember ever seeing at any company.  This was the right 
time to decide to become a real software vendor, but Jobs wouldn't do 
it.  Instead, Apple made us all buy expensive slow hardware just to have 
the change to buy their software.

Then came Atari's color computer with a real OS, and better hardware, 
and a very nice windowing system.  Apple sued them out of the computer 
business, claiming to have invented basic windowing systems.  They 
hadn't.  Xerox had.  They broke new ground in suing over look-and-feel, 
and all that crap.  Only Microsoft had the money and guts to stand up to 
them.  So... Apple is responsible for squashing inovation in the Windows 
OS market and handing it to Microsoft!  It took them years, and it still 
isn't as good, but eventually, Microsoft can do just about anything.

Then, Jobs took a less active roll in the company.  I forget which CEO 
it was, but the first one that wasn't on a leash decided to make Apple's 
hardware an open platform.  This was a good idea, and still is, just 
several years too late.  Big companies, like IBM and Motorolla put 
hundreds of millions of dollars into the first Apple clones and new CPU. 
  IBM designed the PowerPC, and added copper interconnect.  Motorola had 
the sweetest laptops ever built by a long shot.  Then, Jobs came back, 
and screwed Apple's partners.  He simply refused to let the clone makers 
run his OS.  It was clear breech of contract, but IBM and Motorolla (and 
others) couldn't do anything about it.

So... Why are Macs so slow?  Because they pissed off the CPU 
manufacturers.  That was stupid.  Both IBM and Motorolla have little 
incentive to do anything nice for Apple now.

So naturally a company this dumb has had some hard times.  The amazing 
thing to me is that they still exist.  One thing that helps companies 
like HP get through hard times is being fair with employees.  Apple has 
had a pretty good reputation, but when Jobs came back into power at 
Apple, that changed.  The story I hear is he personally went around the 
company asking random employees "How do you contribute to the bottom 
line?"  If they stammered, he had security guards take them out of the 
building.  Fired on the spot.  He was so unpopular at a time that 
Silicon Valley really needed his tallented work force, that head-hunters 
had a field day.  One flew an airplane over Apple's main campus, with a 
sign asking for employees to call him.

All that said, my wife loves her Mac.  I bought her an IPOD for Mother's 
Day.  I'd even port our company's software to it if Macs weren't so 
damned slow.

Bill

All The Mac Pepole. wrote:
Since they're 95% identical, I thought it'd be less confusing to combine
them.

Walter ! I saw all the Mac os threads and the last few of Linux , I 'm just curious if it would a big deal to get it working on the Mac, since it is very close to Linux ,so far, that if want you could partition the Mac machine and install Unix , and also the Mac osx I think is a quite a bit more popular tha Linux. If you get that then it would be a true cross plattform language. I think you should consider it and automaticlly "D" will gain much more and much faster popularity . Please consider!! Thanks.

May 10 2003
next sibling parent Andy Friesen <andy ikagames.com> writes:
Bill Cox wrote:
 Hi.
 
 I suspect running on Mac wouldn't be all that hard...  It might be worth 
 doing.
 
 However, I've got some old beefs with Apple.  I'm not going to cry for 
 them if they go under.
 
 Do you remember the Apple II?  I loved those machines.  I wrote tons of 
 code on them.  Back then, I was a huge Apple fan.  Then, the Franklin 
 came out (and others).  Clones.  Apple sued them out of business. Apple, 
 and Steve Jobs in particular, had decided not to give up an inch of the 
 hardware market.
 
 Then, Apple made an enemy of Microsoft.  Come on... if you're determined 
 to sell HARDWARE, then be nice to the SOFTWARE guys!  What morons. 
 Again, Jobs wanted it ALL.
 
 Then, the Mac really took off.  Apple had the largest technology lead in 
 software I can remember ever seeing at any company.  This was the right 
 time to decide to become a real software vendor, but Jobs wouldn't do 
 it.  Instead, Apple made us all buy expensive slow hardware just to have 
 the change to buy their software.
 
 Then came Atari's color computer with a real OS, and better hardware, 
 and a very nice windowing system.  Apple sued them out of the computer 
 business, claiming to have invented basic windowing systems.  They 
 hadn't.  Xerox had.  They broke new ground in suing over look-and-feel, 
 and all that crap.  Only Microsoft had the money and guts to stand up to 
 them.  So... Apple is responsible for squashing inovation in the Windows 
 OS market and handing it to Microsoft!  It took them years, and it still 
 isn't as good, but eventually, Microsoft can do just about anything.
 
 Then, Jobs took a less active roll in the company.  I forget which CEO 
 it was, but the first one that wasn't on a leash decided to make Apple's 
 hardware an open platform.  This was a good idea, and still is, just 
 several years too late.  Big companies, like IBM and Motorolla put 
 hundreds of millions of dollars into the first Apple clones and new CPU. 
  IBM designed the PowerPC, and added copper interconnect.  Motorola had 
 the sweetest laptops ever built by a long shot.  Then, Jobs came back, 
 and screwed Apple's partners.  He simply refused to let the clone makers 
 run his OS.  It was clear breech of contract, but IBM and Motorolla (and 
 others) couldn't do anything about it.
 
 So... Why are Macs so slow?  Because they pissed off the CPU 
 manufacturers.  That was stupid.  Both IBM and Motorolla have little 
 incentive to do anything nice for Apple now.
 
 So naturally a company this dumb has had some hard times.  The amazing 
 thing to me is that they still exist.  One thing that helps companies 
 like HP get through hard times is being fair with employees.  Apple has 
 had a pretty good reputation, but when Jobs came back into power at 
 Apple, that changed.  The story I hear is he personally went around the 
 company asking random employees "How do you contribute to the bottom 
 line?"  If they stammered, he had security guards take them out of the 
 building.  Fired on the spot.  He was so unpopular at a time that 
 Silicon Valley really needed his tallented work force, that head-hunters 
 had a field day.  One flew an airplane over Apple's main campus, with a 
 sign asking for employees to call him.
 
 All that said, my wife loves her Mac.  I bought her an IPOD for Mother's 
 Day.  I'd even port our company's software to it if Macs weren't so 
 damned slow.
 
 Bill
 

I was about to comment about the difficulty of writing an entire compiler back-end for PPC in comparison to tweaking the existing back-end to output ELF binaries and link with linux libs, but I guess that's a good reason too. :) In the meantime, Macs are pretty good at emulating x86, so you can always use DMD that way.
May 10 2003
prev sibling parent John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
Well that was actually a fairly accurate rendition of the Apple story.  I
must admit, it always makes for an interesting read.  I heard that Jobs
was indeed a harsh taskmaster.  But I don't necessarily feel Apple is any
more irresponsible or more evil than other companies like...what's that big
one...
Microsoft.  They are alive because, to some extent, they were innovative. 
And people liked what they had to offer.

Today, though I don't use them, I love Macintoshes and think they are
among the most aesthetically appealing systems around (hardware and
software).  I really don't think Window's XP has much appeal at all in
comparison.  Yet, there is so much software available for it, how could
Window's not be useful these days.  Still, I like x86 based systems
because they are so easy to customize the hardware and OS. And they're
cheap!

Anyway ... I've always loved reading tidbits from computer history.  
Concerning PARC, a very interesting read is Adele Goldberg's perspective of
Steve Jobs little shenanigan.  She was the one that worked with Alan Kay
on Smalltalk and was around when these events took place.  I quote:

"Then Jobs came back for a second demo.  He came back with the entire Lisa
programming team. (Lisa was the predecessor office workstation to the
Macintosh and the competitor to the Xerox Star Workstation of the same
period.) Jobs sat with the Apple programmers in a conference room and
waited.  He waited three hours while I, as current LRG manager, argued in
vain that a demo for the programming team was an inappropriate give-away
of Xerox research results.  Worse, Jobs insisted that I give the demo,
knowing I was the group's teacher.  My manager at the time was head of
PARC Science Center (PARC was split into two while the Corporation sought
a new PARC manager who could do a better job of handling the disagreements
between CSL and most of the rest of PARC.)  My manager ordered me to give
the demo, claiming later that he was ordered to do so from corporate.  It
is doubtful that corporate understood enough to be giving any such orders.
The plans for Lisa were revised."

(Adele Goldberg, pp 69-70, Chapter 3, The Community of Smalltalk, Object
Oriented
Programming Languages, Handbook of Programming Languages, Volume I, 1998
Macmillian Technical Publishing)

Now this is getting way off topic.  I apologize.  It's just too
interesting :-).

Later,

John
May 10 2003
prev sibling parent reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
Is osx binary compatible with linux?

"All The Mac Pepole." <All_member pathlink.com> wrote in message
news:b9kj82$1a64$1 digitaldaemon.com...
Since they're 95% identical, I thought it'd be less confusing to combine
them.


 curious if it would a big
 deal to get it working on the Mac, since it is very close to Linux ,so

 if want you could
 partition the Mac machine and install Unix , and also the Mac osx I think

 quite a bit more
 popular tha Linux.
 If you get that then it would be a true cross plattform language. I think

 should consider it and
 automaticlly "D" will gain much more and much faster popularity .
 Please consider!! Thanks.

May 11 2003
parent reply John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
On Sun, 11 May 2003 01:21:28 -0700, Walter wrote:

 Is osx binary compatible with linux?
 

OS X is based on the Darwin kernel which is, in turn, a derivative a BSD Unix kernel. Most of the BSD Unix flavors support a linux kernel compatibility layer, so that most binaries from linux can be run without change on the BSDs (provided they are compiled for the CPU architecture, of course; in this case, powerpc). That said, I don't know how well darwin carries over the support for the linux compatibility layer, or if it even does for the PowerPC architecture. This may be an x86 only feature. Later, John
May 11 2003
parent reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
"John Reimer" <jjreimer telus.net> wrote in message
news:pan.2003.05.11.12.16.06.842563 telus.net...
 On Sun, 11 May 2003 01:21:28 -0700, Walter wrote:
 Is osx binary compatible with linux?

OS X is based on the Darwin kernel which is, in turn, a derivative a BSD Unix kernel. Most of the BSD Unix flavors support a linux kernel compatibility layer, so that most binaries from linux can be run without change on the BSDs (provided they are compiled for the CPU architecture, of course; in this case, powerpc). That said, I don't know how well darwin carries over the support for the linux compatibility layer, or if

 even does for the PowerPC architecture.  This may be an x86 only feature.

Beign a powerpc is a whole 'nother problem. I don't have a ppc code generator.
May 11 2003
parent reply John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
On Sun, 11 May 2003 12:04:57 -0700, Walter wrote:

 
 Beign a powerpc is a whole 'nother problem. I don't have a ppc code
 generator.

Yes, I realized that to be the real problem after I posted :-P.
May 11 2003
parent reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
"John Reimer" <jjreimer telus.net> wrote in message
news:pan.2003.05.11.19.39.42.931720 telus.net...
 On Sun, 11 May 2003 12:04:57 -0700, Walter wrote:
 Beign a powerpc is a whole 'nother problem. I don't have a ppc code
 generator.


Perhaps you could write Apple and tell them they should do an x86 Apple !!
May 11 2003
parent John Reimer <jjreimer telus.net> writes:
On Sun, 11 May 2003 16:38:16 -0700, Walter wrote:

 
 "John Reimer" <jjreimer telus.net> wrote in message
 news:pan.2003.05.11.19.39.42.931720 telus.net...
 On Sun, 11 May 2003 12:04:57 -0700, Walter wrote:
 Beign a powerpc is a whole 'nother problem. I don't have a ppc code
 generator.


Perhaps you could write Apple and tell them they should do an x86 Apple !!

LOL, with Apples history and Jobs at the helm? This would be a great evil from their perspective... but I would love it! Steve Jobs seems to rely heavily on his powerful RDF (Reality Distortion Field), which he is so famous for; so he does better when he has control over the hardware. Oh, there's been rumors upon rumors about Apple conniving with AMD for a AMD64-based Apple, but I don't think it'll happen. Mind you Darwin is ported to x86 already. The hang-up is Jobs and his worries about all those nasty cloners :-). Later, John
May 11 2003
prev sibling next sibling parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> writes:
"Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> escribiσ en el mensaje
news:b9igp4$2gut$1 digitaldaemon.com...
| Adds linux version.
|
| http://www.digitalmars.com/d/changelog.html
|
|
|

Great!

It's more a gcc question, but maybe someone here can help me. How do I
create a .a from lots of .o? I was trying to build deimos.a, but I didn't
have any luck. I must say, however, that using plain .o it works just like
in win32.

—————————————————————————
Carlos Santander


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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May 10 2003
next sibling parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> writes:
"Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> escribiσ en el mensaje
news:b9ji5s$dis$1 digitaldaemon.com...
|
| It's more a gcc question, but maybe someone here can help me. How do I
| create a .a from lots of .o? I was trying to build deimos.a, but I didn't
| have any luck. I must say, however, that using plain .o it works just like
| in win32.
|

Nevermind, I think I found it. It's with "ar", isn't it?

—————————————————————————
Carlos Santander


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.478 / Virus Database: 275 - Release Date: 2003-05-06
May 10 2003
parent reply "Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> writes:
"Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> escribiσ en el mensaje
news:b9jrnh$lvf$1 digitaldaemon.com...
| "Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> escribiσ en el mensaje
| news:b9ji5s$dis$1 digitaldaemon.com...
| |
| | It's more a gcc question, but maybe someone here can help me. How do I
| | create a .a from lots of .o? I was trying to build deimos.a, but I
didn't
| | have any luck. I must say, however, that using plain .o it works just
like
| | in win32.
| |
|
| Nevermind, I think I found it. It's with "ar", isn't it?
|

Apparently it is with "ar". However, I can't get it to work.

I created deimos.a like this:

dmd -c deimos/base deimos/arrays deimos/range deimos/rangeset deimos/utils
deimos/numerics -I/dmd/src/phobos
ar rcs deimos.a deimos/*.o --------> I get the same message if I go to
deimos and then do: ar rcs deimos.a *.o

Now, I have testdeimos.d:

import deimos.base, c.stdio;
void main() {
    instance TComparable(char) cmp;
    printf('%c'\n,cmp.clamp('a','b','e'));
}

If I compile it like this:

dmd -c testdeimos deimos/base -I/dmd/src/phobos
gcc -o testdeimos testdeimos.o base.o /dmd/lib/phobos.a -lm -lpthread

It works perfectly. But if I do this:

dmd -c testdeimos -I/dmd/src/phobos
gcc -o testdeimos testdeimos.o /dmd/lib/deimos.a
/dmd/lib/phobos.a -lm -lpthread

I get:

testdeimos.o: In function `_Dbase__TComparable_a_clamp_Faaaza':
testdeimos.o(.gnu.linkonce.t_Dbase__TComparable_a_clamp_Faaaza+0x14):
undefined reference to `_assert_base'

And that's what I've been getting since I started this morning.

—————————————————————————
Carlos Santander


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.478 / Virus Database: 275 - Release Date: 2003-05-06
May 10 2003
parent reply "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
Use ar -r to create the archive, not ar rcs. Check /dmd/src/phobos/linux.mak
for an example.
May 11 2003
parent "Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> writes:
"Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> escribiσ en el mensaje
news:b9l1s5$1nq0$1 digitaldaemon.com...
| Use ar -r to create the archive, not ar rcs. Check
/dmd/src/phobos/linux.mak
| for an example.
|
|

No luck either. I'm gonna give up by now. Thanks anyway.

—————————————————————————
Carlos Santander


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.478 / Virus Database: 275 - Release Date: 2003-05-06
May 11 2003
prev sibling parent "Walter" <walter digitalmars.com> writes:
"Carlos Santander B." <carlos8294 msn.com> wrote in message
news:b9ji5s$dis$1 digitaldaemon.com...
 It's more a gcc question, but maybe someone here can help me. How do I
 create a .a from lots of .o? I was trying to build deimos.a, but I didn't
 have any luck. I must say, however, that using plain .o it works just like
 in win32.

/dmd/src/phobos/linux.mak should be helpful.
May 10 2003
prev sibling parent Andy Friesen <andy ikagames.com> writes:
Walter wrote:
 Adds linux version.
 
 http://www.digitalmars.com/d/changelog.html
 

There seem to be some strange problems with modules having classes sharing the same name. The following code fails because c.Foo supposedly wants an integer in its constructor. The second method call also causes an error: "function method () does not match argument types (double)" a.d(7): constructor this (int i) does not match argument types (wchar[6]) a.d: import b; import c; void main() { b.Foo bfoo = new b.Foo(5); c.Foo cfoo = new c.Foo("sup yo"); bfoo.method(); cfoo.method(3.14); } b.d: class Foo { int _i; public: this(int i) { _i = i; } void method() { printf("%i\n", _i); } } c.d: import string; class Foo { private: char[] _msg; public: this(char[] msg) { _msg = msg; } void method(double d) { printf("%s %f\n", toStringz(_msg), d); } } Additionally: new b.Foo("blah").method(); // "found '.' when expecting ';'" (new b.Foo("blah")).method(); // works Even more interesting, I'm also getting an access error: c.d(11): class Foo member _msg is not accessible
May 10 2003